UT UT - Dylan Rounds, 19, wkg on farm, “weird run-in” with a guy walking on gravel rd, no phone & CC activity, Lucin, Box Elder Co, 25 May 2022

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Lusitana

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Dylan's mother said in one of the interviews that he had access to money in a bank account, but only withdrew a small sum each month. His biggest purchases were related to the farm. IMO, if he was into drugs, he would have used the money available to him.
How could this even be a question? He is an adult, who has been on his own living AND working for years. How and why wouldn't he have access to money? That makes absolutely no sense. This case is so strange, the way the family words stuff is just weird.
 

Limecat

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Summary of important information:
  • Dylan did drop out of high school to farm.
  • Dylan has a history of breaking phones and losing chargers. He was known to show up at CC's house unannounced in the middle of the night to get new chargers or buy a new phone.
  • His pistol and key fob are missing. His shotgun was found on DR's bed at his great-grandfather's house.
  • DR's pickup is registered to his dad, JR.
  • DR usually kept his pistol in his pickup.
  • Kurt worked on Dylan's farm and helped dig the irrigation pond. Kurt and his family also owned the Saddle Sore Bar. Kurt also helped search for DR. After the search, he called both CC and DR's grandmother to say DR was being held hostage somewhere in Montello.
  • Dylan talked with CC and JR about farming, animals, etc., but not personal stuff.
  • Dylan had a Snapchat.
  • Dylan would sometimes stay in Kurt's motor home near the Saddle Sore Bar when he got too tired to return home.
Some quotes from CC transcribed from the video above (BBM):

"He dropped out of high school to do this. Not of his father and I's liking, but he did it. That's been his everything, he lives, sleeps, eats, drinks, work. So Dylan did not walk away."

"I was lied to, I was told the boots were at the lab and there was blood on them." The host then asks CC if she knows for she it was blood, and CC responds "We do now, but when they told us on June 2nd, then, fastforward to that Saturday, [...] June 4th, Justin and I meet with detectives again and Justin asked them, 'Hey, what about the blood on the boots?' and it was just a deer in the headlights look. And they're like 'Oh, they haven't been to the lab yet.' So we were told the boots weren't even at the lab."

"Everything as far as criminal was dismissed. So then on June 4th we had friends and family, so many people come out to help us, I mean we had probably 250 people out there. We had no help from Box Elder County. [...] We had one deputy stationed with us that day, he stuck around for about two hours then he left, they didn't help organize any search efforts, they didn't talk to the people, it was all done by us."

"Dylan was famous for breaking phones. Breaking phones and losing chargers. But he finished his tractor work, so where I live, it's only 2 hours––not even 2 hours––he goes over the mountain and stock up on chargers, get a new phone, you know, in the middle of the night, you never knew until he was out in the driveway in his pickup."

CC is asked what was missing, and CC responds, "Dylan. And his key fob, and his pistol. That's it."

"All of his friends are in eastern Idaho where he did go to high school so no, there's no..."

The truck was in JR's name.

"That's why the the pickup is at the Idaho State Police is 'cause they [BECSO] allowed us to take it back, and so the Idaho State Police also reached out to help."

"We have information that we absolutely cannot release. It doesn't go back to any of this craziness that people have been hearing, and it is solid. It's solid."

DR usually kept the gun in his pickup.

CC says "it was just Don and Jim and Kurt" when asked if Dylan had any farm hands.

CC is asked whether she had talked to Kurt prior to Dylan's disappearance and she says, "No, nope. I knew who he was, and I knew Dylan was around him." "We'd go out to the farm, and Kurt was more in town in Montello, like I'd just go out to his farm."

"Tuesday, May 31st, Kurt was actually out helping us search. When he got back into town he called me, and he called me multiple times and I didn't answer 'cause I was on the phone trying to get some more help, and then [DR's grandmother] called and said 'Kurt has some information, you need to call him.' [...] Okay, so I get on the phone and I am told that Dylan is being held in this house in Montello and that this other gentleman gave CV a ride out there on Saturday, and it blows up into this 'maybe he's alive, he isn't, but this is where he's at. I got my brother watching the house, you know, we're not letting anybody leave.' Just mind-boggling. So I get on the phone and immediately try to get Box Elder County. No response. So then, in the meantime, Kurt calls me back again and he said 'well, it might be at a different house' but basically the same story. And I'm like 'where are you getting this?' and he's like 'well, this other gentleman personally told me that he,' and it's his house. The third phone call is with JR and I, Dylan's father, and at that point he's changed the story again that it might be at this other place but it's still the same two people."

