GUILTY UK - Louise Smith, 16, Havant, Hampshire, 8 May 2020 *Arrest*

Discussion in 'Recently Sentenced and Beyond' started by imstilla.grandma, May 11, 2020.

  1. Stumpyaura

    Stumpyaura Well-Known Member

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    I was walking through Havant Thicket yesterday, close to where it happened and it made me so sad to think of poor Louise. Where it happened was on the outer edges of where people might be walking but tantalising close to where a large amount of people would have been enjoying family walks and exercise that day. It is unimaginable that such brutality was happening hundreds of yards away from people in all likelihood and that he walked off that day not full of remorse and horror at what had just happened, but anger still at Louise for whatever perceived wrong she had done that caused him to to carry out that act. I don't understand why the judge didn't take into account all of the cold and calculating factors that make him an extremely dangerous individual (and going to see her mother that day is terrible to imagine).
     
  2. Alyce

    Alyce Well-Known Member

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    Completely agree Stumpy. Psychopath for sure. Watching the video clips of him walking to his mother's house in Stratfield Gardens, just minutes after he has murdered Louise, he just looks so casual and normal. I know this is the case with many violent murderers, they have no concern or thought for what they have done, but it is still chilling to see.
     
  3. StillDiggin

    StillDiggin Well-Known Member

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    This is a video that shows Hampshires Search and rescue operation involvement in there search for Louise.
    Hampshire Search and Rescue the support from the community was outstanding.
     
  4. Justice4all9

    Justice4all9 Active Member

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    Its comforting for us non murderers to classify SM as a monster (I was at the front of the line). I'm not excusing the horrific crimes he committed upon Louise, if it were not for him she would be alive. There were other factors at play both for Louise and for him, She was vulnerable and frustration and anger were obviously building in him. His memory lapses and denial might be better described as Dissociation. The level of overkill and self denial points to this. As a dissociater myself I agree there is always a choice. Despite his leery 'arrogant' grin, I think SM would be better rehabilitated in a mental health institution ( horrible name) basically a hospital
     
  5. dalsglen

    dalsglen Well-Known Member

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    Just, nope
     
  6. Kitkat28

    Kitkat28 Well-Known Member

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    This 100 %

    The goal is not “rehabilitation”, but justice for Louise and ensuring safety for the rest of the female population.
     
  7. Justice4all9

    Justice4all9 Active Member

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    Thats ok, I understand. An eye for an eye and all. What he did was horrendous and if it were my child, I wouldn't feel so far removed. I guess in my gut I dont feel he was truly evil, and there are some truly evil murderers out there. Taking Louise to HT was a premeditated attempted sexual assault IMO and what happened next was albeit horrific, a panicked overkill attempt to erase what he perhaps genuinely convinced himself she wanted too. I dont think we can completely ignore his extremely low intelligence and very small life. I do not in any way condone what he did, that is not what I'm saying. Not all murderers are born evil is what I believe. Someone of such a low IQ I believe is capable of freaking out and doing something horrific, that they later struggle to accept truly happened. Sorry I'm not trying to offend or minimalise his crime in any way. X
     
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  8. Stumpyaura

    Stumpyaura Well-Known Member

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    Appreciate you clarifying your opinions and I think it's always worth having a nuanced discussion about people and moving away from black and white notions of evil monsters etc but I do struggle with him to see the humanity. The attack was so brutal and so uncontrolled happening in a place where he could have been disturbed. He's demonstrated no remorse or aided the police in any step of the investigation. During the trial he still didn't take any responsibility and put the blame on Louise as being the trigger for him starting the attack. The ferocity of the attack shows what a dangerous individual he is. As for whether he should be in a therapeutic setting, he was assessed thoroughly and this was presented in court. At no point did the Clinical Psychologist suggest that he was not fit to stand trial or not responsible for his crime due to mental illness. Even the defense didn't use his low IQ as part of the defense in any meaningful way from what we can see from reports. I agree it was probably a premeditated sexual attack plan and can imagine that lock down had worsened any anger/frustration issues but I feel he was fully culpable at every stage of this terrible crime.
     
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  9. Justice4all9

    Justice4all9 Active Member

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  10. Justice4all9

    Justice4all9 Active Member

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    I can totally agree with all of what you are saying. I also struggle to believe that any sane person could commit such a crime. Maybe all prisons need to be hospitals?!

    Hospitals without keys
     
  11. Legally Bland

    Legally Bland Well-Known Member

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    Nah, plenty of people commit crimes without being mentally ill. It can be a bit of a fool's errand trying to understand the whys of people like this when you're a normal, decent person and just don't think like SM.

    There's no easy answers here, but I don't see sanity as a factor in this case.

    ETA: Just reading this back and I think it may come across as quite patronising, that really isn't my intention, hope you're not offended.
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2020
  12. mrazda71

    mrazda71 Human bean

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    I completely get where you're coming from and I agree with you.

    Perhaps it's not so much about sanity though as 'content' people don't commit crimes.

    The vast majority of people in prisons, are adults who suffered childhood poverty, neglect, abuse, sexual abuse, brain injuries, abandonment etc ... many have learning disabilities that aren't addressed, fetal alcohol syndrome.

    None of these things are made better by imprisonment alone.

    The issue is that they are sent to prison for punishment but, what they need to be 'better' is a whole host of things that would go against the wants of the 'eye for an eye' thinkers.
     
  13. mrazda71

    mrazda71 Human bean

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    I am quite frustrated with one thing about this trial...

    It being reported during the trial, before verdict that Shane had 'suffered a Stroke at 18' when after verdict it says he had 'Bells palsey' which is absolutely NOT a Stroke! It is a purely facial nerve and muscle issue which is temporary.

    A Stroke is IN the brain.
     
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  14. Legally Bland

    Legally Bland Well-Known Member

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    It was clarified before the jury retired in agreed facts. I guess it wasn't anticipated by the prosecution so they didn't challenge it at the time.
     
  15. mrazda71

    mrazda71 Human bean

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    It frustrates me so much as it spreads misinformation that can be detrimental to genuine young Stroke survivors like my daughter.

    Anyway! Thank goodness that some 'justice' has been given to Louise and the people that loved her.
     
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  16. Kitkat28

    Kitkat28 Well-Known Member

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    It’s not about “an eye for an eye” though, not for me anyway. I’m not one of those on Facebook ranting about stringing people up or vigilante justice.

    I just don’t think you need to “rehabilitate” anyone who can do that to a young woman. Society doesn’t need people like that on the streets, ever.

    I’m not particularly bothered at the trial stage whether they are evil or mentally ill because I don’t think it matters. Did they do it, yes or no? The time for doctors/psych team/etc to decide whether they are ill is afterwards to figure out where they spend their sentence, hospital or prison.
     
  17. mrazda71

    mrazda71 Human bean

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    I'd have to respectfully disagree on the 'evil' part. Using a blanket term like that detracts from the fact that they're 'just' people, just human beings...

    It's important to truly understand why people end up committing crimes like the ones we all follow here because if you don't, if you just deem them evil and lock them up then you'll never learn and ultimately prevent future crimes, which is surely what we all want?
     
  18. scapa

    scapa Well-Known Member

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    I generally agree about the value of the term "evil," in that it isn't a term of art (in crime, anyways) and doesn't have much explanatory power, since it tends to relate to a sense of outrage and horror on the part of observers (not unjustified in cases like this one) as opposed to a diagnostic category for offenders. What can we learn from his attack, given what we know, that can really protect "the next victim?" To supervise teens in care more carefully and effectively? I feel like we know that already. Just not sure.

    OTOH, I'm not sure that an impact offender like SM can be rehabilitated anytime soon, if ever. What did he contibute to society before he committed this crime? What is he likely to add if released? Incarceration serves a protective function in the near and long term -- and that may be it, unfortunately.
     
  19. Skigh

    Skigh Well-Known Member

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  20. Lucy6226

    Lucy6226 Well-Known Member

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