Well, it's about time!

Discussion in 'Up to the Minute' started by GreenEyedGirl, Feb 23, 2006.

  1. GreenEyedGirl

    GreenEyedGirl New Member

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    http://www.suburbanchicagonews.com/newssun/top/w22pitbulls.htm


    NORTH CHICAGO — The toughest pit bull law in Lake County was approved Monday by the City Council.


    Under the new law, all pit bulls on the streets, in addition to being required to be held on a short, 4-foot-long leash, must wear muzzles or "a muzzling device."

    Pit bull owners will be required to pay $500 annual license fees for one dog and $1,000 for two. Owning more than two will be illegal without special permission from the city animal control warden, Ted McClelland.

    The council unanimously approved the law after a hearing a series of pit bull horror stories over the past two years and conducting hearings on the problem.

    "This is a fairly strict ordinance but I think it's necessary," said Mayor Leon Rockingham.





    More at link.
    Thank goodness this is taking place. It's about time something was done to control this situation. Now, hopefully, more cities will follow suit.
     
  2. Jules

    Jules Former Member

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    :woohoo: :woohoo: :woohoo: :woohoo: :woohoo:

    :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap:

    Bout time!!! I pray this takes off nationally! It's a start anyway.
     
  3. GreenEyedGirl

    GreenEyedGirl New Member

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    Yes it is! And, a very good start, at that!! :dance:
     
  4. TheShadow

    TheShadow New Member

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    There needs to be SEVERE penalties for owners who let their pits escape their yard, with or without any attacks. These dogs must be kept on leash or in the yard at all times to protect kids, other pets and passersby. Hit the owners where it hurts - $200+ first offense and surrender the animal for a second offense.
     
  5. CyberLaw

    CyberLaw Former Member

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    This is what my province(like a state) did last year.

    The new Ontario law bans pit bulls anywhere in the province of Ontario and sets tougher penalties for the owners of any dog that poses a danger to the public. Current owners of pit bulls can keep their dogs, but the dogs must be leashed and muzzled while in public, and must be spayed or neutered. Owners are also prohibited from breeding or acquiring new pit bulls. It will be up to municipalities to enforce the law, and to identify which dogs are pit bulls.

    Of course the pit bull lovers were "up in arms" about this.....big time....oh well.

    Ontario was the first province in all of North America to actually ban pit bulls.
     
  6. GreenEyedGirl

    GreenEyedGirl New Member

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    :woohoo: Has it seemed to help with the pit bull attacks? I sure hope so! Good for Ontario for doing that. That's awesome!
     
  7. michelle

    michelle Joy comes in the Morning

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    I hope this saves some lives, I do not like those dogs!!
     
  8. H0NEYWEST

    H0NEYWEST I have a .38 and an ocelot ~ they're both loaded

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  9. Amraann

    Amraann Former Member

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    They don't tell the answer..

    But they do state that none of those are mixed breeds.
    The fact is that all to often bad backyard breeders or pit owners permitted much breeding across breeds so their dogs were not considered so dangerous.
    I am all for the idea of laws governing this dangerous breed.
     
  10. strach304

    strach304 New Member

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    Such a simple thing, very good idea imo. How about muzzling all dogs in public places though? You can't just single out one breed for instance the woman who was recently attacked by her own three dogs that were Rottweilers and chow mix and then there is the face transplant woman was torn up by a lab (shocked me). German Shepards, Huskies, Akita's, etc. and small dogs are known to be biters but because of their size don't cause the horror as some of these larger breeds. Don't misunderstand I love dogs but I think a muzzle is an excellent choice for prevention and also protects the owner. Is there any valid reasons for not having them wear a muzzle, medical or breathing for instance, something I'm not aware of?
     
  11. H0NEYWEST

    H0NEYWEST I have a .38 and an ocelot ~ they're both loaded

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  12. CyberLaw

    CyberLaw Former Member

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    One of the difference between regular dogs and pit bulls is the jaw.

    Pit bulls jaws are like vices, once they "bite you, they don't let go.

    So if a person is bitten by a regular dog, he bites, even if he does not let go, the jaws can be seperated.

    But not with pit bulls..........

    Actually I am happy that these dogs are muzzled. It certainly "eases" my anxiety when passing one on the street.

    I was bit by a dog when I was 8. The dog was eventually "sent away" to a farm(as the kids were told)but now I know that the "dog bought the farm". The attack on me was the second attack, and when the dog tried to attack a person running in the park.....while that was the third and last.

    All I was doing was walking with 3 other kids to the lake. The dog turned around and clamped on my leg. It took the other 3 kids with sticks and rocks to "make the dog" let go. The dog had pit bull in him "along with other breeds"

    I did have to go to the hospital. I still have the scar. I still remember it to this day.....

    If there is a pit bull loose on the streets, LE does not take the chance and "usually" has to shoot the dog. No if, ands or butts. You have a "deadly" weapon running lose on the street and the public must be protected.

    A family I heard of had a pit bull. It attacked their baby. The baby lost an eye. This family STILL kept the dog even after that. I don't personally know these people, but there is no way that a dog would come before my child.

    Not in this lifetime.......
     
  13. michelle

    michelle Joy comes in the Morning

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    A pit bull puppy which was still big but was about 1 year old, attacked my cousin while me and DH was there. Well needless to say I freaked out screaming :chicken: , and DH got the dog off of her I was surprised. I thought for sure she would get it good. She did have scratches on her and was bleeding but he sort of put his front paws on her shoulder and jacked her up against the wall almost like a person would grab you by the shoulders, well she could not get him off, he pinned her against the wall and my DH got him off. It was our friends dog and they were at our house, this was years ago and i knew then that pit bulls were like this but it wasnt as bad as it is today. We had no kids thank God at the time. I just dont like those dogs.
     
  14. Becba

    Becba Former Member

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    We had pit bulls when I was growing up. Wonderful loyal dogs. Both turned as they got older and had to be put down.

    We raised those dogs with tender loving care. My father raised dogs to sell and the pit bulls were raised as pets. At one time he had 27 dogs. Only the pit bulls ever acted out. I think it is a good step to go thru with this. Too many people have been disfigured or killed.
     

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