Found Deceased WY - Gabrielle ‘Gabby’ Petito, 22, Grand Teton National Park, 25 Aug 2021 #85

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JerseyWasHome2

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Ok, so it's the Daily Mail and we all know they aren't the best at accuracy but this is in quotes which is supposed to mean it's verbatim. I can be a bit 'literal' at times and miss subtleties, still, this reads like she's baking an actual cake. ;)


"Riley claims that the newly surfaced letter could help prove the Petito family's case against the Laundries.

'There's no date on the letter but it appears to have been written between the time that Gabby was murdered and Brian committed suicide,' Riley said. 'There are scenarios presented by Roberta, for example, 'if you go to jail, I'll bake a cake and put a knife in it or saw in it.'"
I wonder if the L's felt their house could be bugged so could not talk freely inside it, so they perhaps communicated on paper until BL disappeared, meaning, the letter could have been written after BL returned home.
 

TL4S

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Ok, so it's the Daily Mail and we all know they aren't the best at accuracy but this is in quotes which is supposed to mean it's verbatim. I can be a bit 'literal' at times and miss subtleties, still, this reads like she's baking an actual cake. ;)


"Riley claims that the newly surfaced letter could help prove the Petito family's case against the Laundries.

'There's no date on the letter but it appears to have been written between the time that Gabby was murdered and Brian committed suicide,' Riley said. 'There are scenarios presented by Roberta, for example, 'if you go to jail, I'll bake a cake and put a knife in it or saw in it.'"
That quote comes from Reilly's interview with Brian Entin, so it's good. I also wondered if I was taking it too literal, but I don't think we are!
 

Warwick7

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I have always thought BL murdered GP in the van some time after lunch on August 27th. I believe he hung around for two days. It seems to be his MO; he walks away when he doesn't like the situation or if GP isn't behaving as he wanted. I always wondered why he just didn't drive to Coulter Bay? Why hike? I always thought because an injured/deceased GP was left in the van. He tried to escape the situation, but really had nowhere to run. Maybe it was his parents that told him to come home?? Don't know. Her body was put where she was found because both of them probably had camped there at that spot in the days prior. He would take her somewhere familiar. His note doesn't really line up very well with the evidence I have heard. I think he writes about his own pain. I imagine his feet hurt from hiking in the Tetons for two days, and his wrist hurt from carrying her body across the Creek. I don't understand why she had her hiking shoes near her body, which makes his story even more fantasy. It keeps leading me back to her being beaten in the van on August 27th.
This post is such a great thought process.
Someone on WS early early on came up with the idea, the reason for taking off on foot for two days, was he wanted to set the scenario that:

1. he had been hiking on his own and Gabby who stayed at camp, was killed by an intruder.

2. the other scenario was he left on his own and Gabby took the van and abandoned him.

3. the other scenario was Gabby took the keys and left with other people. Now leaving him on foot.

All of these I thought at the time were very plausible.

However, for some reason he went back to camp, took the van, faked live Gabby texts and left for his parents.

MOO, if anyone of these are correct, someone told him to just knock it off and get home!
 

Warwick7

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I wonder if the L's felt their house could be bugged so could not talk freely inside it, so they perhaps communicated on paper until BL disappeared, meaning, the letter could have been written after BL returned home.
BAM! I could see this easily taking place! Becaus3 unless we are presented with proof of anything being mailed---I still suspects he arrived home and the letter was sitting on his pillow where he would be sleeping, sitting on a desk or handed to him.
 
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Warwick7

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John Kelly, a criminal profiler and psychotherapist, and Jason Jensen, a private investigator, also called Laundrie's version of events 'farcical.'

And, even if he did kill Petito out of mercy: 'Euthanasia is not legal in any state, anywhere. Euthanasia is murder.'

Kelly also told FOX News that he was frustrated that Laundrie 'tiptoed around the confession.

'He wanted to serve it up as a mercy killing.

'That's the thing that's bugging me more than anything,' Kelly said. 'He found her breathing heavily and gasping for breath, so he decided to choke her out?'

He continued to say that it made no sense that he would strangle Petito on the spot rather than drag her back to their van to get some help.

'I don't believe in all this accident stuff, because how can you say you love somebody so much, you can't go on without her, you love her so much you're willing to commit suicide like a Romeo and Juliet?

'She's hurt, and will not go and get help for her.

'And not only will you not go the extra mile,' he said, 'you will not even report her missing.'
……
Jensen also said he found Laundrie's story suspect, saying: 'He writes this farcical tale about her falling down and getting injured while crossing Spread Creek, and describes how he couldn't leave here behind.'

He called the notebook passage 'an attempt to rewrite history.'

'The truth is he killed her because he was a domestic abuser,' Jensen said. 'He strangled her, and had done so before.'
…..
'The only thing I give him credit for, in any way, is he decided to get eaten up by animals himself,' Kelly said.

Thanks @steeltowngirl ! I love good ole fashioned getting to the point!!!
 

