Who is GBC? An armchair psych discussion

Discussion in 'Allison Baden-Clay of Australia' started by Kimster, Jul 15, 2014.

  1. Opinionsgalore

    Opinionsgalore New Member

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    It wouldn't surprise me if he was involved with men as well, it's quite typical for an N, to them we're all just meat *bleugh*.
     


  2. Opinionsgalore

    Opinionsgalore New Member

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    I don't KNOW what the criteria is for a trait vs disorder, but I will go out on a limb and say that having empathy could well be the deciding factor. Disordered ones lack empathy if they hurt someone they don't feel bad, they don't suffer guilt at having caused pain - they get off on it - they see it as control and they won. A person with empathy feels bad for inflicting pain on another person, and feels moved to comfort the person and offer up an apology. Disordered ones don't apologise - unless they gain something for themselves from it.
     
  3. Opinionsgalore

    Opinionsgalore New Member

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    But those closest to Allison say it was Gerard who kept her from her friends, denigrating her and leaving a once vivacious woman with self-confidence issues.
    They said it was difficult to know what to say when Allison told them stories of how she was treated by her husband.
    “She put up with enough from him without having us lecture her,’’ one said.


    http://www.news.com.au/national/gera...-1226991524312

    Standard procedure for an N, to isolate their victim.
     
  4. Spotted Reptile

    Spotted Reptile New Member

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    Wow are you kidding me? The level of self-denial he must maintain is staggering to include a belief like that. Perhaps he had to venture out into the real world and see what others thought of him, and it's so shocked him that he's beat a retreat back to his cave of victimhood? Hard to imagine, isn't it. I wouldn't be surprised if he believes he's 'innocent' in that he's a victim and it's not his fault. That might translate into "I didn't REALLY kill her, it wasn't really murder, I just had to protect myself" etc.

    Or does he feel he still has to maintain the facade in front of the prison staff, in other words he just can't help being himself, i.e. a liar?
     
  5. jens

    jens Well-Known Member

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    He has to keep up the facade of innocence at least until his appeals are dismissed.

    My husband was on the jury of a murder trial years ago. They guy who committed the murder confessed his guilt to somebody, unfortunately for him it was to an undercover policeman. Apparently, often there is a need to tell somebody at some stage maybe years down the track.
     
  6. Snails

    Snails New Member

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    http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/personality-disorders/basics/definition/con-20030111

    "Definition
    By Mayo Clinic Staff
    A personality disorder is a type of mental disorder in which you have a rigid and unhealthy pattern of thinking, functioning and behaving. A person with a personality disorder has trouble perceiving and relating to situations and to people. This causes significant problems and limitations in relationships, social encounters, work and school.

    In some cases, you may not realize that you have a personality disorder because your way of thinking and behaving seems natural to you. And you may blame others for the challenges you face.

    Personality disorders usually begin in the teenage years or early adulthood. There are many types of personality disorders. Some types may become less obvious throughout middle age."
     
  7. Snails

    Snails New Member

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    And more here-

    http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/Personality+Disorders

    "
    Definition
    Personality disorders are a group of mental disturbances defined by the fourth edition, text revision (2000) of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) as "enduring pattern of inner experience and behavior" that are sufficiently rigid and deep-seated to bring a person into repeated conflicts with his or her social and occupational environment. DSM-IV specifies that these dysfunctional patterns must be regarded as nonconforming or deviant by the person's culture, and cause significant emotional pain and/or difficulties in relationships and occupational performance. In addition, the patient usually sees the disorder as being consistent with his or her self-image (ego-syntonic) and may blame others for his or her social, educational, or work-related problems."
     
  8. Total

    Total New Member

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    What are the chances GBC is oing to try something like this. I hope they give him only male psychologist

    Quoted from the Courier Mail 17 July, NSW news:
    .
    Bobbie Maree Bergmeier was guilty of professional misconduct. Picture: Facebook
    SHE thought he was “sexy” and wanted to be with him forever. The only problem was she was his psychologist and he was a convicted murderer.

    Bobbie Bergmeier met the inmate — who can be referred to only as Client A — after she began working as a psychologist at Junee Correctional Centre in the NSW Riverina region in April 2010.

    At the time, Client A was serving the final years of his 21-year sentence for murder and malicious wounding.

    The Health Care Complaints Commission (HCCC) alleges Ms Bergmeier began having intimate telephone conversations with him, declaring “she loved him and couldn’t wait to be with him” and “he was sexy and she wanted him forever”.

    She resigned from the prison job in August 2011 but continued to stay in contact with him, visiting his family and friends, and applying to be his sponsor for weekend leave.


    Client A was serving the final years of a 21 year sentence for murder and malicious wounding at Junee Correctional Centre .
    In a bid to cover up her relationship, Ms Bergmeier also used a colleague’s password to log into Client A’s case notes and change them to create “distance” between herself and him, the HCCC alleged.