"Elko sends out six people. They go search this gentleman's house. He and his mother let them search everything: open locked sheds, all the vehicles, on and on. Well, Elko, they come out, six deputies, they were in full force."

"The gun that was found was Dylan's shotgun. Dylan's shotgun was found, we were looking for it until I think it was Wednesday, when, Wednesday or Thursday, that Dylan's little brother went back and the shotgun was on Dylan's bed at the great-grandpa's place. So that's the gun that was found, was his shotgun."

CC is asked what Dylan has said about Kurt, and she responds, "That him and his family own the bar and they have karaoke on Saturday nights, and it's a place where he eats, so, you know."

CC is asked if Dylan was a private person or if he was open with her, and she says, "Oh yeah, he was just Dylan. He was just, you know, people say...I'm learning a lot, even from my aunt who is one of the school teachers, about all of his girlfriends and stuff. Dylan didn't talk to me about that stuff. Dylan talked to me about farming, same thing with his dad. That was, his dad and I, we all talked with him, talked about [unintelligible], talk about farming, talk about animals, and, that's what you talk about with Dylan."

"There is no grain silos on Dylan's farm."

When asked about whether Dylan had other shoes besides the boots that he wore when he would go out, CC responds, "Dylan didn't go out, guys. Dylan didn't go out. Dylan worked. That's like the video I put on FB on Christmas, that was Christmas of this year, at my parents, Christmas of '21, and he is in his work boots."

"I fully believe that all the people that were around Dylan know. It's too small. You don't go unnoticed. Strange things don't go unnoticed out there, how's that? Every winter that, you know, there's the Sun Tunnels there right on the way to Dylan's farm, and these people take walks out there [unintelligible]. Stuff doesn't go unnoticed. So people know, they're just not talking."

Dylan used Snapchat & FB, according to his mom who said she cross-referenced the "last snapchat on his phone, the last snapchat on my phone." "Nothing was deleted, everything was there. Every text message, every phone call from the last two weeks, you can pull that up from Verizon so, it was there, and there was nothing out of the ordinary."

CC is asked about whether Dylan stayed with Kurt, and she says, "So, a lot of times, you know, he'd go into town and hang out, he'd do the karaoke and, like I said, it's the only place you go, so when he'd go there and if he got tired, he'd just crash in the motor home. Nobody else lived in it, it was empty. It wasn't you know, it was just there."
Thank you for this. I did watch the whole video but was mobile and couldn’t take notes. Much appreciated!
 

kittythehare

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How could this even be a question? He is an adult, who has been on his own living AND working for years. How and why wouldn't he have access to money? That makes absolutely no sense. This case is so strange, the way the family words stuff is just weird.
It makes perfect sense in the context, which was the rumor of his receipt of a substantial cheque he had received in payment for contractual work.
It also makes perfect sense that his family investigated his finances in the course of their search for him and saw no anomalies suggestive of payments for anything untoward, like an expensive drug or gambling problem which may have led to his disappearance.
 

Limecat

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CV reached out to CC and told her himself.
And in this recent video she also said other people witnessed CV in Dylan’s truck. What hit me was she said she still does not know why Kurt phoned in the hostage “hoax” mess. So much doesn’t make sense. When CC says Dylan never goes out, but in the next breath says he was at the Saddle Sore bar and often goes there, why doesn’t she consider that going out? Clearly he socialized to some degree. I wonder if by going out she only means that he doesn’t drink or party (I must add my parents didn‘t think I drank or partied when I was 19 but they were sorely mistake). All MOO
 
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Re: the socializing thing, I think his mom may just be differentiating him from other people his age. Most of his peers are in college, and even the biggest social butterfly in an isolated area where the nearest town has two bar/restaurants isn’t going to party nearly as frequently as a college sophomore.

