US still making payments to relatives of Civil War veterans, analysis finds

Discussion in 'Up to the Minute' started by Reader, Mar 20, 2013.

  1. Reader

    Reader New Member

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    http://www.foxnews.com/us/2013/03/2...sts-civil-war-analysis-finds/?intcmp=trending

    If history is any judge, the U.S. government will be paying for the Iraq and Afghanistan wars for the next century as service members and their families grapple with the sacrifices of combat.

    An Associated Press analysis of federal payment records found that the government is still making monthly payments to relatives of Civil War veterans — 148 years after the conflict ended.

    At the 10 year anniversary of the start of the Iraq war, more than $40 billion a year are going to compensate veterans and survivors from the Spanish-American War from 1898, World War I and II, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, the two Iraq campaigns and the Afghanistan conflict. And those costs are rising rapidly..........

    So far, the wars in Iraq, Afghanistan and the first Persian Gulf conflict in the early 1990s are costing about $12 billion a year to compensate those who have left military service or family members of those who have died.

    Those post-service compensation costs have totaled more than $50 billion since 2003, not including expenses of medical care and other benefits provided to veterans, and are poised to grow for many years to come.............

    There are 10 living recipients of benefits tied to the 1898 Spanish-American War at a total cost of about $50,000 per year. The Civil War payments are going to two children of veterans — one in North Carolina and one in Tennessee— each for $876 per year............

    Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/us/2013/03/2...analysis-finds/?intcmp=trending#ixzz2O8T7hXgl
     
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  3. wfgodot

    wfgodot Former Member

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    Just was reading this in Daily Mail before I clicked back here! Article there reminded me that there were still a handful of Civil War veterans alive after I was born. Made me feel rather old, lol.
     
  4. Show Me

    Show Me New Member

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    US making payments to Civil War Veteran's families... is the Veteran's Department that backed up in processing claims?
     
  5. AnaTeresa

    AnaTeresa New Member

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    It's for the children of veterans - only two women left, I believe.
     
  6. Show Me

    Show Me New Member

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    I said that tongue in cheek AnaTeresa. Sorry I think I should have added a lol at the end for clarity.

    Two female children left. It's amazing a war so long ago still has survivors!
     
  7. i.b.nora

    i.b.nora I am polka dot

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    So, if the widow of the soldier received the pension after the soldier died, does the pension pass on to a child of the soldier after the widow dies? And, if there is more than one child, is the pension split among the children?
     
  8. AnaTeresa

    AnaTeresa New Member

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    You never can tell with the internet, ha.
     
  9. mysteriew

    mysteriew A diamond in process

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    I thought the payments ended when the children turned 18?
     
  10. Show Me

    Show Me New Member

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    So did I, maybe they continue if child is disabled?
     
  11. Donjeta

    Donjeta Adji Desir, missing from Florida

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    There are 10 living recipients of benefits tied to the 1898 Spanish-American War at a total cost of about $50,000 per year. The Civil War payments are going to two children of veterans — one in North Carolina and one in Tennessee— each for $876 per year............

    Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/us/2013/03/20...#ixzz2O8T7hXgl

    That can't be right...?
    The Civil War ended 1865 so if someone who died in that one had a child the child would be at least 148 years old now. Or do they also include war veterans who died years after the war ended from complications of their wounds and might have got children years after the war?

    oh, never mind, I see it includes "to compensate those who have left military service"
    I suppose they might have had children several decades afterwards.
     
  12. Show Me

    Show Me New Member

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    Maybe he enlisted very young say 18 and married and had a child when he was in his 70's?
     
  13. STANDREID

    STANDREID A slacker when slacker wasn't cool

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    The article said that children of veterans receive benefits after 18 if they are disabled. I doubt that $876 a year makes much difference to a 93 or 83-year-old disabled person - probably just goes into the nursing home's pocket.

    Edit-One report says that the individual born in 1920 died last summer so there may be just one left.
     
