Highway of Tears Media Thread *No Discussion*

Discussion in 'Western Canada's Highway of Tears' started by WhyaDuck?, Feb 17, 2011.

  1. Sillybilly

    Sillybilly Administrator Staff Member Administrator

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    http://www.theprovince.com/news/bc/...+makes+emotional+plea+tips/7304432/story.html
     


  2. Sillybilly

    Sillybilly Administrator Staff Member Administrator

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  3. deedee21

    deedee21 Well-Known Member

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    Highway of Tears is on 48 Hours Mystery on Saturday nite November 17 on CBS. Check your local listings.
     
  4. ~n/t~

    ~n/t~ New Member

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  5. shadowraiths

    shadowraiths LISK Liaison, Verified Forensic Psychology Special Staff Member Moderator

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    Judge reveals humanity in serial killer's trial


    [​IMG]

    Officially, the RCMP in British Columbia are probing 18 such murders or disappearances. But nationally, as the RCMP revealed last May, police across Canada recorded 1,181 incidents of aboriginal female murders and unresolved disappearances between 1980 and 2012.

    Prince George is where B.C. Supreme Court Justice Glen Parrett lives; it's also where he practised law with a famous firm and where he has long served as the resident judge.

    [...]

    He's a formidable character who runs a tight ship and has a delightfully low tolerance for BS. I thought he was smart and humane. His judgment offers evidence of both.

    He treated the murdered women, and their many relatives who were in court, with respect but not delicacy.

    About each he included humanizing details in "a process that can sometimes lose perspective through the use of labels which sometimes mask and obscure the people behind those labels."

    [...]

    He concluded that all four murders were committed during the course of a sexual assault or attempted sexual assault. Thus, he found Legebokoff was a sex offender and would be registered as such for life.

    [​IMG]

    link
     
  6. Patience

    Patience Former Member

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    http://www.cbc.ca/news/aboriginal/h...elds-strong-suspects-but-no-charges-1.2688994
    The Mountie overseeing the investigation into the murders and disappearances of women and girls along British Columbia's so-called Highway of Tears says his officers have a number of "strong suspects," but they have yet to uncover enough evidence to lay charges nearly two years after the last major break in the case.

    Staff-Sgt. Wayne Clary leads project E-PANA, which has spent years investigating the deaths and disappearances of 18 women and girls along three highways in the province's north.
    Roughly 60 officers were assigned to the case at the height of the investigation, though Clary said that number has dropped to between 12 and 15, who spend most of their time on the project. Still, he said E-PANA is very much an active investigation.
     
  7. Patience

    Patience Former Member

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    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news...rong-rcmps-lead-officer-says/article19350269/
    The RCMP launched Project E-PANA in fall 2005 to investigate the decades-long string of homicides and disappearances involving young women near northern B.C.’s Highway 16. The team is investigating 18 cases – 13 homicides and five disappearances – from 1969 to 2006.
    The number of investigators has been scaled back. It peaked at roughly 60 and is now between 12 and 15. The number of tips coming in has also slowed – a couple dozen were received over the past six months or so.
    The last major development was in September, 2012, when Mounties announced Bobby Jack Fowler was responsible for the 1974 death of Colleen MacMillen. Police said at the time that Mr. Fowler – who died in an Oregon prison in 2006 – was also believed to have killed Gale Weys and Pamela Darlington. Staff Sgt. Clary said the force has not been able to definitively link Mr. Fowler to the two additional killings, though he believes the convict was responsible.
     
  8. Patience

    Patience Former Member

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    http://www.cftktv.com/News/Story.aspx?ID=2170551
    Given what's going on here, and given the number of women that have gone missing, I think it's inexcusable that there aren't realistic travel options for people trying to travel along Highway 16," Black said.There's been lots of talk among local and provincial politicians about a shuttle bus network -- but no action yet.
     
