Why are dogs leaping to their deaths?

Discussion in 'Bizarre and Off-Beat News' started by Hopeful One, May 29, 2012.

  1. Hopeful One

    Hopeful One Blessed are the cracked for they are the ones who

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    Just 12 months previously, Donna, her husband and son were walking their dog across the picturesque Overtoun Bridge in Milton, near Dumbarton, Scotland.
    Without warning, Ben leapt over a parapet on the century-old granite bridge and fell 50ft to his death on the rocks below.

    50 dogs in the last 50 years
    Other dogs have not been as fortunate. In the past half-century, some 50 dogs have leapt to their deaths from the same historic bridge.
    During one six-month period last year, five dogs jumped to their deaths.
    All of the deaths have occurred at virtually the same spot, between the final two parapets on the right-hand side of the bridge, and almost all have been on clear, sunny days.


    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-411038/Why-dogs-leapt-deaths-Overtoun-Bridge.html
     
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  3. LadyL

    LadyL Well-Known Member

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    so have other families walked their dog on a leash across that bridge and have those dogs strained at the leash toward the side or displayed any other remarkable behaviour at that spot?

    my guess is some kind of wildlife there is getting them excited because I can't think of anything more sinister that's logical

    either way, if I lived there, I sure wouldn't be walking my dog across that bridge and definately not unleashed

    eta: never mind my first question - I read the article & the answer is yes
     
  4. LadyL

    LadyL Well-Known Member

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    ok, I read to the end of the article

    it's the minks - they're after the minks
     
  5. Jan

    Jan New Member

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    Very strange. I wish the people had had their dogs on a leash so they couldn't jump.
     
  6. TrackerSam

    TrackerSam New Member

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    I think it's the haggis.
     
  7. not_my_kids

    not_my_kids New Member

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    Feedback signals from something is my guess. They would be able to smell another animal the whole length of the bridge, so they wouldn't jump at just one spot, in my opinion. I bet feedback signals that are heard by the dogs but not the humans, possibly from something as simple as a big microwave or a cell phone tower that is in just the right spot, with signals that affect or bounce off a part of the bridge.

    The idea that they are chasing animals is easier to believe, but I just don't think it's the truth...Call it a gut feeling, and take it as such.
     
  8. LinasK

    LinasK Verified insider- Mark Dribin case

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    I saw this featured on some paranormal show- wierd!
     
  9. Sonya610

    Sonya610 Former Member

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    So what are they going to do about it? Put up a higher fence in that area or at least post obvious warning signs? Also it sounds like some of these dogs may have been on a lead, if they suddenly jumped over the edge the drop weight of an 80 pound dog is hard to stop.
     
  10. Steely Dan

    Steely Dan Former Member

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    Maybe they want to get back what the mink stole? :waitasec:

    :silly:

    It could be a sound made by the swirling winds. It seems that removing the minks from that area and seeing if the dogs still try to do it would answer the mink question. JMO
     

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