Also I’m sure there are many things about his life his parents didn’t know about, some of which may even be related to his disappearance, but I don’t think his parents are in denial or anything when they emphasize his focus on his work. If he was actually any good at farming, and it seems like he was, then that probably did take up a decent amount of his time. The farmers I’ve known worked long days that started very early.
 

Seattle1

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And, if he lives on the farm in Lucin "in season", what does he do the rest of the year, "off season"? Only farming-related things, such as equipment repair and other farming chores?

Trying to get a picture here is all.
^^rsbbm

Most farmers will tell you that it takes 5-9 years to achieve true profitability. Farming is a business, DR's chosen business, where the new season will require cash for seed, reliable equipment, being prepared for drought, infestation, etc.

In my experience, off-season finds most farmers scouting auctions for equipment, and/or rebuilding equipment, studying, reviewing what crops were profitable, and making projections for the future planting and rotation. Essentially, most are taking care of whatever was put on the back burner during farm season including bookkeeping and securing or renewing credit lines for next season. I don't see where DR would be any different.

I also believe off-season would likely find DR working on his dad's farm or other nearby farms that in addition to raising crops, also raise livestock. At only 19, he likely socializes with his lifetime friends-- maybe even sneaking beers to the shop or barn. Pictures of DR snowmobiling and hoverboarding and even among palm trees are also on social media.

My longtime farmer friend, coincidentally from Idaho, devotes a significant amount of his off-season to harvesting green trees that are shipped to Alaska for timely pre-Christmas delivery. Due in part to drought and fires in CA, I just learned that for Christmas 2022 & 2023, he'll be shipping exclusively to Costco.

I hope this gives OP somewhat of a picture of the off-season. MOO


 

carbuff

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A few of my main takeaways: when it comes to DR's personal life, CC seems to have incomplete information. She claims Dylan talked to her and JR about everything, but then says he didn't talk to them about personal things, only "farming" and "animals."

I also found it a bit weird how CC seemed to minimize the fact that DR would sometimes sleep in Kurt's motor home when he was at the Saddle Sore as "oh, he would just get too tired to drive home so he would stay there" as if it isn't significant that DR would spend the night somewhere other than his own trailer. IMO, it sounds like DR and Kurt had more than just a business or acquaintance-type relationship, as I can't imagine Kurt would let random people stay overnight in his motor home. Clearly Kurt had a level of trust in DR to allow him stay there.

Also, the fact that CC said DR used Snapchat was interesting. Hypothetically, if he was communicating with someone (or multiple someones) that he didn't want his parents to know about, Snapchat is the go-to app for that as messages are automatically deleted.

It is a bit unsettling to me that CC and JR were the first ones to comb through DR's phone. I completely understand them being the first ones to gain access to the information, as JR seems to have been the account holder with Verizon, but IMO them digging through the contents of the phone before LE will only help the defense if a person(s) is arrested in connection with DR's disappearance.

MOO.

BBM

This doesn't surprise me at all. I think it's pretty common for rural people.

My family (Montana) had a camper that we used a few times a year but spent most of its life just parked out beside a shed. Most of the people we knew had a camper or camp trailer for hunting or fishing, and it wasn't unusual for people to spend the night. Mom frequently let my brother's friends stay overnight when they were too "tired" to drive home or had been thrown out after a fight with their parents or whatever.

As far as I know, the camper's still there, though I don't know how long it's been since somebody slept overnight in it.
 

carbuff

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snipped...
You may not be familiar with how a lot of country boys (and country girls too) dress. "If I can't wear my boots, I'm not going" is a way of life for many.

Yeah, but I haven't known very many rural western types who didn't have a pair of good boots stashed somewhere in case they needed to go to a wedding or a funeral...
 

citizen_sleuth

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BBM

This doesn't surprise me at all. I think it's pretty common for rural people.

My family (Montana) had a camper that we used a few times a year but spent most of its life just parked out beside a shed. Most of the people we knew had a camper or camp trailer for hunting or fishing, and it wasn't unusual for people to spend the night. Mom frequently let my brother's friends stay overnight when they were too "tired" to drive home or had been thrown out after a fight with their parents or whatever.

