Found Deceased WY - Gabrielle ‘Gabby’ Petito, 22, Grand Teton National Park, 25 Aug 2021 #3

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Diogenetic

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Yes I agree remember David Westerfield who murdered little Danielle Van Dam and traveled all over with her dead body in his motor home. GP’s van had no windows who would see her?
Certainly that is possible, and while one does not have to assume if he had killed her he would be rational, it seems a lot more rational to simply bury the body in the wilderness. Those are very large areas with some very far off the beaten path. Burying or just hiding a body there would be less risky than driving near 2,000 miles with a body
 

shelbycat

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I’ve been consumed by this for days. For reasons I may elaborate in the future but for the time being…this whole saga and where it has occurred is so familiar to me.

The altercation at Moonflower on the 12th. I have no speculation on what precipitated it but, I strongly feel this is where things went seriously wrong.

from the police report and the (limited) witness (singular!) report that has been made public, they were arguing over a phone and/or possession of the van at Moonflower on the 12th. (Police report does not mention the moonflower specifically but does mention coordinates that exactly align with that location)

they left the moonflower and proceeded north towards Arches National Park where they were pulled over. Policeman took BL to Seekhaven (we’re assuming he went to another location for the evening from there) and GP was left with possession of her van.

…reminder this was the evening of August 12th.

The 12th was also the day the IG posts of both GP and BL became suspicious. His..referring only to himself with bad camera angles…and here’s becoming rambling (typical of him, not her).

there’s also essentially radio silence on their SM between the 12th and at least the 21st.

something BIG….

… BIG.BAD.WRONG….

happened with them between the 12th and (at the very least) the 17th (when he supposedly flew from SLC to FL.
 

Harvath

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A lot of mentions of Brian's art and fascination with Chuck Palahniuk's "Lullaby" book, but I personally don't see the relevance. If he was a crime show buff, people would be obsessing on that and saying that makes him capable of thinking he can get away with it. His generation (and mine) love that edgy crap.

It sure is dark, but I'm 99.9% sure that in one of the social media pictures somewhere, Gabby was seen reading a book about the Zodiac killer. Sometimes a book is just a book.

Just depends on the individual and circumstances honestly. Almost at random. I read political thriller/spy novels all the time(thus my name on this forum was born). Doesn’t mean I go gallivanting off on spy missions over seas with exotic locals. Yet….Mark David Chapman had a copy/was very fascinated with ‘The Catcher in the rye’….and even most recently MacKenzie Lueck’s(also creepily took place in Utah) now convicted murderer self published a book about choosing a life of murder and sadistic crimes after witnessing some at a young age. Sometimes it doesn’t mean anything/red herring and other times it’s is a huge clue/red flag. Just something to take note of….as a possible cause for concern.
 
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FlowergirlinWard1

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Does anyone else think they might want to consider looking in the area of "The Zone of Death" if nothing shows up in Grand Tetons? It is located just outside Grand Tetons National Park, where they were last seen, on the Idaho side of Yellowstone National Park.

This stretch of Yellowstone National Park presents a unique loophole. It has been refered to by Brian Kalt in the Georgetown Law Journal as "The Zone of Death" when he wrote a piece called 'The Perfect Crime.'

Trials in Yellowstone National Park would be held at the federal courthouse in Cheyenne, Wyoming. However, in the 6th amendment it decrees that juries in federal criminal cases must be made up of citizens who are from both the district AND state where the crime was committed. This is where the loophole comes in, that area of the park in Idaho would have to be tried before a jury consisting entirely of residents of that area, and the trial would also have to take place in that area. Unfortunately, that Idaho portion of the park is uninhabited, making it impossible to make up a jury of residents of both the state and district. Any defendant facing a felony or misdemeanor charge would be unable to receive a constitutional trial which could not be legally punished regardless of guilt or innocence according to Brian Kalts writing.

I mention this because Brian and Gabby both seemed to be avided readers, they had books with them such as Lullaby, The Zodiac Killer, Fight Club etc. There is a great thriller book by CJ Box called 'Free Fire' it is based in this particular stretch of Yellowstone National Park and CJ Box even consulted Brian Kalt when writing his book. As it definitely falls into the genre that they seemed to enjoy reading and it was based in an area they planned to travel to, I wonder if one or both of them could have read that book.

Brian also seemed to be very aware of his legal rights and I wonder if it was premeditated could he have known about this strange loophole in that stretch of forest? Of course, this is all speculation and purely based on the genre of some of the books they were reading along with the very close proximity to where she went missing, it's a stretch but also an interesting coincidence. I hope something turns up or someone eventually cracks and her family can have some type of closure.
 

shelbycat

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Hey. Long time reader/lurker…lifetime researcher.‍♀️

I’ve been consumed by this for days. For reasons I may elaborate in the future but for the time being…this whole saga and where it has occurred is so familiar to me.

