Found Deceased AL - Aniah Haley Blanchard, 19, Auburn, Lee County, 23 Oct 2019 *Arrest* #6

GuyfromCanada

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AUBURN, Ala. (WTVM) - The Auburn Police Division is asking the public for assistance locating a missing woman.

19-year-old Aniah Haley Blanchard reportedly last communicated with a friend on Wednesday, Oct. 23, just before midnight.

More at Auburn police searching for missing 19-year-old woman

Her fb Aniah Blanchard

AL - Aniah Blanchard media, maps, timelines *no discussion,23 Oct 2019

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Crimechick27

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I have been reading about the reasons why investigators sometimes use dental records to identify a deceased person. What I found indicated that teeth hold up over time better than much of our bodies do. Dental records are significant when the deceased has been burned (an explosion, arson, etc). Dental records are also common when some time has passed since the person passed away, especially if the person passed away outside and was exposed to the elements. Based on what I read, apparently a month is long enough to justify the use of dental records to identify AB. Perhaps there is a coroner or investigator among us who can offer more detailed info on this. I am neither-I just did a bit of research online this afternoon. ;)
 

jgarris

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Piggy backing off the last thread..

Seems like a lot of us are curious about the overwhelming amount of agencies and people out at this site for a found body. That plus the portable lights, recreational vehicles, etc. just make you wonder.
 

ce4au

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I have been reading about the reasons why investigators sometimes use dental records to identify a deceased person. What I found indicated that teeth hold up over time better than much of our bodies do. Dental records are significant when the deceased has been burned (an explosion, arson, etc). Dental records are also common when some time has passed since the person passed away, especially if the person passed away outside and was exposed to the elements. Based on what I read, apparently a month is long enough to justify the use of dental records to identify AB. Perhaps there is a coroner or investigator among us who can offer more detailed info on this. I am neither-I just did a bit of research online this afternoon. ;)
I was curious about this. Also interested to find out COD & MOD. Another thing...I’m anxious to see what all they actually do find in that spot on County Rd 2...I don’t know if I think that spot was random...JMO.
 

ce4au

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0101ABA

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I have been reading about the reasons why investigators sometimes use dental records to identify a deceased person. What I found indicated that teeth hold up over time better than much of our bodies do. Dental records are significant when the deceased has been burned (an explosion, arson, etc). Dental records are also common when some time has passed since the person passed away, especially if the person passed away outside and was exposed to the elements. Based on what I read, apparently a month is long enough to justify the use of dental records to identify AB. Perhaps there is a coroner or investigator among us who can offer more detailed info on this. I am neither-I just did a bit of research online this afternoon. ;)

I am definitely not a coroner or an investigator, just a lowly pharmacist but I can ask a doctor at the hospital I work at tomorrow and see if she/he has any insight into this. I’d be interested to know too.
 

Topppps

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Piggy backing off the last thread..

Seems like a lot of us are curious about the overwhelming amount of agencies and people out at this site for a found body. That plus the portable lights, recreational vehicles, etc. just make you wonder.
Found this interesting for a guesstimate what her body looks like Stages of decomposition
 

Topppps

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Technology that led to recoveries of Aniah Blanchard, Kamille ‘Cupcake’ McKinney could help solve Alabama’s prison crisis - Yellowhammer News
This is extremely interesting! Kinda leads one to believe that maybe AF didn’t actually come forward providing information like most assumed he did (ppl assumed that by the sequence of events - arrest, no bond, remains found, now he’s got a $50,000 bond). That police got their info from inmate phone calls.
How did they use these techniques to find out about Fisher when he wasnt in jail for anything prior to this case
 

ReillyElizabeth

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Technology that led to recoveries of Aniah Blanchard, Kamille ‘Cupcake’ McKinney could help solve Alabama’s prison crisis - Yellowhammer News
This is extremely interesting! Kinda leads one to believe that maybe AF didn’t actually come forward providing information like most assumed he did (ppl assumed that by the sequence of events - arrest, no bond, remains found, now he’s got a $50,000 bond). That police got their info from inmate phone calls.

My guess is that the phone call alerted authorities to AF's involvement and, once arrested, he then gave up the location of the body in return for agreement on bail and potentially lesser charges.
 

Van Helsing

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How did they use these techniques to find out about Fisher when he wasnt in jail for anything prior to this case
He was in jail the day before he was arrested by Auburn LE. He was back out again when Auburn police arrested him.
There are details in that article about the case that I haven't seen anywhere else. I hope it is okay for that news outlet to be reporting those details.
 

margarita25

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I have been reading about the reasons why investigators sometimes use dental records to identify a deceased person. What I found indicated that teeth hold up over time better than much of our bodies do. Dental records are significant when the deceased has been burned (an explosion, arson, etc). Dental records are also common when some time has passed since the person passed away, especially if the person passed away outside and was exposed to the elements. Based on what I read, apparently a month is long enough to justify the use of dental records to identify AB. Perhaps there is a coroner or investigator among us who can offer more detailed info on this. I am neither-I just did a bit of research online this afternoon. ;)

Slightly related, if I’m remembering this correctly and not confusing cases, I saw something on Forensic Files, an awful awful case where a man killed his girlfriend, dismembered her in the tub, separated her jaw from her skull, pulled out every one of her teeth with pliers, then threw her skull in the lake.

Years later iirc, two young boys fishing at the lake caught her skull on their fishing line.

The killer thought that by pulling out all of her teeth, this would further restrict identification via dental records, in addition to the dismemberment. What he didn’t know, is that DNA was preserved in the pulp of, iirc, a wisdom tooth that was underneath the gum. This led to her ID.



Additionally:

“In summary, pulp and cementum are clearly the most valuable sources of nuclear DNA in the tooth and both these tissues and dentine are good sources of mtDNA. Enamel is important in the preservation of dentine and pulp but is devoid of DNA.”

Teeth as a source of DNA for forensic identification of human remains: A Review - ScienceDirect

—-

“The tooth is the most valuable source to extract DNA since it is a sealed box preserving DNA from extreme environmental conditions, except its apical entrance. This has prompted the investigation of various human tissues as potential source of genetic evidentiary material. Recently teeth have been the subject of DNA studies as the dental hard tissue physically encloses the pulp and offers an anatomical configuration of great durability.[2] Moreover, when morphologically evaluated, even a single tooth provides valuable information regarding the individual to whom the tooth belongs.[35]”

Dental DNA fingerprinting in identification of human remains



There’s also the specific field of Forensic Odontology:

“Forensic Odontology a branch of Forensic sciences uses the skill of the dentist in personal identification during mass calamities, sexual assault and child abuse to name a few. This branch not stranger to many has been growing tenfold in its potential and its ability to bring the forlorn to justice where a dental remains is the only available evidence. It’s role and importance in the judiciary is fast growing and hence in depth knowledge in this field seems more than justified.”

Forensic Odontology: The New Dimension in Dental Analysis
 
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MajorHoople

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I have been reading about the reasons why investigators sometimes use dental records to identify a deceased person. What I found indicated that teeth hold up over time better than much of our bodies do. Dental records are significant when the deceased has been burned (an explosion, arson, etc). Dental records are also common when some time has passed since the person passed away, especially if the person passed away outside and was exposed to the elements. Based on what I read, apparently a month is long enough to justify the use of dental records to identify AB. Perhaps there is a coroner or investigator among us who can offer more detailed info on this. I am neither-I just did a bit of research online this afternoon. ;)

Dental records are also much faster than DNA tests.
 

gossheather77

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Technology that led to recoveries of Aniah Blanchard, Kamille ‘Cupcake’ McKinney could help solve Alabama’s prison crisis - Yellowhammer News
This is extremely interesting! Kinda leads one to believe that maybe AF didn’t actually come forward providing information like most assumed he did (ppl assumed that by the sequence of events - arrest, no bond, remains found, now he’s got a $50,000 bond). That police got their info from inmate phone calls.

I didn't know about this new technology and it is a great thing IMO and though very expensive IMO it can really help so much faster. Technology has come a long way
 

MassGuy

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Dental records are also much faster than DNA tests.
Yes. Fingerprint viability goes first, especially when a body has been given time to decompose. The next up is dental records, as those can be analyzed quickly. DNA will ultimately be used, but falls third in line in terms of speed.
 
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