  9. Patience

    Patience Former Member

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    http://www.vancouversun.com/news/Police+budget+officers+Highway+Tears+probe/10196415/story.html
    The budget for the RCMP investigation into 18 murdered and missing women and girls along the so-called Highway of Tears has been slashed by 84 per cent in the last two years.
    Senior Mounties and the Justice Ministry acknowledged in August that a reduction of $4.2 million in provincial funding to the RCMP would mean big cuts to the major crimes section, which includes the Highway of Tears probe.
    But Justice Ministry documents released Thursday, due to a Freedom of Information request, show the RCMP’s E-Pana task force has been financially decimated.
    The probe started in 2006 and at its peak had funding of more than $5 million for the three fiscal years between 2009/10 and 2011/12. But the task force lost two-thirds of its budget in 2012/13, free-falling to $1.8 million.
    Then in 2013/14, just $800,000 was allotted to E-Pana, which is trying to solve 18 murders or disappearances that span 37 years (1969 to 2006) and a wide geographic area encompassing Highways 16, 97 and 5.
    The task force at one time had 70 police officers plus support staff, and now has 12 “dedicated” investigators and staff members, RCMP spokesman Sgt. Rob Vermeulen said in an email Thursday.


    Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/news/Po...Tears+probe/10196415/story.html#ixzz3QJ4FK5aM
     
  10. Patience

    Patience Former Member

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    A 2009 Vancouver Sun investigation by reporters Lori Culbert and Neal Hall reveals the full story behind the Highway of Tears victims and raises questions about other similar unsolved cases in B.C. and Alberta. The cases date back to the murder of Gloria Levina Moody in 1969 and end with the murder of a 14-year-old Prince George high school student in 2006.

    Read the full Vanishing Point series:

    Part One


    Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/news/Re...ishing+Point/9900625/story.html#ixzz3QJ5BiBsK
     
  11. Patience

    Patience Former Member

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    http://www.cbc.ca/news/aboriginal/highway-of-tears-documentary-q-a-with-director-matthew-smiley-1.2841080
    Director says 'all need to be accountable' and take action on missing and murdered indigenous women
    It's a stretch of highway in Northern B.C. that's infamously dubbed the Highway of Tears. In the last four decades there have been 18 documented cases of women who have been murdered, or gone missing, along Highway 16. Ten of those women are indigenous.
    A documentary called Highway of Tears debuted at the Human Rights Watch Film Festival 2014 in the spring. TIFF called it a “hard-hitting documentary” that chronicles the murdered and missing, and shows “how the systemic racism that defined their lives also contributed to their deaths.”

    Matthew Smiley is an actor, writer, artist, and filmmaker and a driving force behind this documentary. CBC Aboriginal wanted to know what drove this Montreal-born, L.A.-based producer and director to take on this project.
     
  12. Patience

    Patience Former Member

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    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/b-c-highway-of-tears-study-polls-hitchhikers-habits-1.2653808
    At least 18 women and girls disappeared or were killed along or near Highway 16 since 1969
    Hitchhiking season is well underway in northern British Columbia, and that means Prof. Jacqueline Holler regularly drives by people hoping for a lift along Highway 16, not far from her home in the Prince George area.
    For some people living in the region, where a grim history of missing and murdered women has earned Highway 16 the nickname the Highway of Tears, thumbing rides is a fact of life.

    "Some are travelling, some are going tree planting, some are just coming into Prince George to do some shopping," says Holler, who teaches gender studies at the University of Northern British Columbia.

    [​IMG]These images are of 18 women and girls whose deaths and disappearances are part of the RCMP's investigation of the Highway of Tears in British Columbia. The women were either found or last seen near Highway 16 or near Highways 97 and 5. (Individual photos from highwayoftears.ca)

    "I don't see that changing, especially with diminishing transportation options in the north."
    Holler is currently working with the RCMP to study hitchhiking in northern B.C.
     
  13. Patience

    Patience Former Member

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    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/briti...ars-communities-want-fixes-from-b-c-1.2647209
    Recommendations not implemented after inquiries into missing, murdered women and girls
    Sally Gibson has been waiting nearly two decades for answers about what became of her niece, a 19-year-old forestry student from a small First Nation in northern British Columbia who vanished along the Highway of Tears.
    There's the official story: Lana Derrick was out with some friends and at some point ended up in a car with two unidentified men, with whom she was last seen at a gas station along Highway 16 near Terrace in the early morning of Oct. 7, 1995.

