VA - Bethany Stephens, 21, mauled to death by her 2 dogs, Dec 2017

Discussion in 'Up to the Minute' started by Gardenista, Dec 16, 2017.

  1. DakotaMayi

    DakotaMayi Former Member

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    Thanks for this SB. Eye-opening.

    As I said earlier, we have a spaniel who we love dearly... she's another of our children honestly. BUT... having said that, she knows whose in control, she sleeps in her own bed at night, not in our room, away from us, yes she is "baby'd" a little and she has never ever ever shown aggression and I cannot imagine her hurting a fly (literally... I mean one time, she actually ran into our house, up onto the chair and hid behind DH because a fly landed on her head in the garden) but that doesn't mean I don't think she is capable. I don't leave her alone with children or babies and I don't allow her to think "things are ok" because she's cute and fluffy. She has respect for us as we do for her.

    Also, I said earlier, we have had German Shepherds... same goes for them. Just because the dog is small (like my little King Charles) doesn't mean she is less capable than our Shep was.
     


  2. Vedder

    Vedder John 3:16

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    That's beyond adorable.
     
  3. JaneEyre

    JaneEyre Kindness matters - always

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    I found our rottie trying to lick a mouse back to life in her dog bed after the cats killed it. Miss that dog tremendously. Big freaking heart she had.

    Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk
     
  4. gitana1

    gitana1 Verified Attorney

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    Is there anyone saying those dogs shouldn't be put down? Of course they should. Just because some of us don't condemn an entire breed doesn't mean we don't think dogs gone bad should get a reprieve.
     
  5. gitana1

    gitana1 Verified Attorney

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    Any large dog can kill. Especially children. In a long-ranging study (14 years) of dogs who killed, Pitt bull weren't on the list at all:

    A study[SUP][6][/SUP] conducted at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School identified 74 fatal dog bites during the period 1966–1980 from news media and medical literature.
    Most fatalities were young children, including 23 infants under 1 year old. In most cases, the dog was owned by the victim's family. In only 3 of the incidents was the dog reported to have been provoked by kicking, hitting, or having stones thrown at it. However, several incidents involved a child attempting to pet or hug the dog.[SUP][6][/SUP]
    In 6 of the incidents, there was no information available about the kind of dogs involved. In ten fatal attacks, the dogs were only described as "mixed-breed".
    Many involved large and powerful molosser breeds: eight Saint Bernards, six Bull terriers, six Great Danes, two Boxers and a Rottweiler. In contrast to the time period covered other studies, the researchers found no fatal attacks attributed to any pit bulls at all.
    Spitz and primitive dogs committed a significant minority of the attacks, mostly sled dog breeds (nine Huskybreeds and five Malamutes), one Chow Chow and a Basenji.
    Fatal herding and working breed attacks numbered sixteen, twelve German Shepherd attacks, two collie attacks, and two involving a Doberman pinscher.
    There were multiple retriever attacks, including three Golden Retrievers and a Labrador, and two attacks by very small breeds: one Dachshund, and one Yorkshire Terrier, which is among the smallest of all dogs.[SUP][6][/SUP]

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fatal_dog_attacks_in_the_United_States
     
  6. Hatfield

    Hatfield Well-Known Member

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    This is a very educational thread and we all can take something from it.

    This is JMO
    I can recall a time when a child was teasing my Gram's dog who was just a regular mixed breed dog of no special breed. He was a mid size dog and weighed about 35-40 pounds.

    This dog was such a sweet baby type dog around adults. He was actually a scaredy cat type dog and if he heard loud noises or anything scared him he would go run and hide under the bed. LOL

    The only time I saw agression from him was when a young child was over visiting and this child was about 8 years old. She was teasing the dog by pulling its tail whenever it walked by. Luckily nothing bad happened but I noticed the dog would turn around and snarl at the child. Which really made perfect sense because I am sure the dog did not like its tail being pulled.

    The mother saw what was happening and got the child off the floor and put it in a seat so it could not bother the dog anymore.

    In thinking about that experience and hearing about how lots of attacks seem to be with young children I have to wonder if over the years dogs get it in their genes that children can tease and torment them. Just wondering about that because I have even seen on TV shows how its typically a child that would tease a dog in a movie or something so maybe there is something to that.

    Anyhow I agree with others about this incident. I think something happened where the dogs maybe had gotten into a fight with each other and maybe the owner tried to break up a fight.

    One thing I have witnessed is when you try to break up a dog fight you have to be extremely careful as it is very dangerous and very easy that the dog will turn on you instead. I think what happens is the dog gets confused and caught up with the excitement of the dog fight and when someone tries to break them apart they dont realize you are trying to help. For all they know you are there to join in the fight and hurt them too. That is JMO on it.

    And yes when dogs are in numbers the danger is much greater. I have seen on numerous occasions a small pack of strays come running through my yard and they are on a crazed mission for whatever they want to do. Nothing stops them from what they are doing. In my cases mostly just running about looking for another animal where they picked up the scent. If I call out to them to stop they just look up and sort of laugh at me and then go running off like I was not even there. So I am convinced that if a pack of dogs is attacking someone then the pack mentality takes hold and it is hard to stop an attack from multiple dogs.