JerseyWasHome2

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BAM! I could see this easily taking place!
I recall there was a camera aimed at the back of their home that LE installed with a neighbor's permission. I don't know the legalities of that - can they place surveillance on a home if the owners of the home aren't being accused of criminal behavior without their permission, if BL wasn't even charged yet? But aside from that, I wonder if such cameras can have high power microphones attached to pick up conversations as well.
 

Warwick7

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Random thoughts:

I think the person who wrote that crazed fiction about Gabby's murder is capable of writing an equally crazy, equally fictional letter purporting to be from his mother offering to help him later, basically giving himself permission to do what he either wanted to do or had already done.
I could totally agree with this.

I think we are going to see writing experts come into play.

I want to see the other confessions. (plural)
 

Skigirl

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I recall there was a camera aimed at the back of their home that LE installed with a neighbor's permission. I don't know the legalities of that - can they place surveillance on a home if the owners of the home aren't being accused of criminal behavior without their permission, if BL wasn't even charged yet? But aside from that, I wonder if such cameras can have high power microphones attached to pick up conversations as well.
I don't think you have a reasonable expectation of privacy in areas of your property that are observable from a public right of way or a neighbor's house, and so I'm pretty sure that if someone grants permission to place a camera at their home it's totally legal. MOO.
 

Sundog

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I don't think you have a reasonable expectation of privacy in areas of your property that are observable from a public right of way or a neighbor's house, and so I'm pretty sure that if someone grants permission to place a camera at their home it's totally legal. MOO.

But I don't think the same applies to a listening device?
 

Skigirl

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Your point about shipping overnight on the weekend cannot be ignored. While it is available through the USPS's Priority Express (which includes Sundays and holidays), from what I can find, that is only available in larger metropolitan areas.

Riley says the letter appears to have been written after GP died, and he states he was led to believe BL got the letter before he arrived back in North Port. These are not definitive facts, of course, but if this is what they believe, then the letter had to be sent to somewhere for BL to receive it, it had to have been mailed and picked up between Aug. 28 and Sept. 1, and no matter how much it doesn't make sense, it had to happen (if their timeline is correct).

If BL killed GP on the 27th, he chose to hang around the area for at least two more days. Why? It sounds good that he was waiting for a package delivered to Jackson, but maybe he wasn't. Maybe the package was going to be mailed to another location along his route home and he was waiting to time his arrival on the right day. He could have picked up the letter at any point, including as late as Sept 1. Maybe the letter was never even mailed, but left at some location in FL, where he could pick it up before he got home. Maybe this was all an attempt to communicate without being traced. IDK. It sounds ridiculous, but the dates are what Riley provided, not ones we are making up.

So much of this lawsuit goes against the direction I have tended to lean towards in regards to the Ls knowledge, but as has been pointed out, what the lawyers are saying, and the claims being made, have yet to be substantiated publicly with evidence. However, that doesn't mean the evidence isn't there, we just don't know.
FWIW, you can definitely drop off at Fedex on a Saturday for an overnight delivery that would be recieved on a Monday and I checked and there were a number of courier shops open on Saturday in easy distance from the Laundrie residence and the Fedex shop in Jackson Hole also has Saturday service. And you don't need a shop, you only need a dropbox. A package sent overnight on a Saturday does not wait to go out until Monday, as long as you send it before the last pickup of the day (a Monday delivery would be considered "overnight"). And if you pay a bit more, you can have a package delivered by 9 AM.

I say this as someone who has used Fedex and UPS way more than I'd like, from rural and urban areas alike. I believe same for USPS overnight, but I'm less sure about the latter since I use the first two much more often.
 

TL4S

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FWIW, you can definitely drop off at Fedex on a Saturday for an overnight delivery that would be recieved on a Monday and I checked and there were a number of courier shops open on Saturday in easy distance from the Laundrie residence and the Fedex shop in Jackson Hole also has Saturday service. And you don't need a shop, you only need a dropbox. A package sent overnight on a Saturday does not wait to go out until Monday, as long as you send it before the last pickup of the day (a Monday delivery would be considered "overnight"). And if you pay a bit more, you can have a package delivered by 9 AM.

I say this as someone who has used Fedex and UPS way more than I'd like, from rural and urban areas alike. I believe same for USPS overnight, but I'm less sure about the latter since I use the first two much more often.
For sure, if he didn't leave until mid-morning Monday, that could be an option.
 

JerseyWasHome2

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FWIW, you can definitely drop off at Fedex on a Saturday for an overnight delivery that would be recieved on a Monday and I checked and there were a number of courier shops open on Saturday in easy distance from the Laundrie residence and the Fedex shop in Jackson Hole also has Saturday service. And you don't need a shop, you only need a dropbox. A package sent overnight on a Saturday does not wait to go out until Monday, as long as you send it before the last pickup of the day (a Monday delivery would be considered "overnight"). And if you pay a bit more, you can have a package delivered by 9 AM.

