MN MN - Joshua Guimond, 20, Collegeville, 9 Nov 2002 - #2

ThePhantom

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I continue to believe there is someone on that campus who could shed some light on what happened to Joshua. But what would be their incentive be to do so? I no longer have faith that anyone there will come forward. I'm still of the mind that there may also be a person(s) who lives/lived in the surrounding community who may have information. This would be someone who may have known and possibly been involved in some way with the perpetrator. In any case, cannot rule out that this may have been a craftily planned crime, with hidden pieces to the puzzle that only the perp could know. And possibly the keeper of the secret vault of confessions.
 
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Sasquatch321

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I believe if the immedate monks nearby were responsible for Joshuas disappearance that his roommate, fellow classmates, friends would have a better idea of who that person could have been. But noone is shouting or pointing a finger at anyone. Obviously Joshua never told anyone he felt odd about a certain person close to his disappearance. This was not a planned crime beyond the extent of Josh running into a bad person imo. He randomly left a party alone.
 

ThePhantom

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True, but within the same timeframe there was an athlete on campus who filed a written complaint of sexual abuse by a monk, and persistently complained to the Abbot when nothing was done. I'm sure there are people in this group who are familar with the details. And that's just a complaint we know about. Certainly there were others and I dare say there were a number of other victims who just wanted to get out of there and forget about whatever abuse was inflicted upon them. Josh's crime did not happen in a vacuum; he was surrounded by monks who had extensive records of sexual abuse. Their "punishment" was to be sent away to be "rehabilitated" at either St. Luke's in Maryland or the Southdown Institute in Canada, and then returned to the abbey to continue with their "calling." Is it merely a coincidence that Josh disappeared in the midst of this den of iniquity?
 

Sasquatch321

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Why is Josh the only victim over the entire history of St. Johns sex abuse scandals that was taken after daylight hours and killed? It doesn't fit in very well does it. We're talking about monks that gently lay a hand on you to see how far they can take it. All of these other victims were attacked in daylight during normal hours after an extensive grooming process. Joshua never let anyone know he was worried sbout somebody.
 
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ThePhantom

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Well, there was at least one that appeared to be about as sociopathic as it gets. Like a snake in the grass. Who knows what set of sordid circumstances could have occurred to snuff out the life of a victim. I look at this case through a lense of what is known, primarily, that young men were surrounded by deceitful, deviant men who were largely allowed free reign of the campus. The mind can stretch just as far for this theory as it can for the notion of Josh walking/falling into a lake. The enormous, seemingly insurmountable problem we have here is what we have not been told and may never be able to know. I still hate thinking about everything the sheriff and FBI knew about the Wetterling case and didn't act on for almost thirty years. This is the same sheriff who oversaw the primary search for Josh. Now Josh and his family are suffering the same fate. We are now closing in on year 18 with no answers and no progress in sight. A miracle could happen and someone could come forward with information. Who knows, maybe they already did and the information they gave was minimized/disregarded. Does anyone here know if a FOIA was filed for Josh's case?
 

Corrupt2theCore

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Well, there was at least one that appeared to be about as sociopathic as it gets. Like a snake in the grass. Who knows what set of sordid circumstances could have occurred to snuff out the life of a victim. I look at this case through a lense of what is known, primarily, that young men were surrounded by deceitful, deviant men who were largely allowed free reign of the campus. The mind can stretch just as far for this theory as it can for the notion of Josh walking/falling into a lake. The enormous, seemingly insurmountable problem we have here is what we have not been told and may never be able to know. I still hate thinking about everything the sheriff and FBI knew about the Wetterling case and didn't act on for almost thirty years. This is the same sheriff who oversaw the primary search for Josh. Now Josh and his family are suffering the same fate. We are now closing in on year 18 with no answers and no progress in sight. A miracle could happen and someone could come forward with information. Who knows, maybe they already did and the information they gave was minimized/disregarded. Does anyone here know if a FOIA was filed for Josh's case?

Minnesota Statute 13.82
COMPREHENSIVE LAW ENFORCEMENT DATA


§ Subd. 7.Criminal investigative data.

