MN - George Floyd, 46, unarmed, killed in police custody, Minneapolis, 25 May 2020 *arrests* #2

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cujenn81

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So I heard on a couple news videos last night that Chauvin is on suicide watch (looking for link)

I wonder if he really is, or if they’re just saying that so they can keep him isolated bc they know he’d get attacked in jail.

Or, would they just say they’re protecting him if that were the case? I doubt it, moo.

He won’t last in prison. No wonder he wants to kill himself (if he does). He’s probably trembling thinking about his future.
I believe it's standard operating procedure to isolate high profile inmates at risk of being attacked. I also think it's pretty common for high profile inmates to be put on suicide watch. I don't think the inmate needs to be truly suicidal. Anyone deemed high risk is likely placed in isolation for their safety. I think of people like Dylan Roof, James Holmes (Colorado Movie Theater Shooter), Nikolas Cruz. These are all high risk inmates who were placed in isolation and on suicide watch from the get go.
 

casesensitive

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Does the video start when police arrive at the scene?
I haven't seen the video, but I don't want to see only what those with an agenda want us to see.

If you won't watch all of the videos, how can you comment? And please explain how a video of what is actually happening can be construed into some sort of agenda that isn't worth watching. I'm clearly confused by your comment.
 

GoBuckeyes

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Yes, the officers knew he was likely intoxicated when they arrived at the scene. As soon as he told them he couldn't breathe they should have treated it as a medical emergency. They had him in the police car and at that point could have ensured he had the proper medical care.

They had a choice to make. They choose to pull him out of the car, throw him down on the ground and put pressure on his back and neck for almost eight minutes.

In the video that was posted the other day you can hear one of the officers say to the people pleading with them, "Don't do drugs, kids."

As I said earlier, they were more interested in proving a point than in saving a human life.

The specific toxicology is a new finding. The police suspected he was on something, but they could not have known that fentanyl was in his system. They may or may not have suspected meth. IMOO, someone can present with some telltale signs while under its influence, but not always. Was anything else in the toxicology report? Alcohol? TIA Better yet, do you have a link to the report?
 

MsBetsy

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In that video, the cop who has his knee on the neck lifted it off the guy once, and also was actually actively detaining the protester. Good for the officer for tapping the other cop's knee and moving it, and good for the cop for allowing his knee to be moved. I don't think in that case, the cop meant to kill the person at all, so unlike what happened in Mr. Floyd's case.
Yes, the entire incident looked like it lasted less than a minute. The officer placed his knee on his neck/back area for a few seconds and they had him on his feet as soon as he was handcuffed. Jmo
 

GoBuckeyes

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If you won't watch all of the videos, how can you comment? And please explain how a video of what is actually happening can be construed into some sort of agenda that isn't worth watching. I'm clearly confused by your comment.

Otto's comment makes perfect sense to me. What confuses you? That there are different videos out there? Or that humans can have an agenda?
 

GoBuckeyes

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@NTerryEllis
World renowned medical examiner Dr. Michael Baden, who performed independent autopsy, says "Mr. Floyd had no underlying medical problem that caused or contributed to his death... he was in good health."
Dr. Baden noted that George Floyd did not respond to CPR or cardiac shock in the ambulance.
Dr.Michael Baden: "When he (Floyd) said 'I can't breathe'... police think that if you can talk then you can breath. That is not true."

Thank you for this information. So, the only other potential factor is toxicology, correct?
 

drama_farmer

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Ex-cop charged in George Floyd death moved twice in same day


Ex-cop charged in George Floyd death moved twice in same day

CBSNews
7 hrs ago
...
Derek Chauvin, the fired Minneapolis police officer who is now charged with murder and manslaughter in the death of George Floyd, has been moved to a second detention facility in the same day. CBS station WCCO-TV reports Chauvin had previously been held at the Ramsey County Jail after being taken into custody in Minnesota.
During a press conference Sunday night, Commissioner of Corrections Paul Schnell said that Chauvin has been moved partially due to COVID-19 concerns, especially considering the number of protesters who had already been arrested on Sunday.