I say this as someone who has used Fedex and UPS way more than I'd like, from rural and urban areas alike. I believe same for USPS overnight, but I'm less sure about the latter since I use the first two much more often.
For what it's worth, I shipped a small box to someone who lives about 6 hours away from me overnight via the USPS a few months ago. I used the appropriate box and label. I absolutely wanted it there next day. I arrived at USPS when they opened. The employee said, "2 days." Huh? He said the overnight guarantee went out the window awhile back with all the USPS issues the country has experienced. He actually said, "I can guarantee that'd arrive in California tomorrow, but I can't get it to Pennsylvania tomorrow." Even though I am on the east coast as well. He insisted there is nothing I could do to make that box arrive there at any point the next day.

That said, I just find it hard to believe BL's mother would snail mail something to him which would cause him to hang out in Wyoming longer than need be. What if got lost in the mail? They could have spoken on the phone. Phone calls aren't recorded by our providers. It'd record that the call was made and received and the length of time, but what they talked about wouldn't be tracked, esp as this was before he was a suspect so no one was monitoring his movements or phone.
 
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karen in New York

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Pretty much agree. Trying to make sense of the timeline (or anything else, for that matter) is impossible. I did NOT see that mercy killing story coming, nor a letter from RL, regardless the timing. It's all so very, very odd.

Stepping back and trying to look at the big picture, I begin to feel like, as you've said, there were concerns among some of the adults that the relationship was troubled. Perhaps the Ps and Ss didn't see it because of the literal physical distance, but seemingly RL had worries. And rightfully so.

I think possible DV, drug use, immaturity, cramped living conditions, and mental health issues all combined in a toxic mixture of trouble that neither of them were prepared to deal with.
I''ve also found it very odd that a young woman would buy a van that she was not comfortable driving and proceed with a trip in the van that relied on someone else being the driver. I can't wrap my arms around that.
 

TL4S

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I''ve also found it very odd that a young woman would buy a van that she was not comfortable driving and proceed with a trip in the van that relied on someone else being the driver. I can't wrap my arms around that.
No criticizing intended on GP, but I think it stemmed from the daydreaming of a young woman hungry for adventure and recognition. And she maybe viewed BL as a partner, so no need to think things through any further than that. Again, I'm not being critical. I remember being in my early 20s. The whole thing was certainly obtainable, but in hindsight, we can see they were probably in over their heads. Too many other significant factors at play. Jmo.

Even mature adults can make decisions and not expect the unexpected. Just think what might have been had the Moab stop been their parting of ways...sigh.

In the end, no matter what BL wrote in his confessions, or whether or not the Ls knew what happened, the real tragedy is that GP's death wasn't prevented. And I'm not taking a stance on the politics of DV and such, I'm just sad that things spiraled out of control like they did.
 

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Does anyone believe that when BL left Wyoming, his plan was to spend some time with his family and then die by suicide, as his note implies?

I do not. I don't think it's a coincidence that he left for the Preserve two days after her mother made the initial police report and the very day of her mother's first public press conference.
 

Skigirl

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I''ve also found it very odd that a young woman would buy a van that she was not comfortable driving and proceed with a trip in the van that relied on someone else being the driver. I can't wrap my arms around that.
Maybe she thought she would get used to it, but he didn't mind doing the driving (or, like my husband, preferred to be the driver) and she didn't really spend enough time behind the wheel for it to become natural.
 

MountainGal33

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If it acts like a cold-blooded murderer, and writes like a cold-blooded murderer, it's a cold-blooded murderer. He can't even admit in his diary he killed her instead making himself the Savior of Gabby....you cannot get a better example of the delusional mind of a narcissist (in my opinion).

And the experts in this article agree:

 

bestill

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Does anyone believe that when BL left Wyoming, his plan was to spend some time with his family and then die by suicide, as his note implies?

I do not. I don't think it's a coincidence that he left for the Preserve two days after her mother made the initial police report and the very day of her mother's first public press conference.
You make a great point. I suspect the time frame from when her murder occured to when her mother reported her missing was eating him alive. If may have given him a very false sense of hope that he may get away with it. I also believe that he hung around the area to figure out what to do, create some type of timeline for himself that was separate from her.

If he planned to die by suicide, as his note indicates, he would have done it in Wyoming. He died by suicide because he couldn't face the punishment for her death by his hands. And to be candid his family would have been better off if he had done it in Wyoming. They would have probably gotten much of the sympathy that their attorney is now trying to manipulate for them. Once again - all my opinion.
 

karen in New York

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Maybe she thought she would get used to it, but he didn't mind doing the driving (or, like my husband, preferred to be the driver) and she didn't really spend enough time behind the wheel for it to become natural.
Maybe. But she had no way of escaping or leaving if she was threatened or for her own safety. I hope she never had to worry about being stuck with a out-of-control partner in a wilderness environment.
 
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