Found Deceased UK - Sarah Everard, 33, London - Clapham Common area, 3 March 2021 *Arrests* #13

Discussion in 'Located Persons Discussion' started by tesni, Mar 5, 2021.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Blanche

    Blanche Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    229
    Likes Received:
    951
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Work out who qualifies for criminal legal aid
     


  2. Meabh

    Meabh Active Member

    Messages:
    25
    Likes Received:
    126
    Trophy Points:
    28
    The article states he finished 'earlier' that day. It does not state he finished 'early.' His shift ended at 7am on March 3rd - This has been widely publicised. There has been no indication that he did not finish this shift.

     
  3. bos

    bos Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    550
    Likes Received:
    2,633
    Trophy Points:
    93
    I don’t see that, where?
     
    ashford5 likes this.
  4. Joolz1975

    Joolz1975 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,653
    Likes Received:
    9,867
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Yeh I think I made it up Blance :D:D.

    Will delete my clearly inaccurate previous post.

    Edited to add - maybe I wasn't, going to look further!

    He would qualify on the merit test but would he have to satisfy the means test as well as?
     
  5. Blanche

    Blanche Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    229
    Likes Received:
    951
    Trophy Points:
    93
    This is not right , you can choose who to instruct to act for you.
     
    Gers76 likes this.
  6. NottReds50

    NottReds50 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    138
    Likes Received:
    970
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Edited: Miss read the article
     
    bos likes this.
  7. ashford5

    ashford5 Active Member

    Messages:
    47
    Likes Received:
    202
    Trophy Points:
    33
    That's not what it says. It says he "had finished a shift earlier on the morning of March 3 and was not on duty at the time of Ms Everard’s disappearance."

    No difference to previous reports since Saturday when the timeline was given in court. He was working the nightshift ending in the morning of 3 March and that's all we know, despite lots of previous reporting that he had worked during the daytime on 3 March.
     
  8. Meabh

    Meabh Active Member

    Messages:
    25
    Likes Received:
    126
    Trophy Points:
    28
    To clarify, the phrase 'earlier' in the day or along those lines does not mean finishing something 'earlier' than expected, it just means, for example, finishing a shift at 7am and doing something at 9pm would mean you finished work 'earlier that day.'

    It has been widely publicised that WC finished his 7am shift on the morning of March 3rd.

    Police officer accused of Sarah Everard murder appears in court
     
    beachbum85, Hexenb, SuziQ and 4 others like this.
  9. Commoner

    Commoner Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    253
    Likes Received:
    1,570
    Trophy Points:
    93
    I expect that where he was during the day and first part of the evening in 3rd will be an active line of investigation, and we won't hear any more about it until the trial. Unless the police get permission from the judge to make a public appeal to further those enquiries

    JMO
     
  10. Sherlockhames

    Sherlockhames Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    182
    Likes Received:
    1,540
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Legal aid will likely be granted to the defendant. Cost of barrister is irrelevant and justice is not served if access to justice is limited to those with means.

    In a criminal case such as this both prosecuting and defence barristers will likely be elected via “cab rank” ie allocated on the basis of who is available. UK legal experts, correct me if I am wrong, but barristers cannot refuse cases brought to them (unless they are asked by a defendant to put forward a case they know to be untruthful). For a high profile case such as this, then top criminal barristers (ie a QC) will be leading the cases. The general public just don’t have our own “criminal lawyers” in our phone book, nor are they selected via a phone book. Not meaning to be flippant - just that our adversarial system in a high profile case such as this ensures best access to representation (also ensures we don’t get mistrials on the basis of poor legal argument that could be appealed at a later date).

    ETA: he would likely be granted immediate legal representation upon arrest. This would be a solicitor. The solicitor in this instance would then apply to appropriate chambers to ensure appropriate barrister - in our legal system, the solicitor acts first and provides legal support etc, but the barrister would be the one who argues the case in court. Distinct roles - but working closely together to put together the evidence/case for the defence. In the prosecution it is the CPS who appoint their own prosecuting barrister in court. I note the initial CPS prosecutor Zoe Martin in the Magistrates court has now been replaced with Tom Little QC for the Crown Court.
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2021
  11. CuriousObserver1

    CuriousObserver1 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    153
    Likes Received:
    966
    Trophy Points:
    93
  12. kittythehare

    kittythehare Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    12,070
    Likes Received:
    62,076
    Trophy Points:
    113
    The article states
    Couzens, who worked on the Parliamentary and Diplomatic Protection Command unit, had finished a shift earlier on the morning of March 3 and was not on duty at the time of Ms Everard’s disappearance.
    Police officer accused of Sarah Everard murder appears in court
     
  13. Joolz1975

    Joolz1975 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,653
    Likes Received:
    9,867
    Trophy Points:
    113
    elliefant and Skigh like this.
  14. NottReds50

    NottReds50 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    138
    Likes Received:
    970
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Yeah apologies, miss read, trying to do my actual job at the same time!
     
  15. Sleepysleuther

    Sleepysleuther Lawyer

    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    124
    Trophy Points:
    28
    I’m not sure how barristers are allocated, but perhaps he offered his services given how high profile it is, good publicity for him even if found guilty.
     
  16. CuriousObserver1

    CuriousObserver1 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    153
    Likes Received:
    966
    Trophy Points:
    93
    If you look at some of his cases, I think WS and MSM need to be careful as I can bet Contempt of Court is something that is going to be heavily looked into by the suspect's QC/defence team, although I like to think with such a high profile case and the evidence they already have, there won't be room for the suspect to get away with anything but the toughest sentence, unless they can prove suspect is insane.
     
  17. Blanche

    Blanche Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    229
    Likes Received:
    951
    Trophy Points:
    93
    yes he will pass the merits test than be assessed on the means test, the BBC repprt says he has applied for legal aid which is being processed so presumably his solicitors have worked out that he will qualify albeit perhaps with a contribution from his income i would have thought.
     
    Mo Thuairim likes this.
  18. PorfiryPetrovitch

    PorfiryPetrovitch Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    29
    Likes Received:
    297
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Thank you for that, I'm starting to understand it now. Does that mean one could be "lucky" and get someone like Phillippe Sands (if the case was in his area of expertise) on legal aid? Or another proven legal representative who is internationally recognised as a leader in their field?
     
  19. Joolz1975

    Joolz1975 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,653
    Likes Received:
    9,867
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Not sure he will pass the means test the threshold looks pretty low. Maybe he will have to pay a contribution.
     
    Skigh and Blanche like this.
  20. Blanche

    Blanche Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    229
    Likes Received:
    951
    Trophy Points:
    93
    his solicitor would have instructed the barrister, maybe he had already worked with him or knew he had a good reputation etc
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page



  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice