Was Jane Austen poisoned by arsenic - and if so, was she murdered?

Discussion in 'Up to the Minute' started by wfgodot, Nov 14, 2011.

  1. wfgodot

    wfgodot Former Member

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    Very interesting piece, especially for Jane Austen devotees, and they are legion. (I'm not one, but probably only because I've not read much Jane Austen; give me the Brontë sisters any day!) While it's always important to approach information of this nature with a degree of skepticism (Poe, for example, is said to have died after being bitten by a rabid dog - well....maybe), things like this do provide a gateway to the past, and that in itself is important too.

    Jane Austen 'died from arsenic poisoning' (Guardian)
    Crime writer Lindsay Ashford bases claim on reading
    of author's letters and claims murder cannot be ruled out

    the rest at Guardian link above
     
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  3. Filly

    Filly KICKING AND SHINING

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    Interesting. My DD will have a field day with this.

    For the record I get the Bronte chicks and this woman mixed up. I seriously need to pick up a book.

    Poe? Rabid dog? Here in Philly?
     
  4. wfgodot

    wfgodot Former Member

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    Poe died after being found delirious in the streets of Baltimore. Much conjecture about what caused his death.
     
  5. 21merc7

    21merc7 New Member

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    I'm with you on the Bronte Sisters, never read Jane.

    How is 41 considered an early death given the time period? Everything else, I don't know, could have been for medication, could have been for hallucination, could be vitiglio, but it sounds more like the authoress is just using a few descriptive words for what she going through to me.
     
  6. badhorsie

    badhorsie Mouth operational, brain elsewhere...

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    The same allegations were made about Napoleon. I agree with the Professor.
    For some reason I never could get into Jane Austin, compared to the Brontes it seems like "Chick Lit"
     
  7. 21merc7

    21merc7 New Member

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  8. wfgodot

    wfgodot Former Member

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  9. 21merc7

    21merc7 New Member

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    I love it! Wonder what makes someone's eyesight good enough for this! :eek:

    http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2011/11/12/article-2060600-0EB7CB4200000578-446_468x286_popup.jpg
     
  10. Quiche

    Quiche New Member

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    Arsenic was also in facial and wig powders... it was all over the darn place.


    Although Austen has some merit, I agree with liking the Bronte's better. Austen always suffocated me with those English manners! It brought out my inner hippie-- throw off the conventions and run barefoot (blowsy)! :giggle:
     
  11. Nova

    Nova Active Member

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    Given the Austen revival of the past 20 years, I'm more than a little surprised to find so many posters expressing a preference for the Brontes. (I assume everyone means Charlotte and Emily, since Anne's work is more similar to Austen's.)

    Charlotte and Emily Bronte are Romantics. Anne Bronte and Jane Austen are Realists (which isn't to say there isn't plenty of romance (small "r") in Austen's books).

    But as for what is chick lit: what could be more "chick lit" than the dark and brooding Heathcliff stomping across the moor? Or Jane Eyre wandering through the snow in shock after discovering Rochester's secret?

    Personally, I preferred the Brontes as a teen; nowadays, I'm less impressed with brooding and wandering, so I prefer Austen. (A couple of great film adaptations of Emma helped.)

    ETA: None of them can touch George Eliot, one of the greatest writers and thinkers of the English language. IMO, of course.
     
  12. Cappuccino

    Cappuccino Well-Known Member

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    Me too, George Eliot rules.

    I do love Northanger Abbey though, surprisingly for a book written that long ago its laugh out loud funny in parts.
     
  13. Nova

    Nova Active Member

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    I haven't read it, Capp, so thanks for the recommendation. Actually, I think a lot of Austen is quite funny.
     

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