Human Remains (*cadaver) Detection (HRD) dog questions and answers **NO DISCUSSION**

Discussion in 'Lisa Irwin' started by nursebeeme, Oct 21, 2011.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. sarx

    sarx Verified Expert/Professional in SAR and K9SAR

    Messages:
    6,315
    Likes Received:
    138
    Trophy Points:
    63
    It makes perfect sense, and the answer is yes, each person has their own scent (which is how trailing dogs work), DNA has its own unique smell so to speak. This however is an EXTREMELY specialized line of work and there are very few dogs out there that have been trained for this. Only those with the biggest resources have this.... But, they do exist.
     


  2. cityslick

    cityslick New Member

    Messages:
    7,230
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    0
    It's a fact that it was an FBI cadaver dog? I thought we didn't know what type of training the dog had?
     
  3. iamnotagolem

    iamnotagolem Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,195
    Likes Received:
    553
    Trophy Points:
    113
    I dont want to ask this question but after reading another thread I feel compelled.

    If Lisa was placed in say a 5 gallon bucket that had paint thinner, paint, draino, gasoline, bleach etc and the container was then sealed and put in a vehicle would a dog hit on the car? Or would the liquid absorb the decomp smell? Or would specific liquids speed up decomp and make it more likely to be hit on?

    Sorry to have to ask this. It's so disturbing.
     
  4. Truthwillsetufree

    Truthwillsetufree New Member

    Messages:
    5,830
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Excellent explanation! Thank You!
     
  5. Oriah

    Oriah Verified Expert

    Messages:
    7,762
    Likes Received:
    26
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I think I understand what you're asking. Do you mean discriminate between the age of a scent?
     
  6. Oriah

    Oriah Verified Expert

    Messages:
    7,762
    Likes Received:
    26
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Certain types of liquids and other chemicals can adversely impact an HRD dogs ability to give a positive alert- but certain chemicals don't. In my opinion, it would be more likely that the containment method itself would adversely impact, because physical barriers typically present more of a problem to dogs who have been trained in HR.
    Other types of dogs may be called in if a particular chemical is suspected in a death investigation and an HR alert is unclear.
     
  7. Oriah

    Oriah Verified Expert

    Messages:
    7,762
    Likes Received:
    26
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Nope, you aren't the only ones. :(
    And that's what makes working dogs, human. Kwim?
     
  8. Melon

    Melon New Member

    Messages:
    165
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I registered just to be able to ask a question here and I can't seem to figure what exactly I want to ask or how to phrase it.

    If a body BL's size were put into a trash bag and made it to the landfill would it be an almost impossible task to use HRD dogs to find her? It seems that the cacophony of scent and the vastness of all of that would impede a search. Would that be the holy grail of success to find a body/remains in such a scent rich environment?
     
  9. Oriah

    Oriah Verified Expert

    Messages:
    7,762
    Likes Received:
    26
    Trophy Points:
    0
     
  10. nursebeeme

    nursebeeme Registered User

    Messages:
    53,157
    Likes Received:
    67
    Trophy Points:
    0
    PLEASE THANK THIS POST BEFORE POSTING

    The Lisa Irwin forum appears to be made up of cliques. You know, the type you have in high school before you begin to understand that there are a lot of interesting people and places in the world and your fear of such limits the personal boundaries you set for yourself. The disrespect between the two cliques is tiresome.


    That being said, we need another review of the rules (which is really just a curtesy as everyone should know them or how to find and read them by now): This is NOT hard. Post YOUR thoughts, theories and interpretations (easy enough right?). Read the thoughts of others (not hard). Respond to those that may be of a like mind (okay, that should work). If you disagree with another poster and cannot post nicely, MOVE PAST THEIR POST (how hard is that?) If another poster gets under your skin, PUT THEM ON IGNORE (only takes about a minute). If you must refute their post - then use a link and state the fact as YOU see it (you all know this case, it can't be that hard). THEN DROP IT! That's it. See, not hard. If a post offends you, ALERT it, DO NOT RESPOND TO IT, and MOVE ON. It is okay to disagree, but it is NOT OKAY to attack or make fun of others. AND THE SNARK...well, that needs to just STOP.



