UK boy, 13, hangs himself after taunts

Discussion in 'Bullies and Stalkers' started by SheWhoMustNotBeNamed, Nov 12, 2010.

  1. SheWhoMustNotBeNamed

    SheWhoMustNotBeNamed Former Member

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    Boy, 13, hanged himself after being taunted about painful skin condition by school bullies

    A schoolboy whose life was made a misery by bullies who taunted him for his skin condition was found hanged in his bedroom by his mother.

    Sam Riley, 13, had been targeted since he was at nursery as a result of his eczema, and had told a counsellor he had thought about killing himself.

    The school was warned he had threatened suicide over his treatment by bullies but tragically staff were unable to prevent him taking his life.

    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...n-condition-school-bullies.html#ixzz157UVO9me

     
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  3. concentric

    concentric New Member

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    Sorry, but the parents, at least one of the parents should have gone into the school and talked with the counselors, etc. about the incidents. The mother says that her son did not want her to go in and make it worse. OK, so what is worse now?

    Parents need to intervene, even if their children say they don't want them to, even if it means losing income, etc.

    I have, multiple times--and I will again.
     
  4. SheWhoMustNotBeNamed

    SheWhoMustNotBeNamed Former Member

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    The parents did make an appointment with the Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMS).

    Maybe they should have told someone at the school. But think like a 13 year old for a minute. If you're being bullied, and your parents show up, it's going to make it worse. The bullies will see that "your parents are fighting your battles" and will mock "telling mommy and daddy".

    I'm not saying that not telling was the way to go.It would have provided the school with something to go on and keep an eye out for. But contacting the mental health services for some counseling doesn't show complete ignorance or negligence either.

    I think they did what they thought was best for their son. And IMO, they shouldn't be attacked after losing their son to bullies.
     
  5. concentric

    concentric New Member

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  6. Charlie09

    Charlie09 Former Member

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  7. concentric

    concentric New Member

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    I do think the parents of victims of bullying must assertively advocate for their children in private meetings with school authorities. The school officials, however, have to take action to stop the source of the victimization, the bullies, by counseling them, setting consequences for their actions and speaking to the parents. If repeated intervention is not successful in stopping the victimization, then go to the next level of authority in the school system. Your child needs to know that you will stand up for them immediately and every step of the way. It may take a transfer to another school, as in my case, to find a team of administrators/counselors who are capable of handling the incidents appropriately and immediately. The bullies will know they are being watched.

    I do not think it wise or in their child's best interest for parents to confront bullies themselves, nor do I think parents of victims should confront the parents of bullies by themselves.

    (This is my opinion based on my own experience)
     
  8. concentric

    concentric New Member

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    Adding to my post above:

    I could be wrong, but I have a feeling that the young man may have felt ashamed that he was the one in counseling, as if he was the one causing the victimization.

    I've heard some counselors say to children: "maybe you are presenting yourself as a victim by the way you carry yourself" That's ridiculous to expect a child to understand that concept, and I think highly inappropriate and further damaging to a child's self esteem.

    He was bullied because of his skin condition.

    (thanks for letting me say my peace and that's my opinion)
     

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