  14. STANDREID

    STANDREID A slacker when slacker wasn't cool

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    I think it was 1955 when I saw a TV program about the last surviving Civil War veterans. It was on a show called You Asked For It. There were 4 left and they were all pretty frail, although, a couple of them were interviewed. The last died in 1959. Regarding You Asked For It, the show encouraged viewers to write in and request subjects that they would cover in a segment. The only two I remember are this one and the one about flying saucers.

    Three of the four were later debunked as per reports. The last verified veteran from either side was Albert Woolson, a union soldier, who died in 1956 at the age of 109.
     
  15. Reader

    Reader New Member

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    Another woman who does not receive benefits explains how she had a father who was a veteran of the Civil War:

    Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/us/2013/03/2...analysis-finds/?intcmp=trending#ixzz2ODznj3dQ
     
  16. AnaTeresa

    AnaTeresa New Member

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    If the child became permanently disabled before turning 18, the payments continue for life.
     
  17. i.b.nora

    i.b.nora I am polka dot

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  18. Show Me

    Show Me New Member

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    I like the website from UK too.

    Irene never married or had children and needed to move into a facility and was cared for. I'm glad she got assistance. Her brother ran off and later sold moonshine. Terrible the way he died trying to do the right thing. Not going to tell posters what it was about. Need to read Ibnora's link, unless someone else wants to tell what happened.

    The story is interesting! Genealogy is indeed amazing.
     
  19. 21merc7

    21merc7 New Member

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    Interesting.

    I am happy those benefits apply, to some degree.

    My dad didn't get those, not even for himself. 14 tours during Nam/Cuba.

    My sister didn't get any, even though she never applied, but I don't think they were ever available.

    I did know a lady in her 90's during the early 1990's. She worked for a sausage factory. She got lifetime health benefits and retirement. She would send me for her prescriptions, they cost her $1.75 no matter what. She said her doc visits were $5 at the most.

    That is the America I falsely believed in. Until Dad needed America. Then there was nothing. Just cost. Nothing he was told to help with health or finances.

    Happy some people still have it and can believe, regardless of their mental or physical circumstances.

    I thought only the 1950's gave the "Wipe It All Clean" promises. At least these folks actually receive them.

    Money - The Illusory God
     
  20. Reader

    Reader New Member

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    21merc7, I'm very sorry you father was denied any help after serving his country so long in the service. I'm not familiar with what the requirements are for financial assistance, but I always thought that veterans could receive health care at any veterans hospital. Very sorry how this situation affected you and your family's lives.
     
  21. i.b.nora

    i.b.nora I am polka dot

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    Here is the place to see if one qualifies and to also apply for a veteran's pension:

    http://benefits.va.gov/PENSIONANDFIDUCIARY/pension/vetpen.asp

    In addition to meeting minimum service requirements, the Veteran must be:
    Age 65 or older, OR
    Totally and permanently disabled, OR
    A patient in a nursing home receiving skilled nursing care, OR
    Receiving Social Security Disability Insurance, OR
    Receiving Supplemental Security Income

    Your yearly family income must be less than the amount set by Congress to qualify for the Veterans Pension benefit. Learn more about income and net worth limitation, and see an example of how VA calculates the VA Pension benefit.

    +

    From a cursory inquiry into how pensions were done during the Revolutionary War and the Civil War, it seems the requirements have remained pretty much the same to this day. Civil War pensions were distributed a little more liberally although it took the Southern State governments a while to get around to forming their own pension system.

    Sound familiar?

    "At the same time that pension requirements were becoming more liberal, several Southern congressmen attempted to open up the Federal system to Confederate veterans. Proponents justified such a move by noting that Southerners had contributed to Federal pensions through indirect taxes since the end of the war. These proposals met with mixed responses in both North and the South, but overwhelmingly, opposition came from those financially comfortable Confederate veterans and southern politicians who regarded such dependency on Federal assistance a dishonor to the Lost Cause. It should be noted that impoverished Southern veterans frequently were not averse to the prospect of receiving Federal pensions. In any event, no such law ever passed, and Confederate veterans and their widows never matriculated into the Federal pension system."
    — From: http://www.civilwarhome.com/pensions.htm
     

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