AK AK - Steve "Smiley" Keel - TN Resident Missing From Hunting Trip - North Slope

MelInTN

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https://m.facebook.com/story.php?st...49WueK18vjSX7SK9k3CBfszHzl&id=100044302692250

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***UPDATE: MAN FROM DOVER, TENNESSEE MISSING IN ALASKA.
Steve "Smiley" Keel is well-known in Stewart County.
He is an electrician from Dover ... married with three grown children.
Keel is a 61-year-old Marine veteran and avid outdoorsman.
He went to Alaska with a friend to hunt Caribou.
They were camping in a rough, remote area in northern Alaska.
The men shot two caribou and stored them a quarter mile away to keep bears away from the campsite.
Last Saturday morning, the friend told authorities that Keel left the campsite to go cut some meat from the caribou and he never returned.
The friend then reported him missing.
He apparently never made it to the caribou.
SO WHAT HAPPENED?
It's a mystery.
Search and rescue efforts since have found no trace of Keel....' more at link.

I live in the community that Steve lives in and his wife and kids are frantic. He is a well loved man who enjoys hunting. I've been waiting for it to hit media. Prayers for the Keel family!!!

Thread #1
 
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MadMcGoo

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MOD NOTE:

Multiple comments have been removed from the previous thread due to numerous rule violations. Please continue the discussion of Smiley’s case HERE.

Here are a few general RULE reminders before we open the new thread:

- Websleuths is a victim-friendly forum. Attacking or bashing a victim is not allowed. Discussing known victim behavior, good or bad, is fine, but do so in a civil and constructive way, and only when such behavior is known to be relevant to the case. Stating that a victim died due to their own actions when there has been no authorized LE or MSM source to support such a statement is simply not okay.

- These are the RULES concerning social media. There are several pages allowed to be linked and discussed. However, the following applies to even those: Comments and posts by readers/visitors of these pages are not allowed to be linked, quoted, copied or referenced. They are considered rumors. Just don't mention them.

At this time, CS (Chet) and any of their social media accounts and/or videos have not been approved as sources here on Websleuths. They and their contents are off limits.

- ANYTHING you post as a fact MUST include a link to that info in the mainstream media (MSM) or a statement by law enforcement (LE). If you can’t link it, DON’T post it. We don’t have moderators online 24/7, so if we don’t see a violation for several hours/days/weeks and dozens of members have replied to that comment, it results in those responses being removed as well. We rely on and appreciate when members report TOS violations rather than replying to them.

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- Mad
 

WingsOverTX

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Continuing from the last posted questions from @5W’s, I have the same question, does anyone have a credible link to something saying the caribou meat was dumped into a pond or was that conjecture??
The only "proof" I could find was a quote by CS earlier in the thread. And we cannot share his social media. Like so many things that are probably true, a WS-acceptable source to prove or disprove is hard to impossible too find despite my trying.

Because such an action is illegal when hunting on tundra, we are unlikely to find out unless AST or the Borough issue fines or a report.
MOO
 

5W's

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The only "proof" I could find was a quote by CS earlier in the thread. And we cannot share his social media. Like so many things that are probably true, a WS-acceptable source to prove or disprove is hard to impossible too find despite my trying.

Because such an action is illegal when hunting on tundra, we are unlikely to find out unless AST or the Borough issue fines or a report.
MOO
If there was no fine issued anf no report then it may mean it didn't happen. Being experienced hunters they wouldn't do this. Could it be that what he said was misconstrued and it wasn;t a body of water but the pack that was left by Steve?
 

WingsOverTX

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If there was no fine issued anf no report then it may mean it didn't happen. Being experienced hunters they wouldn't do this. Could it be that what he said was misconstrued and it wasn;t a body of water but the pack that was left by Steve?
Give it time. He went missing at the end of August 2022. It wouldn't surprise me if fines or a report are not issued for six months or a year, if ever. I'm sure at least one of the authorities will be doing a debrief. Whether the public will have access to it is an open question.

