UK - London construction dig unearths 450-year-old graveyard of Bedlam's lost souls

Discussion in 'Up to the Minute' started by wfgodot, Aug 9, 2013.

  1. wfgodot

    wfgodot Former Member

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    The term "Bedlam" actually devolves from spelling changed to fit pronunciation: the hospital was originally called St. Mary of Bethlehem; the latter term was corrupted to "Bethlem" in common speech and, likewise, later, to "Bedlam."

    The lost souls of 'Bedlam' are found: Asylum's ancient graveyard is unearthed beneath London as Crossrail dig reveals patients' bones

    • 500-year-old graveyard near Liverpool Street found during Crossrail works
    • Cemetery contains 20,000 skeletons including patients of Bedlam asylum
    • Other finds include rare Roman coins and an entire stretch of Roman road
    • A 13-mile high speed tunnel is currently being built under Central London
    many pictures and a video at Daily Mail link above
     
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  3. Sonya610

    Sonya610 Former Member

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    It is amazing the bones remain in such good shape after 500 years. What is in that soil?
     
  4. Show Me

    Show Me New Member

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    Eleven feet beneath the skeletons lies a roman road where the ancient horseshoes were found. The earth is getting bigger! lol The coins are in perfect shape.

    You just can dig anywhere in London without finding thousands of years of history in layers.
     
  5. zwiebel

    zwiebel New Member

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    These people here will almost certainly answer that question properly for you;
    http://www.museumoflondonarchaeology.org.uk/

    I know that the water is very soft in London, without much chalk or stuff like that. Maybe that's something to do with it? I used to come across huge bones when I wandered on the little bit of the banks of the Thames a person can still access. They were very old, from the where tannerys and gluemakers had just tipped their waste into the river.
     
  6. KR1

    KR1 New Member

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    We walked from our house to the Tower of London and All Hallows church last Monday, and our route goes through Liverpool St Station, past both the original Bedlam site, where it was moved to and this excavation - really interesting.

    A friend lives near to a brick wall put up in the 1800s which contains some old Bedlam bricks, they really stand out.

    The Crossrail project is unearthing some incredible finds, right the way back to Neolithic times, fascinating - we're 20 minutes walk from St Paul's, the City, the old Roman walls etc and walk all around the area, very lucky!
     
  7. wfgodot

    wfgodot Former Member

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    Sunday Mail:

    What did he die of? Grim job continues to excavate bodies of 20,000 corpses buried at Bedlam

     

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