Corrections facilities have been under criticism for becoming COVID-19 hotspots, as dozens of inmates at Moose Lake, Willow River, and St. Cloud facilities tested positive for the disease at the beginning of May, WCCO reported.

On Sunday afternoon, he was transferred to the Hennepin County Jail. Just hours later, he was moved to a department of corrections facility in Oak Park Heights, WCCO reported.

This is the first time I can recall law enforcement officers and agencies publicly and vociferously condemning a fellow officer's actions so quickly after seeing evidence that an egregious "wrong" has been committed.

IMO, For so long, it's been SOP to keep the cop on the payroll, give him a paid leave or assignment to desk duty while the Union reps work their magic behind the scenes. Then, on the slim chance a "badged killer" is charged, the PR machine gets launched, the trial seems to take forever to get underway, and the case is prosecuted by a person who works closely with that same law enforcement agency on a daily basis. IMO

Chauvin must be absolutely flabbergasted at the turn of events. Indeed, that smirk on his face as he jams that knee into Floyd's carotid artery makes me think he was expecting that his murderous misuse of power would be dealt with in that same time-honored way.

If he gets remembered for anything, if there's any sort of "good" that can come from his homicidal actions, I hope he becomes some sort of symbol of law enforcement's willingness to step over that thin blue line and recognize a horrible miscarriage of "service" when they encounter it.
IMO
 

MsBetsy

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Thank you for the information, Tresir2012. So we have a police department saying that they never teach or sanction such actions, and their own policy manual that appears to allow it under certain conditions? So, how can they allow a tactic that they don't teach? What an absolute mess!!! Has body cam video been released yet?
In another article posted here a few days ago, it stated that the mayor banned the maneuver in April 2019. A member of local police spoke out publicly against the ban, arguing that it took away their control. Jmo
 

Cubby

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So I heard on a couple news videos last night that Chauvin is on suicide watch (looking for link)

I wonder if he really is, or if they’re just saying that so they can keep him isolated bc they know he’d get attacked in jail.

Or, would they just say they’re protecting him if that were the case? I doubt it, moo.

He won’t last in prison. No wonder he wants to kill himself (if he does). He’s probably trembling thinking about his future.

This article mentions his being on suicide watch and that he was transferred to a high security prison.

Derek Chauvin transported to maximum-security prison: reports
 

MsBetsy

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The specific toxicology is a new finding. The police suspected he was on something, but they could not have known that fentanyl was in his system. They may or may not have suspected meth. IMOO, someone can present with some telltale signs while under its influence, but not always. Was anything else in the toxicology report? Alcohol? TIA Better yet, do you have a link to the report?
The 911 caller indicated that he seemed drunk and was "not acting right." LE would not have known what type of drugs he was taking or if he was really intoxicated unless they looked for signs. They could have checked his pupils and his vital signs to assess his condition. So far I haven't read that they did that at all.

I don't have a link but I just read the report above. I don't think it mentioned alcohol.

Imo
 

Cubby

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Does the video start when police arrive at the scene?
I haven't seen the video, but I don't want to see only what those with an agenda want us to see.

Respectfully, the descriptions you are using do not reflect what is seen in the video. This case has struck me like no other. You should probably watch the video yourself before coming to your own conclusion.
 

mickey2942

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RAISINISBACK

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The specific toxicology is a new finding. The police suspected he was on something, but they could not have known that fentanyl was in his system. They may or may not have suspected meth. IMOO, someone can present with some telltale signs while under its influence, but not always. Was anything else in the toxicology report? Alcohol? TIA Better yet, do you have a link to the report?

You are absolutely correct. There is no way an officer on the scene can determine specifically what kind of drugs a person has taken or if that person has taken any drugs at all. GB I knew a guy who was arrested for DUI and taken to jail only to be discovered to have extremely high blood sugar from diabetes. His speech was slurred and he was having difficulty standing so they assumed he was intoxicated when he didn't have a single drop of alcohol in his blood.

There is no way those 4 officers could definitely know if Mr. Floyd had taken any drugs.