    My advice if walking in areas where you are likely to run into a pack of aggressive dogs would be to have a weapon of your choice to at least give yourself a fighting chance.

    Anyway, great learning thread. There were some eye opening articles and I learned quite a bit from this thread. Thanks everyone.
     
  7. MelmothTheLost

    MelmothTheLost Well-Known Member

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  8. gitana1

    gitana1 Verified Attorney

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    My cat Baggins is a terrible cat. Black Manx monster. He acts like your dog. He has hit me several times with his paw and is super spoiled and dominant. Excessively dominant. Demands cuddling, demands play, demands everything. Very loud and willful. He has terrible temper tantrums. I think if he was a large cat he could easily kill me although it would probably be an accident!
     

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  9. Jax49

    Jax49 Florida Native

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    Apologies if already posted.

    People couldn’t believe two dogs killed their owner. So the sheriff described the horror.

    ​https://www.washingtonpost.com/news...-described-the-horror/?utm_term=.e3407bc36551

     
  10. terracotta

    terracotta Active Member

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    I was only questioning the dogs killing her because of the death threats and kennel doors pried open.It certainly would seem clear they did it. Now that the new details have come out about them being in outdoor kennels after being inside dogs and having her come visit them 5 days a week. That brings to the forefront a lot of stress that those dogs were under. That is hard enough for dogs to be left in kennels all day, it makes me utterly sad. I feel as though it would feel like prison would to a human.

    They get out on their walks with her, they are amped up. Also they are experiencing many outdoor sights and sounds that are scary, antagonizing (because they want to get out and venture after them) critters walking by and the frustration of not being able to get to them. They could have also been redirecting their frustration of not getting out after say a squirrel that runs by...and start attacking each other. Once they are taken out for their walks I'm sure their adrenals were surging. Once that happens dogs can't think logically, they become highly reactive to things around them. Many dogs also get very reactive and nervous at dusk and night. There are shadows and shapes that they are not used to seeing, and sounds seem to different to them.

    Transitions are so difficult on dogs, just like humans. So they need more exercise and structure to be able to handle it. I can imagine that they were confused, frustrated, anxious and pent up.

    Of course the hard thing about these breeds is they are no more aggressive than other breeds, but they have the unique structure and breed trait of attacking.That was what they were bred to do. So if one does get aggressive they do so much more damage. My poodle bit me so many times growing up. I think that was why I became a dog trainer. Of course she never bit me bad enough to even need stitches.

    Also an area not discussed is epigenetics. This area is fascinating and is amazing how what parentsand grand parents experience can alter the expression of genes.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/nati...6ca94801fac_story.html?utm_term=.4da0ea1dd969

    Which may be a basis for explaining some fears and anxieties.
     
  11. Jennifer17

    Jennifer17 Former Member

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    I had a cat like that. Most of the time he was the sweetest boy, but sometimes at night, when he wanted to go out and was not allowed out at night and he knew that he wasn't allowed, just when I would get up to go to bed, he would get the big dilated pupil, evil look and get between me and the doorway into the hall and attack my legs. I could usually get past him, but he used to scare me.
     
  12. Jennifer17

    Jennifer17 Former Member

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    But, she did the best she could for those dogs. Her living circumstances changed and she could not keep them but she went five times a week to tend to them. That is pretty good for a 21 year old, IMO.

    I have had children dump their dogs on me, and they did not come to see them or me, that many times a week.
     
  13. Spellbound

    Spellbound falsus in uno, falsus in omnibus

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    Article also states:
    Nothing that said domestic violence. Nothing that said she was stabbed. Nothing that said she was shot. No bones, no injuries to the throat area . . . There was no particular bleeding inside the esophagus, which would’ve been conducive with choking her out. None of that,” Whitlock told reporters.
    There is also no evidence that she had been sexually assaulted, authorities said.
     
  14. DevilDogMoM

    DevilDogMoM New Member

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    So if no blood in those areas of the throat...any guesses on mechanism of action that actually resulted in her demise? (Asking group, as well). I'm afraid we're all going down this trail without consideration to several red flags.
     
  15. Jennifer17

    Jennifer17 Former Member

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    What are the red flags?
     
  16. Jax49

    Jax49 Florida Native

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    Didn't they say in an early PC that her throat was injured? Are they now saying it wasn't???

    I'm so confused. moo
     
  17. JaneEyre

    JaneEyre Kindness matters - always

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    The issue with there being no injury to the throat confuses me even further. When dogs attack to kill, they go for the throat, at least with other animals from what I have personally seen. It is very odd to me that at some point they did not even touch the throat.

    Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk
     
  18. Jax49

    Jax49 Florida Native

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    From early on:

    https://www.dailystar.co.uk/news/wo...y-Lynn-Stephens-death-found-woods-mauled-dogs

    bbm
     
  19. JaneEyre

    JaneEyre Kindness matters - always

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    http://via.wtvr.com/tVQu5

    ETA Also in this article, a neighbor heard screams in the woods but blew it off!
     
  20. JaneEyre

    JaneEyre Kindness matters - always

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