Except for the data defined in subdivisions 2, 3, and 6, investigative data collected or created by a law enforcement agency in order to prepare a case against a person, whether known or unknown, for the commission of a crime or other offense for which the agency has primary investigative responsibility are confidential or protected nonpublic while the investigation is active. Inactive investigative data are public unless the release of the data would jeopardize another ongoing investigation or would reveal the identity of individuals protected under subdivision 17. Images and recordings, including photographs, video, and audio records, which are part of inactive investigative files and which are clearly offensive to common sensibilities are classified as private or nonpublic data, provided that the existence of the images and recordings shall be disclosed to any person requesting access to the inactive investigative file. An investigation becomes inactive upon the occurrence of any of the following events:

(a) a decision by the agency or appropriate prosecutorial authority not to pursue the case;

(b) expiration of the time to bring a charge or file a complaint under the applicable statute of limitations, or 30 years after the commission of the offense, whichever comes earliest; or

(c) exhaustion of or expiration of all rights of appeal by a person convicted on the basis of the investigative data.


You'll know... unfortunately it'll be another 12 years.
 

Sasquatch321

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Minnesota Statute 13.82
COMPREHENSIVE LAW ENFORCEMENT DATA


§ Subd. 7.Criminal investigative data.

Except for the data defined in subdivisions 2, 3, and 6, investigative data collected or created by a law enforcement agency in order to prepare a case against a person, whether known or unknown, for the commission of a crime or other offense for which the agency has primary investigative responsibility are confidential or protected nonpublic while the investigation is active. Inactive investigative data are public unless the release of the data would jeopardize another ongoing investigation or would reveal the identity of individuals protected under subdivision 17. Images and recordings, including photographs, video, and audio records, which are part of inactive investigative files and which are clearly offensive to common sensibilities are classified as private or nonpublic data, provided that the existence of the images and recordings shall be disclosed to any person requesting access to the inactive investigative file. An investigation becomes inactive upon the occurrence of any of the following events:

(a) a decision by the agency or appropriate prosecutorial authority not to pursue the case;

(b) expiration of the time to bring a charge or file a complaint under the applicable statute of limitations, or 30 years after the commission of the offense, whichever comes earliest; or

(c) exhaustion of or expiration of all rights of appeal by a person convicted on the basis of the investigative data.


You'll know... unfortunately it'll be another 12 years.

But how is this case interpreted? Is it filed as a criminal investigation or a missing persons case? Could there be a difference between the two?
 

ThePhantom

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I think it's technically considered by the sheriff to be a missing person's case. I'm not familiar with the intricacies of the law related to FOIA so I did a little looking. Here is how one missing person's case was handled: Police may be forced to release documents on missing person.

I believe Stearn's County doesn't consider Josh's case to be "cold case" - not even after 18 years of purportedly zero progress. I am not an expert by any means, but common sense is that many of these cases are hot/warm in the immediate days/weeks/months after they occur. While I hold onto a tiny shred of hope that someone in the community, or from within St. John's specifically, will come forward with information, I have a bad feeling that the ship for justice for Josh has sailed. Though it always breaks my heart to say that.
 

Kittej13

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I’ve been reading all the responses. And like many I love listening to true crime podcasts. I have listened to a few regarding this case. But I feel if more true crime podcasts covered this , and give it another look it could really help the case. One guy I would love to look at this case is Payne Lindsey ! He has a true crime podcast called up and Vanished along with a show on oxygen. I’ll submit this case to a few podcasts and hope they pick it up.
 

Sasquatch321

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It's now up to the public and media to solve this case, and it can be solved. LE has decided to let this missing persons case continue to fall through the cracks, as with so many others. I'm going to tell you right now what needs to be done to solve this case.

1. I encourage people to keep an eye out for a sign of Josh in the woods and on the shorelines of the lakes in the campus area.

2. I encourage people to talk to the monks directly and also find the people that were at the party that night. Also his roommate.

Not too bad, I believe there is a strong chance by simply doing these things, that we could possibly Find Joshua Guimond.
 

Vail

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I’ve been reading all the responses. And like many I love listening to true crime podcasts. I have listened to a few regarding this case. But I feel if more true crime podcasts covered this , and give it another look it could really help the case. One guy I would love to look at this case is Payne Lindsey ! He has a true crime podcast called up and Vanished along with a show on oxygen. I’ll submit this case to a few podcasts and hope they pick it up.

I second this! It would also be a good candidate for Cold Justice.

I am not an expert on this case by any means, having read through only a couple times, but I think it is solvable. Like you said @Sasquatch321 someone needs to just embrace it and dig deep. I don't live in MN anymore or I would probably get into some trouble with it. I think all it takes is for one student or green reporter to take a keen interest.
 

Sasquatch321

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The most important thingsin a disappearance is the actions and words of that person leading up to that disappearance. Therefore Josh's roommate and people who attended the party that night are the most important witnesses in this case. The public has had no knowledge or transcripts from this part of the investigation. It's time to open this case up for people that want it solved.
 

PezCandy

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I’m from Minnesota, this case has always bothered me, unfortunately In Minnesota for a very long time when a collage guy goes missing after a party or get together the police always used the go to “he drowned on his way home” Or “he got lost on way home and fell in the river” for many years rumors were that he was intoxicated and fell in the river on the way home. In the early 2000’s is when there were quite a few men who went missing after parties and only a few were actually found in the river. Either way I feel there is more to Joshua’s case, over 300 files on his computer were deleted after his disappearance, I wonder what those were?
 

Sasquatch321

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I’m from Minnesota, this case has always bothered me, unfortunately In Minnesota for a very long time when a collage guy goes missing after a party or get together the police always used the go to “he drowned on his way home” Or “he got lost on way home and fell in the river” for many years rumors were that he was intoxicated and fell in the river on the way home. In the early 2000’s is when there were quite a few men who went missing after parties and only a few were actually found in the river. Either way I feel there is more to Joshua’s case, over 300 files on his computer were deleted after his disappearance, I wonder what those were?

Unfortunately this case is no longer being worked on by LE or even privately, so good luck with an answer.
 

Giverny70

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I visit St. John's campus every year for recruiting events for my company. I was IMing with one of my new college recruits today who attended St. John's and we ended up bouncing ideas off one another of what could have happened to Josh. I have a particular interest in this case; I am originally from the PNW but he was the same age as me at the time he disappeared. I also went to a private, small secular college and I can't imagine (even as a woman) feeling unsafe walking back to my dorm. I have mildly researched this case but upon first review it seems that drowning is definitely not a reasonable explanation. According to my colleague who just graduated from that university, the common theory among students is that he was taken when he was crossing the Stumpf Lake footpath on the bridge. Looking at Google Earth, it would be nearly impossible to fall into the water with the height of the ledge. Also they dragged the lake extensively and had 118 National Guard troops searching the surrounding areas. Does anyone know when exactly he was last seen, other than at Metton Court? I find the abbey/sexual abuse angle to be highly unlikely, as whomever was responsible would have had to wait outside at night in the winter in Minnesota for the victim to come along. And being a Minnesotan now, I can tell you that you would have to be HIGHLY motivated to wait outside for than five minutes. Also, being the same age as Josh, I would doubt that in 2002 a 20 yr-old student at a small private religious college would garner much attention for his essay criticizing the church and the abbey, at least not enough to make himself a target. I believe that Josh was either taken from the bridge over Stumpf Lake on his way home by someone he knew (maybe under the pretense of getting a ride home, as he did not have his glasses or a jacket), a random stranger who saw an opportunity, or he was the victim of a hit and run and someone panicked. His friends say that he wasn't inebriated, but I'm not sure how accurate that is, as we all behave uniquely under the influence. If it was a stranger abduction, it seems highly risky for someone to attempt to take a 6 ft tall 20 yr-old adult male against his will, and for what purpose? He didn't have his wallet, and I'm unclear if he even had a phone (I didn't have a phone in 2002). The likelihood of getting this in front of a Payne Lindsay or a Billy Jensen or any other podcast is slim to none. Unfortunately a college-age white male who may or may not have been drinking and has had his fate ruled as drowning by law enforcement doesn't have the same appeal as a missing, white and pretty beauty queen or a small child playing in their front yard. News articles mention that there were nine people at the card game but police only interviewed eight. What happened to the ninth attendee? What major events were happening in St. Joe or Anoka that may have attracted strangers? What would bring someone down that route at that time of night if they WEREN'T a student? I am anxious (and fairly determined) to do as much as I can on this case (which may end up to be not a lot based on lack of evidence) but I would greatly welcome some healthy discourse in an effort to find some answers. I feel strangely attached to this case and I believe that "citizen detectives" can accomplish a lot now, especially with social media and being locked down during a pandemic. Again, I am just getting into this case, so any corrections or suggestions are most welcome.
 
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