As far as I know, the camper's still there, though I don't know how long it's been since somebody slept overnight in it.
I totally agree, I didn't mean that the empty camper was weird, but more so that CC seemed to just gloss over the fact that DR was known stay overnight in this man's trailer (a man who she said in the same interview that she had never met until after DR disappeared) when he was "too tired" to return home for the night (even though DR's trailer is only a ~30 min drive away).
 

carbuff

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I totally agree, I didn't mean that the empty camper was weird, but more so that CC seemed to just gloss over the fact that DR was known stay overnight in this man's trailer (a man who she said in the same interview that she had never met until after DR disappeared) when he was "too tired" to return home for the night (even though DR's trailer is only a ~30 min drive away).

Yeah, that's one of many things that seems to not really fit. Too many coincidences, too many unexplained loose ends, and they're all pointing in all different directions.

Dylan, where are you?
 

Seattle1

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It makes perfect sense in the context, which was the rumor of his receipt of a substantial cheque he had received in payment for contractual work.
It also makes perfect sense that his family investigated his finances in the course of their search for him and saw no anomalies suggestive of payments for anything untoward, like an expensive drug or gambling problem which may have led to his disappearance.

I agree @kittythehare. I also recall CC having to snuff out the idea DR was the victim of a $30K theft as one of her first challenges. (i.e., CC confirmed DR's check for combining services was banked, and no fraudulent activity was detected with his account since he was reported missing).

As the spokesperson for her son's suspicious missing person turned criminal investigation, I imagine her burden is growing more tremendous with every passing day.

IMO, one needs to treat CC's interviews similar to a primarily, circumstantial evidence case where the case is best understood when the evidence is accumulated, and not just focusing on a single piece of evidence or comment. Judging a single statement prior to refreshing for context seems a self-disservice. JMO
 

kittythehare

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I agree @kittythehare. I also recall CC having to snuff out the idea DR was the victim of a $30K theft as one of her first challenges. (i.e., CC confirmed DR's check for combining services was banked, and no fraudulent activity was detected with his account since he was reported missing).

As the spokesperson for her son's suspicious missing person turned criminal investigation, I imagine her burden is growing more tremendous with every passing day.

IMO, one needs to treat CC's interviews similar to a primarily, circumstantial evidence case where the case is best understood when the evidence is accumulated, and not just focusing on a single piece of evidence or comment. Judging a single statement prior to refreshing for context seems a self-disservice. JMO
You nail it, as usual.
This interview, full vid at end is way better
Via @MassGuy who also nails it frequently.
 

HongKongPhooey

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I agree @kittythehare. I also recall CC having to snuff out the idea DR was the victim of a $30K theft as one of her first challenges. (i.e., CC confirmed DR's check for combining services was banked, and no fraudulent activity was detected with his account since he was reported missing).

As the spokesperson for her son's suspicious missing person turned criminal investigation, I imagine her burden is growing more tremendous with every passing day.

IMO, one needs to treat CC's interviews similar to a primarily, circumstantial evidence case where the case is best understood when the evidence is accumulated, and not just focusing on a single piece of evidence or comment. Judging a single statement prior to refreshing for context seems a self-disservice. JMO
I agree with you. I think sometimes people forget the family are just human beings living their most stressful and frightening time ever. The situation is evolving, and they may well be learning new things about him too.
 

SuziQ

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And in this recent video she also said other people witnessed CV in Dylan’s truck. What hit me was she said she still does not know why Kurt phoned in the hostage “hoax” mess. So much doesn’t make sense. When CC says Dylan never goes out, but in the next breath says he was at the Saddle Sore bar and often goes there, why doesn’t she consider that going out? Clearly he socialized to some degree. I wonder if by going out she only means that he doesn’t drink or party (I must add my parents didn‘t think I drank or partied when I was 19 but they were sorely mistake). All MOO
AFAIK, he went there for a hot meal. In that area the Saddle Sore bar was his only choice. I don't know that I would call that socializing. Jmo.
 
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