    It is our hope this gets the message across. There are many good posters here and no matter what opinion we may hold on who we feel is responsible we all are here for Lisa Irwin and want her to come home safely and soon.

    Thanks so much,

    The Lisa Irwin forum moderators
     
  11. Jacie Estes

    Jacie Estes Medical Marijuana Advocate

    Messages:
    6,241
    Likes Received:
    37
    Trophy Points:
    0
    IIRC Soon after Lisa went missing, there was a no-fly zone and ground access was restricted while search dogs were employing a new 'technique' that LE did not want to reveal, in an area near Lister. Has it ever been ascertained what this new technique was and if there were any tangible results from the search?

    TIA
     
  12. marlame

    marlame Member

    Messages:
    416
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    What is concerning to me is that the dog 'hit' happened a couple of weeks after Lisa was reported missing. LE did not remove the carpet so it appears it was an item on the carpet that contatined the scent for the 'hit'. That item could have made it's way to the parent's BR floor anytime in that 2 weeks so we can't even be sure that the BR holds any real significance to what happened to Lisa. JMHO... :waitasec:
     
  13. hambirg

    hambirg New Member

    Messages:
    3,380
    Likes Received:
    8
    Trophy Points:
    0
    It is true that a blanket or comforter could have been moved to the floor. BL could have been killed in her crib and the guilty party could have moved the blanket to the bedroom floor. Who would have had access to do that? And why would they?:waitasec:

    ETA- I also have a question for our experts. Are certain dog breeds usually used for different scents? I know when I think of drug sniffing dogs I usually think of German Shepherds. Are there any "typical" breeds used for HRD, tracking, etc?
     
  14. Oriah

    Oriah Verified Expert

    Messages:
    7,762
    Likes Received:
    26
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I'm fairly certain that if the no fly and limited ground access restrictions are accurate, then we're not going to know anything about that search at this time.
     
  15. Oriah

    Oriah Verified Expert

    Messages:
    7,762
    Likes Received:
    26
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Some breeds are most commonly found working specific disciplines. But there are many breeds (as well as mixes) that can be found in the various fields as well.
     
  16. hambirg

    hambirg New Member

    Messages:
    3,380
    Likes Received:
    8
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I figured as much. Lol

    So what would pit bulls, or some breed or mix breed that looked similar to pit bulls "typically" be used for?

    I'm not very covert, am I?

    And I am admittedly not much of a dog person.

    ETA- not that I don't respect them and the people that work with them. I'm just a cat person. Give me any cat and I can probably train them in a day. I was raised with them and understand them, dogs. . .not so much.
     
  17. Oriah

    Oriah Verified Expert

    Messages:
    7,762
    Likes Received:
    26
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Not sure of the question?
     
  18. KsStormy

    KsStormy New Member

    Messages:
    488
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I know I have asked this question or a variation of it before, but wasn't really sure if it was answered. If there is a body deposited in a river such as the Missouri, and the river is running as high & hard as it was in October after the massive flooding, would the HRD dogs NOT hitting on it be a surprising thing??
    I guess I just don't understand nor am I able to explain my thinking well enough, but if a body is placed in a strong moving current, how are the dogs able to detect it, if it is washed away within seconds? If a body is NOT snagged or caught up, & is constantly moving at a high rate of speed, is it still detectable by the dogs?
    Maybe this has never been documented to this exact example; the flooding of the Missouri last summer was said to be historic. I understand the dogs picking up odors from a decaying body in a lake or pond, but what about one that was fresh, & on the move in such a vast, quick-moving body of water? The old cartoon "Underdog" comes to mind... these dogs aren't super-dogs. :waitasec:
     
  19. Oriah

    Oriah Verified Expert

    Messages:
    7,762
    Likes Received:
    26
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Swiftly moving bodies of water are very difficult for dogs to work. I think we've touched on this before- the difference in using a water search dog on a lake, pond, etc vs a river or ocean that is moving swiftly.

    Taking an HRD water search dog out after water has calmed is sometimes more useful, because victims at times become caught up in places, and they can scent off of that.
    Hope that helps.
     
  20. hambirg

    hambirg New Member

    Messages:
    3,380
    Likes Received:
    8
    Trophy Points:
    0
    It's ok, I think I found the answer. Tracking.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page



  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice