Missing Persons - What Do I Do? Checklists and Information

Discussion in 'Missing Persons Information and Support' started by summer_breeze, Dec 5, 2010.

  1. summer_breeze

    summer_breeze New Member

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  3. summer_breeze

    summer_breeze New Member

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  4. summer_breeze

    summer_breeze New Member

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    By Deputy Coroner Investigator David Van Norman, Unidentified Persons Coordinator

    03/10/08

    http://porchlightforthemissinganduid.tripod.com/

    <snipped>

    CRITICAL FIRST STEP:

    The first step is the most critical: The missing loved one MUST be reported missing to a law enforcement agency, and that agency MUST enter the record into NCIC (the National Crime Information Center). This must happen IMMEDIATELY. Federal law prohibits the establishment of a waiting period to report someone missing. I don&#8217;t care if the person was last seen walking out the door ten minutes ago- they are gone now!



    There is a &#8220;logic convention&#8221; in law enforcement that the person should be reported missing to the agency with jurisdiction over the place of residence. The reasoning seems to be that a person is likely to return to familiar locations, such as home. However, serious consideration should be given to the location that the person was last seen &#8211; particularly if the story is that the person was seen being bundled into the back seat of a blacked-out Mafia car! In California Penal Code 14205 is specific: &#8220;All local police and sheriffs' departments shall accept any report of a missing person, including runaways, without delay and shall give priority to the handling of these reports over the handling of reports relating to crimes involving property&#8230; the reports shall be submitted within four hours after acceptance to NCIC via CLETS.&#8221; Technically that means that it doesn&#8217;t matter whether the person was never in California, and was last seen on the Space Shuttle! If the phone rings at a police station in California, and a person is missing, the report should be taken. It doesn&#8217;t matter if little Jenny has just run away for the 10th time &#8211; for all we know, this time she ran straight into the arms of Jack the Ripper! The family will encounter some typical law enforcement attitudes: &#8220;There is no law against being missing!&#8221; True, but there isn&#8217;t any law against taking the report &#8211; and in fact, at least in California, there is a law against NOT taking the report! &#8220;There is no evidence that anything bad has happened.&#8221; True, but absence of evidence is not evidence of absence! Since Jenny is missing we have no reason to believe she is safe, either. Unless the investigator believes that she is in the Penthouse Suite at the local Holiday Inn, eating bon-bons and sipping ice tea, then she is probably living on the streets with every ****-**** ******* in society trolling like sharks for little girls just like her! Take the report and get the information broadcasting in NCIC!



    Nothing happens without the NCIC record. The NCIC computer chugs away all night long looking for matches between unidentified and missing person records. If a possible match is found between two records, a teletype is sent to both agencies. We receive approximately 1,500 of these match-ups per year for San Bernardino&#8217;s 250 long term unidentified person cases. It is then up to the agencies to compare the identifier records, IF they were collected.



    If one or the other record is not in NCIC, there IS NO WAY TO MATCH THEM TOGETHER!
     
  5. summer_breeze

    summer_breeze New Member

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    ****Fellow Sleuthers****

    NAMUS/IdentifyUS is looking for platforms to educate families, law enforcement and medical examiners on the centralized databases established for missing persons and UID's. Please provide the following link for your contacts regardless of whether or not the case is cold:

    https://www.findthemissing.org/

    "This site provides an opportunity for families, law enforcement agencies and investigators to search nationwide for missing persons using a variety of powerful search features. Anyone may search the database, but by registering in the system both law enforcement professionals and the general public will also be able to:
    Add new missing persons cases
    Add physical and circumstantial details, photographs, dental contacts and other critical pieces of information to a case
    Create and print missing persons posters
    Track multiple cases as information is added to the system
    With your help, we can increase the number of missing persons cases solved each year providing closure for families and law enforcement officials nationwide."

    In order to maintain the integrity of the data entered, NAMUS wants to limit the people entering the information to those who have the most accurate resources-please encourage your contacts to make sure their cases are entered.
     
  6. summer_breeze

    summer_breeze New Member

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    For the Siblings of the Missing

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Sometimes in our compassionate desire to do whatever we can do to assist and help get the word out about missing children and adults.

    We forget about the siblings and that their entire world has been changed in the moment their loved one has gone missing.

    Here is a Website that has made for and by the siblings of Missing children.

    http://www.projectsafechildhood.gov/whataboutme.htm

    Bless you, we care.

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Adding:

    workbook: www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/ojjdp/217714.pdf
     
  7. summer_breeze

    summer_breeze New Member

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    http://www.1800runaway.org/

    HELP!My Child Has Run Away From Home!
    A resource booklet for parents

    Runaways and Drug Abuse: 15 Ways to Reach Out and Make a Difference

    How to Discipline a Runaway Child & Consequences

    Alone without a Home: A State-by-State Review of Laws Affecting Unaccompanied Youth

    The National Network for Youth
     
  8. summer_breeze

    summer_breeze New Member

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  9. OCMENYC

    OCMENYC New Member

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    New York City Missing Persons Day Logo.jpg

    Are you the family member or friend of a long-term missing person in the New York City area?

    You are invited to New York City Missing Persons Day on Saturday, November 8, 2014.

    The first-ever New York City Missing Persons Day connects all New Yorkers with the resources to help identify and find their long-term missing loved ones. Families and friends of long-term missing persons (missing for 60 or more days) will have direct access to interviews with professionals and the opportunity to provide information to aid in identification. Emotional and spiritual support services will also be available on site to all attendees.

    All are welcome. Families and friends who wish to have an interview are strongly advised to schedule in advance by calling (212) 323-1201. Callers will be advised on what information to bring. Providing information is voluntary. Information will be used for identification purposes only.

    When: Saturday, November 8, 2014
    9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

    Where: NYC Office of Chief Medical Examiner (OCME) – Hirsch Building
    421 East 26th Street (at 1st Avenue)
    New York, NY 10016

    Why: More than 13,000 people were reported missing in New York City last year, with some, including at least 200 children, missing long term. Nationwide, there are more than 87,000 active missing persons cases, while there are tens of thousands of unidentified persons for whom little to no information is entered into national databases. New York City has been conducting a comprehensive review of all the unidentified persons in its custody using new advances in technology, but new technology can only go so far. Identifications cannot be made unless adequate information about missing persons is available for comparison.

    Who: Hosted by OCME, in partnership with the NYPD Missing Persons Unit, NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, American Red Cross, and Disaster Chaplaincy Services, with support from the NYC Office of Emergency Management, NYC Human Resources Administration/Department of Social Services, National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, the Center for HOPE, and the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System (NamUs), and assistance from the Mayor’s Community Affairs Unit and the Mayor’s Office for International Affairs.

    For more information, visit nyc.gov/ocme
     
  10. BetteDavisEyes

    BetteDavisEyes All the boys think she's a spy...

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    How do police decide to issue an AMBER Alert?

    The guidelines for issuing AMBER Alerts


    Author: Ken Haddad, Social Media Producer, @KenHaddad, KHaddad@wdiv.com

    DETROIT -
    America's Missing: Broadcast Emergency Response, otherwise known as an AMBER Alert, has been an effective tool for police to find missing children since 1996.

    An AMBER Alert was issued in Michigan this past weekend, which got a lot of people thinking: how come we don't get more AMBER Alerts? There has to be more missing children, right? Yes, there are. But not every situation falls under AMBER Alert criteria. Below are some of the guidelines, or recommendations from the government for issuing AMBER Alerts...

    http://www.clickondetroit.com/news/how-do-police-decide-to-issue-an-amber-alert/32083706
     

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