The altercation at Moonflower on the 12th. I have no speculation on what precipitated it but, I strongly feel this is where things went seriously wrong.

from the police report and the (limited) witness (singular!) report that has been made public, they were arguing over a phone and/or possession of the van at Moonflower on the 12th. (Police report does not mention the moonflower specifically but does mention coordinates that exactly align with that location)

they left the moonflower and proceeded north towards Arches National Park where they were pulled over. Policeman took BL to Seekhaven (we’re assuming he went to another location for the evening from there) and GP was left with possession of her van.

…reminder this was the evening of August 12th.

The 12th was also the day the IG posts of both GP and BL became suspicious. His..referring only to himself with bad camera angles…and *her’s becoming rambling (typical of him, not her).

there’s also essentially radio silence on their SM between the 12th and at least the 21st.

something BIG….

… BIG.BAD.WRONG….

happened with them between the 12th and (at the very least) the 17th (when he supposedly flew from SLC to FL.

*edited only the word here’s to her’s.
 

MKZoo

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His dad could have called her dad for help. He wasn't far away.

I keep thinking the same thing every time I consider the weird storage unit story. Surely a dad devoted enough to move his entire life to be closer to his child would gladly help transfer her belongings across town. And even if BL had the only key to the unit, spending $40 to FedEx it to the dads makes more sense than spending hundreds to fly home mid road trip.

I guess that’s why I don’t think the storage unit was the real reason for BL jetting home.

IMO.
 

Rocky1

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It may mean nothing, but after watching the Youtube video, I though it was odd that he's walking around with his hands behind his back. I could see if he was standing still, as many people do that, but who walks around with their hands behind their back? Trying to subconsciously hide something like his hands that he may feel guilty about using on his gf? Swollen hands perhaps?
I'm not saying he is, I just find it odd.
 

Beren

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It is hard to understand how any human being can stonewall to this extreme. He was the last person to see her.

How is this inhumane and cruel behavior not enough to charge him with something!? She was there with him. Now she isn’t and can’t be found. Common sense indicates him being silent is at least obstruction of justice? Endangerment? Form of abuse?

Have we really become so pathetic as humans that we can literally erase people as easily as erasing them from social media?
 

TGIRecovered

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Has anyone that knows BL come forward to be interviewed or make comments about BL's character? Nancy Grace type shows usually interview friends/past friends, maybe an ex? I just realized I still don't know anything about this guy.

Even if someone came forward and said what a wonderful guy BL was it wouldn’t make a difference to me.
Men who murder (MOO) their wives or girlfriends are often described as charming, popular, appear to successful appear to be generous kind and loving. It’s what’s behind the mask that counts. MOO
 

Vegasgrl

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Who paid for Gabby's hotel room for the week? Budget travelers usually do not have resources for a week in a hotel, especially if they're continuing on the trip. If she stayed for a week at that hotel by the airport, wouldn't that be at least $100 a night with taxes?
 

Vegasgrl

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Even if someone came forward and said what a wonderful guy BL was it wouldn’t make a difference to me.
Men who murder (MOO) their wives or girlfriends are often described as charming, popular, appear to successful appear to be generous kind and loving. It’s what’s behind the mask that counts. MOO
I agree. But, no one has come forward?
 

distracted

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Does anyone else think they might want to consider looking in the area of "The Zone of Death" if nothing shows up in Grand Tetons? It is located just outside Grand Tetons National Park, where they were last seen, on the Idaho side of Yellowstone National Park.

This stretch of Yellowstone National Park presents a unique loophole. It has been refered to by Brian Kalt in the Georgetown Law Journal as "The Zone of Death" when he wrote a piece called 'The Perfect Crime.'

Trials in Yellowstone National Park would be held at the federal courthouse in Cheyenne, Wyoming. However, in the 6th amendment it decrees that juries in federal criminal cases must be made up of citizens who are from both the district AND state where the crime was committed. This is where the loophole comes in, that area of the park in Idaho would have to be tried before a jury consisting entirely of residents of that area, and the trial would also have to take place in that area. Unfortunately, that Idaho portion of the park is uninhabited, making it impossible to make up a jury of residents of both the state and district. Any defendant facing a felony or misdemeanor charge would be unable to receive a constitutional trial which could not be legally punished regardless of guilt or innocence according to Brian Kalts writing.

I mention this because Brian and Gabby both seemed to be avided readers, they had books with them such as Lullaby, The Zodiac Killer, Fight Club etc. There is a great thriller book by CJ Box called 'Free Fire' it is based in this particular stretch of Yellowstone National Park and CJ Box even consulted Brian Kalt when writing his book. As it definitely falls into the genre that they seemed to enjoy reading and it was based in an area they planned to travel to, I wonder if one or both of them could have read that book.

Brian also seemed to be very aware of his legal rights and I wonder if it was premeditated could he have known about this strange loophole in that stretch of forest? Of course, this is all speculation and purely based on the genre of some of the books they were reading along with the very close proximity to where she went missing, it's a stretch but also an interesting coincidence. I hope something turns up or someone eventually cracks and her family can have some type of closure.
I think anything is possible at this point.
 

Artis

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I think you nailed it. He flew home because the relationship was on the rocks, and his behavior post disappearance makes absolutely no sense.

Really. He flies home, she - what? - begs him to come back so he flies back, kills her and drives her van back to Florida? Or, she begs him to come back, he does, they fight more, decide to call it off an return to Florida, together, some big blowup happens and he kills her on the journey home? That's the only way him driving that van back there makes any "sense" to me.
 

mlhenn

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Unraveling Gabby Petito mystery: Legal experts say looking into her mindset could lead to bringing Gabby home | WFLA

Investigators describe this case as unraveling a mystery with many pieces to this puzzle.

It is a mystery in the truest sense because you have no idea. You can’t go into a situation like this assuming you know how it’s going to play out because, really, you don’t,” said private investigator, John Allman.


He says, right now, one of the biggest questions that needs answering is what was the mindset of Gabby when she was last seen.

“By trying to understand the mindset of an individual when they were last seen by people is critical because it can tell you if they have been looking to escape, to go somewhere by themselves,” Allman asked.

The former investigative reporter also knows that in asking the question, where’s Gabby, there are many possible answers.

Former federal prosecutor Stephen Crawford agrees.

The longtime Tampa attorney, now in private practice, says there’s a lot of work for detectives.

He also said since Gabby’s fiancé is simply a person of interest and has hired an attorney, the young man cannot be compelled to talk.

“This is a case that if it turns out, unfortunately, the way it’s looking, it’ll be prosecuted locally wherever they find what they find,” said Crawford.
 

Harvath

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The weird thing to me is that even murderers usually pretend the person just took off or went missing. They say something. If he just dropped her off on the side on the road and left, why not say something? He has to know they will be looking at his phone pings to follow his path. Maybe he is just trying to delay her being found so that evidence has time to deteriorate to the point that it’s hard to determine what happened?

MOO

On the contrary and I certainly mean no disrespect to you by this….but I doubt it. Most average individuals….even millennials(like me) or gen z below us. As technologically advanced as we are….I don’t think most are aware of cell phone pings etc not unless they follow LE/True crime or are just well read. I think the general thought is don’t commit a crime with technology around…..but it’s more just like the boogyman to most imo. That’s just from my perspective as I’ve viewed others around me as well as individuals in other cases. Just like Delphi where they recorded the perpetrator and even the phones were found near the crime scene. Clearly the suspect didn’t understand the advanced technology and what phones can do to “tell on you”. As usual don’t underestimate a killers amazing ability to be just lucky and far far from intelligent or conniving.
 
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mlhenn

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Strategy behind the person of interest not talking in Gabby Petito case

“I think a lot of people think if someone asserts the fifth amendment, the right to remain silent, or the sixth amendment, the right to have an attorney, that they're hiding something” says defense attorney Greg Skordas, who has no involvement in this case.

Skordas says from a legal standpoint not talking has its advantages.

“I think it's smart for this attorney to say look my client is not hiding anything I'm advising him not to speak at this time and he's willing to follow my advice at this time” Skordas says.

Skordas says there can be a time when a person of interest will want to talk to police adding “he's not saying we won't give a statement ever maybe down the road there will come a time when there will be some quid pro quo and they'll talk with the government and say look we'll give a statement but we want some concessions as to what that will do and how that will be used in the case.”
 

Beren

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Even if someone came forward and said what a wonderful guy BL was it wouldn’t make a difference to me.
Men who murder (MOO) their wives or girlfriends are often described as charming, popular, appear to successful appear to be generous kind and loving. It’s what’s behind the mask that counts. MOO
Agreed.

In a way this sociopathic silence/stonewalling is so much scarier to me than a violent wife beater. The lack of empathy or guilt or anything remotely human in light of the suffering of so many of GP’s loved ones, let alone whatever may have happened to HER, is scarily astonishing. Staying silent for self-preservation at what cost? How does one go from crazy in love to this in a matter of a few months? What does anyone really know about another?
This is starting to depress me.
 

Beren

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Strategy behind the person of interest not talking in Gabby Petito case

“I think a lot of people think if someone asserts the fifth amendment, the right to remain silent, or the sixth amendment, the right to have an attorney, that they're hiding something” says defense attorney Greg Skordas, who has no involvement in this case.

Skordas says from a legal standpoint not talking has its advantages.

“I think it's smart for this attorney to say look my client is not hiding anything I'm advising him not to speak at this time and he's willing to follow my advice at this time” Skordas says.

Skordas says there can be a time when a person of interest will want to talk to police adding “he's not saying we won't give a statement ever maybe down the road there will come a time when there will be some quid pro quo and they'll talk with the government and say look we'll give a statement but we want some concessions as to what that will do and how that will be used in the case.”
This may be true if the only concern is oneself and I hope most humans have concerns other than just about oneself.
 
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