JMO
 

MsBetsy

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You are absolutely correct. There is no way an officer on the scene can determine specifically what kind of drugs a person has taken or if that person has taken any drugs at all. GB I knew a guy who was arrested for DUI and taken to jail only to be discovered to have extremely high blood sugar from diabetes. His speech was slurred and he was having difficulty standing so they assumed he was intoxicated when he didn't have a single drop of alcohol in his blood.

There is no way those 4 officers could definitely know if Mr. Floyd had taken any drugs.

JMO
Yes, one of the first things they should have done was check his vital signs instead of immediately assuming he was "on" something and making comments about not doing drugs while they were squeezing the life out of him.

It's almost as if they were saying, 'See what happens when you do drugs?'

Imo
 

RAISINISBACK

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ttps://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/lead-prosecutor-in-george-floyd-case-on-probe-s-next-steps/ar-BB14ThUD?ocid=spartan-dhp-feeds



You mentioned the president. I also want to ask you about comments he made. What is your reaction to his call for governors and law enforcement to "dominate" protesters?


I think this attitude and spirit of domination is exactly what has sparked the problem. The fact that Mr. George Floyd was not talked to — according to the complaint, they walked him to the car with a gun drawn even though he was suspected, never convicted, of a nonviolent offense, I think that is the heart of the problem.
 

kaen

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You are absolutely correct. There is no way an officer on the scene can determine specifically what kind of drugs a person has taken or if that person has taken any drugs at all. GB I knew a guy who was arrested for DUI and taken to jail only to be discovered to have extremely high blood sugar from diabetes. His speech was slurred and he was having difficulty standing so they assumed he was intoxicated when he didn't have a single drop of alcohol in his blood.

There is no way those 4 officers could definitely know if Mr. Floyd had taken any drugs.

JMO

Absolutely correct. Any number of physical events could have "altered" Mr. Floyd. If there was a thought that he had drugs in his system, EMS would have been the right call. (I had a friend who disappeared for days -totally out of character- and was found wandering in an area with no ID, in an incoherent/agitated state, police were called and he was transported by EMS, who found his sugar was sky high. He was not a diabetic until that episode. Now he has an insulin pump because his insulin is way to erratic. It happens.) Cops in the field are not doctors and can't determine why a person is altered.

Mr. Floyd may have told him that he had ingested Fentanyl or he could have worn a prescribed patch for medical reasons. We don't know. The report says what was in his system.

However, all of that is neither here nor there, Mr. Floyd was killed by a monster who jabbed his knee into his neck with his other monster co-workers restricting his diaphragm in a prolonged prone position with his hands handcuffed behind his back and when he went unconscious and could not be a flight risk not a single one of these monsters rendered aid to him.
 
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CrimeDawg123

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Absolutely correct. Any number of physical events could have "altered" Mr. Floyd. If there was a thought that he had drugs in his system, EMS would have been the right call. (I had a friend who disappeared for days (totally out of character) and was found wandering in an area with no ID, in an incoherent/agitated state, police were called and he was transported by EMS, who found his sugar was sky high. He was not a diabetic until that episode. Now he has an insulin pump because his insulin is way to erratic. It happens. Cops in the field are not doctors and can't determine why a person is altered.

Mr. Floyd may have told him that he had ingested Fentanyl or he could have worn a prescribed patch for medical reasons. We don't know. The report says what was in his system.

However, all of that is neither here nor there, Mr. Floyd was killed by a monster who jabbed his knee into his neck with his other monster co-workers restricting his diaphragm in a prolonged prone position with his hands handcuffed behind his back and when he went unconscious and could not be a flight risk not a single one of these monsters rendered aid to him.
Exactly. To be clear, nowhere in any police protocol is the proper response to a person with impairment to press a knee in the neck for 8 minutes and 46 seconds.
 

Kaley Smith

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Accidental? No. I saw the video. Case closed for me. My brother-in-law is a corrections officer, and he said they are told during training in no uncertain terms to NEVER put pressure on a prisoner's neck because it could kill him/her. Certainly police officers have a lot more training so know this too.
 
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