    [​IMG]Lana Derrick is shown in this undated RCMP handout. Derrick, a student at Northwest Community College in Terrace, was last seen in October 1995 at a gas station near Terrace. (RCMP handout/CP)

    But that's just one of the many theories, rumours and guesses Gibson and her relatives have heard over the years, a painful reminder that no one — not the family, not the police — has any idea about what happened.
     
  14. Patience

    Patience Former Member

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    OFFICIALLY it is called Highway 16. But to many, the notorious stretch of road where dozens of women have simply disappeared or turned up dead, has come to be known as the Highway of Tears. No one knows exactly how many have vanished along the 800km road through British Columbia in Canada, though some say the number could be as high as 40.
    http://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/re...issing-for-years/story-fnq2o7dd-1227186994208
     
  15. Patience

    Patience Former Member

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    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/briti...tudy-stalled-due-to-lack-of-funding-1.2899510
    A study on why women hitchhike along the so-called "Highway of Tears" between Prince George and Prince Rupert has stalled after researchers ran out of funding.The study began as an online survey in 2012, and University of Northern British Columbia professor Jacqueline Holler said the next phase — in-person interviews — is in jeopardy.
    "So many people have contacted us saying 'I want to participate, but I want to be interviewed in person.' It's also important because looking at the demographic information that people put in on-line, we believe that we're not talking to a truly representative group across the north," she told Daybreak North's Russell Bowers.
    The study has received a small grant from the National Collaborating Centre for Aboriginal Health, but Holler said there isn't enough funding to make the necessary interviews a reality.
    "I think we desperately need more information on all aspects of this problem," she said.
     
  16. Patience

    Patience Former Member

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    A recent appeal by the inter-American Commission on Human Rights for a Canadian inquiry into murdered and missing aboriginal women provided little fresh justification for such an undertaking.
    As has been observed in the past, the extent of violence against aboriginal women is already well known.
    Police forces and social agencies for years have been looking at this critical problem. The RCMP issued in late 2013 a National Operation Overview, reporting that from 1980-2012, 1,181 aboriginal women were murdered or are missing across Canada. Most of the 1,017 homicides were committed by men who knew their victims.
    Two years before the RCMP released this tally, the Native Women’s Association of Canada and the Feminist Alliance for International Action had requested an investigation by the inter-American Commission on Human Rights, an arm of the Organization of American States.
    The seven-member panel on Monday released its findings in Ottawa, joining a chorus of voices that have been urging Ottawa to set up a national inquiry.
    As most Canadians know from past experience, such probes cost millions of dollars and take years to conduct, delaying any relevant remedial action. The resulting reports almost always gather dust.
    For these legitimate reasons, Stephen Harper has repeatedly rejected this option.
    More on This Story



     
  17. Patience

    Patience Former Member

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    Coyne: Public inquiry on murdered aboriginal women isn't justified
    The murder of any human being is a crime, and a tragedy. It is the subject of society's strictest taboo and severest penalty, and yet every year hundreds of Canadians are murdered. Some of these, roughly 40 per year, are aboriginal women.
    What is it about their murders, alone among the rest, that justifies the demands, now heard on all sides, for a public inquiry? The idea is not objectionable in itself. The prime minister's abrupt dismissal of the suggestion - "we should not view this as a sociological phenomenon" - is almost cartoonishly simplistic. Every crime is the product both of the choice of a culpable individual and of the social circumstances that shaped him or her; where we see large numbers of individuals in similar circumstances committing the same crime, it is only common sense to investigate the possibility of a link between the two.
    Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/news/Co...n+justified/10149773/story.html#ixzz3QJIHvbOi
     
  18. mikkismom

    mikkismom Well-Known Member

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  19. mikkismom

    mikkismom Well-Known Member

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  20. Sillybilly

    Sillybilly Administrator Staff Member Administrator

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    Not strictly Highway of Tears, but wrt missing aboriginal women across Canada:

    from:
    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news...3727649/?cmpid=rss1&google_editors_picks=true

     

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