I wouldn't be surprised to see some signage go up on the Dalton informing hunters to check in with the BLM or somesuch.

I am sure the costs of this search were high enough that prevention of a repeat is a goal of several responding agencies/authorities.
JMO
 

5W's

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Give it time. He went missing at the end of August 2022. It wouldn't surprise me if fines or a report are not issued for six months or a year, if ever. I'm sure at least one of the authorities will be doing a debrief. Whether the public will have access to it is an open question.

I wouldn't be surprised to see some signage go up on the Dalton informing hunters to check in with the BLM or somesuch.

I am sure the costs of this search were high enough that prevention of a repeat is a goal of several responding agencies/authorities.
JMO
I cannot assume that experienced hunters will throw any meat into any body of water anywhere. I can see a fine for the pack being left by Steve, though, but at the same time it was left there to guide Steve back to camp if he came back at all past that pack. It could also be that the fine would be for leaving the caribou meat unattended in the first place, however. I can see this being an issue with the authorities. But how long is game meat allowed to be left in that part of the area. I am assuming that every jurisdiction has its own rules and timing for this type of thing. I can see that perhaps the area being desolate except for hunters that it would be perhaps longer than other less desolate areas. Thus this absolves any misconception that a fine is imminent in terms of the pack and caribou game meat that they were going to clean up.
 

Hexe

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I cannot assume that experienced hunters will throw any meat into any body of water anywhere. I can see a fine for the pack being left by Steve, though, but at the same time it was left there to guide Steve back to camp if he came back at all past that pack. It could also be that the fine would be for leaving the caribou meat unattended in the first place, however. I can see this being an issue with the authorities. But how long is game meat allowed to be left in that part of the area. I am assuming that every jurisdiction has its own rules and timing for this type of thing. I can see that perhaps the area being desolate except for hunters that it would be perhaps longer than other less desolate areas. Thus this absolves any misconception that a fine is imminent in terms of the pack and caribou game meat that they were going to clean up.

In Alaska you need to remove all the edible parts of the animal body immediately after shooting it, the links to these regulations were already posted in this thread. When the edibles are packed and gone from the place of the kill, you can take antlers. An important reason to remove the meat as fast as it is possible is to avoid teaching the predators hunters are a source of food. You do not want to have bears stalking the hunters for food.

Another important reason for these regulations is stopping the trophy hunting. Certain hunters are interested only in trophies, in case of caribou that would be the head with antlers. They cut off just the body part they are interested in and leave the rest of carcass to rot. It is wasteful and disrespectful so there are usually regulations to prevent it. This is one of them.
 

RickshawFan

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I cannot assume that experienced hunters will throw any meat into any body of water anywhere. I can see a fine for the pack being left by Steve, though, but at the same time it was left there to guide Steve back to camp if he came back at all past that pack. It could also be that the fine would be for leaving the caribou meat unattended in the first place, however. I can see this being an issue with the authorities. But how long is game meat allowed to be left in that part of the area. I am assuming that every jurisdiction has its own rules and timing for this type of thing. I can see that perhaps the area being desolate except for hunters that it would be perhaps longer than other less desolate areas. Thus this absolves any misconception that a fine is imminent in terms of the pack and caribou game meat that they were going to clean up.
AK's hunting regulations have already been posted. But here they are again. This should answer all your questions about violations, how meat is to be handled, and what is required from hunters. It also makes recommendations about equipment and clothing. There is even an accompanying workbook to help lower -48-ers get it right.
 

5W's

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AK's hunting regulations have already been posted. But here they are again. This should answer all your questions about violations, how meat is to be handled, and what is required from hunters. It also makes recommendations about equipment and clothing. There is even an accompanying workbook to help lower -48-ers get it right.
But the point is we don't know if mrat was thrown in water. I'm not sure why the refulations need to be posted agin for something we don't know happened or not. Steve leaving thr pack where he did I can see a fine for that. But then again like I said before would they issue a fine in Steve's case since he's missing. perhaps it was issued to his hunting partner because Steve left the pack where it was found? IDK I am just speculating, but the regulation doesn't need tobe reposted as we saw it before here on the last thread. Plus where in this Alaska regulations guide does it say this exact location the hours the game meat can be left at this location? If one can show us that would be good. The regulation if it shows that then point that out and post it otherwise it stands that the regulation may not have been broken for the game meat being left, was it issued for the water, or for the pack? Also his hunting partner joined the search for him so got distracted by that, I'm sure.
 