    In a judgment handed down on Wednesday, the Civil and Administrative Tribunal NSW found her guilty of professional misconduct, saying she “has been involved in a serious boundary violation and placed her client at risk”.

    Although Client A was serving time for murder, the tribunal said he had been in jail all of his adult life with little opportunity to explore relationships.

    He was “needy and dependent and psychologically vulnerable”, it heard.

    Asked why she didn’t end the relationship when the stakes were so high, Ms Bergmeier told the tribunal her feelings were “so strong” that she didn’t think to.


    The relationship started in prison but Client A and Ms Bergmeier are believed to still be seeing each other. Picture: Thinkstock
    Ms Bergmeier said she accepted responsibility for her actions and acknowledged that what she did was wrong.

    She understood her conduct had breached her professional code of ethics.

    The tribunal cancelled her registration, saying: “Her insight into the seriousness of her conduct and its impact on her client, her colleagues and the profession as a whole remains questionable.” Client A was released on parole in March.

    Ms Bergmeier is now enrolled in a degree in primary school teaching at Charles Sturt University.

    It is believed the pair are continuing to see each other.

    Originally published as Psychologist ‘in love’ with jailed murderer
     
  9. Amee

    Amee Active Member

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  10. PrimeSuspect

    PrimeSuspect Under the Milky Way

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    GBC is appealing his conviction so he's never going to admit to killing Allison, he will want exoneration and compensation. He's just another Scott Peterson and Jeffrey MacDonald in my opinion.
     
  11. volunteer

    volunteer New Member

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    I have no doubt that if his appeal does not succeed in the court of appeal, he will then apply to the High Court to hear his case. All on the public purse! What do others think?
     
  12. Meryl12

    Meryl12 Active Member

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    If parents start teaching their children to avoid children who behave like this, then maybe they could save them from.... bullying at school.
    Then when they are older - how not to caught in an abusive relationship that they will need help getting out of.
    And when they are at the marrying stage of their life hopefully they will be aware of dangerous people........because there are a lot of them.

    I think the term used is ....functioning psychopath......and functioning sociopath........there are lots of them.
     
  13. Meryl12

    Meryl12 Active Member

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    I agree with what you say. I agree because his family unites with him and I am sure his family would encourage him to use every appeal process available because they think their BC name is being scandalised. I think his family encourages his delusions and convinces him he is right, because they want him to be right. They are as detached from reality as he is. As long as he has his family's support he will keep using every appeal process available to him. (In my opinion).
     
  14. Snails

    Snails New Member

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  15. Wolfinator

    Wolfinator New Member

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    Interesting reading. I've been lurking around this forum and have read quite a lot about PDs, narcissists, psychopaths etc.

    My arm chair psych assessment is that sometimes I think these are just academic synonyms for A-grade a-holes! Don't sugar coat it in an "illness".

    I think Al's brother kept it very real and said it best "I know you did it. You know you did it. And no amount of time you spend in jail will ever pay for taking her life"
     
  16. Snails

    Snails New Member

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    http://www.mcafee.cc/Bin/sb.html

    A. Repeated acts that could lead to arrest.
    B. Conning for pleasure or profit, repeated lying, or the use of aliases.
    C. Failure to plan ahead or being impulsive.
    D. Repeated assaults on others.
    E. Reckless when it comes to their or others safety.
    F. Poor work behavior or failure to honor financial obligations.
    G. Rationalizing the pain they inflict on others.
     
  17. BritsKate

    BritsKate Well-Known Member

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    I'm biased having literally lived with it but I will never accept a cluster B personality disorder as an illness. It isn't a get out of jail free card; it isn't a mitigating circumstance and it doesn't justify the actions of someone afflicted with a personality disorder - which are all too often at least dismissive or hurtful of others - if not flat out abusive and sometimes even lethal.

    A favourite quote: "Not all abusers are narcissists but all narcissists are abusive." Anyone who has ever had the misfortune of a personal relationship with one knows just how painfully true that statement is.

    MOO

    Please pardon errors as posted via Tapatalk with a less than stellar user.
     
  18. Ooohm

    Ooohm Well-Known Member

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    GBC "shaking violently" in the court room was IMO feeling the cold hand of Justice on his shoulder.

    What happens to a narcissist when a shaft of light, full self-awareness for a moment, is shone onto their personality? Would that bring pain?

    And to Consider, peace be with you. Even observing this Modsnip at a distance is disturbing...but at least we can love which is something of which he is incapable.
     
  19. Consider

    Consider New Member

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    Yes Ooohm

    Love reigns supreme. Xx

     
  20. Opinionsgalore

    Opinionsgalore New Member

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    The way I explained it to my sons was to trust their gut instinct, that if they see red flags don't ignore them, if they feel uncomfortable around someone then feel free to walk away - you owe them nothing. One of the key points is this - do they trust this person ? would you snoop around on your best friend or parent to find out hidden information - no, when you start feeling suspicious - when you feel the need to snoop, that's a bright red STOP sign - telling you not to trust the person.
     

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