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5W's

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In Alaska you need to remove all the edible parts of the animal body immediately after shooting it, the links to these regulations were already posted in this thread. When the edibles are packed and gone from the place of the kill, you can take antlers. An important reason to remove the meat as fast as it is possible is to avoid teaching the predators hunters are a source of food. You do not want to have bears stalking the hunters for food.

Another important reason for these regulations is stopping the trophy hunting. Certain hunters are interested only in trophies, in case of caribou that would be the head with antlers. They cut off just the body part they are interested in and leave the rest of carcass to rot. It is wasteful and disrespectful so there are usually regulations to prevent it. This is one of them.
Okay that is reasonable I get that. But the thing is Steve may have left the antlers thare as a marker. As the assumption here is that he was getting lost so he took them from the game site. That's my assumption anyways. But then again if he was coherent enough to place the antlers in this manner then why should he be lost? Why did he go in another direction from the antlers? Maybe he didn't put them there.
 

Hexe

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Okay that is reasonable I get that. But the thing is Steve may have left the antlers thare as a marker. As the assumption here is that he was getting lost so he took them from the game site. That's my assumption anyways.

Left the antlers where? The meat backpack was marked with a walking stick, another one was on a hill, halfway between the camp and the backpack. Antlers, on the other hand, were photographed in the camp.
 

5W's

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Left the antlers where? The meat backpack was marked with a walking stick, another one was on a hill, halfway between the camp and the backpack. Antlers, on the other hand, were photographed in the camp.
In earlier posts there was a photo showing them but it was taken down. I'm sure people who saw it remember. I know I remember it. That's what I'm referring to.
 

WingsOverTX

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Steve Keel's family is still searching for answers after he vanished on a hunting trip in Alaska more than three months ago. I talked with his wife of 38 years today, Liz, on how she is holding up without him for the holidays. Plus -- the next steps in the search. Story at 4 & 6 on WSMV 4, Nashville

FROM THE STORY:
“Are you in denial that he may not come home,” WSMV 4′s Courtney Allen asked Liz.

“Absolutely,” Liz said. “You can call it denial or you can call it to hope.”

Liz said she hopes for closure this Christmas.

“No matter what though, he will be here with us,” Liz said. “He is always with us.”

Liz said they are working on arranging two more search groups to go in the spring.
 

neesaki

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New information released, stating that SK had no hunting permit to hunt there.


WSMV4 reached out to North Slope Search and Rescue for comment.

“There was a ground search, and over $200,000 spent in helicopter equipment and fuel,” North Slope Borough Public Information Officer David Fauske said. “This man never set foot in one of our communities. He didn’t have a permit to hunt in the area. He didn’t have Arctic gear on him or with him, and he wore camouflage clothing which made the helicopter searches extremely difficult.”
 

Unalienable Rights

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NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WSMV) - Steve Keel, a man from Dover, Tennessee, went missing after he went on a hunting trip to Alaska in August 2022.

Ever since he went missing, his wife Liz Keel and his friends have put in extra effort to try and look for him.

One way Liz tried to get people to search for him was by offering a $15,000 reward. However, as of Wednesday, Jan. 18, Liz made a Facebook comment saying she would be formally withdrawing the reward posted for Steve in September.

“We have four search groups going to search between Winter and Spring and feel the money would be much better used to help them and their groups,” Liz said in a Facebook post. “Please pray for these brave men for safety and success as they venture out in difficult conditions to search for Steve. Pray for their families who will be waiting for their speedy, safe return. I know God has a plan always.”

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