UK UK - Jack the Ripper, London 1888, East End, in and around Whitechapel District UNSOLVED

Discussion in 'Serial Killers' started by PrayersForMaura, Nov 3, 2005.

  1. STANDREID

    STANDREID A slacker when slacker wasn't cool

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    November 5th is the 130th anniversary of the attack on Emily Horsnell on a London street. She returned to her room after being kicked and stomped by "some men" then died on November 10th. A few think she could have been an early victim of Jack the Ripper.
     
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  2. Sailor Haumea

    Sailor Haumea Active Member

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    There are three things that I tend to believe about this case:

    1. Nathan Kaminsky was Jack the Ripper.
    2. The Ripper letters were hoaxes and JtR didn't write them.
    3. Martha Tabram was a JtR victim.

    Of course, this is speculation. No proof.
     
  3. STANDREID

    STANDREID A slacker when slacker wasn't cool

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    Although the account is somewhat doubtful, December 26 is the 130th anniversary of the reputed murder of a woman called Fairy Fay by a man who could have been Jack the Ripper.
     
  4. paul1980

    paul1980 Member

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    Fairy Fay? Shows made-up/"wacky" names have always been with us.
     
  5. Bohemian

    Bohemian Well-Known Member

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    Jack the Ripper letter mystery solved? Expert sheds new light on notorious case
    Fox News
    James Rogers
    JANUARY 31, 2018 12:27pm

    ‘A FORENSIC linguist has shed new light on mysterious letters supposedly written by Jack the Ripper during the killing spree that sent shockwaves through Victorian London.

    Over 200 letters were received by police, media and officials relating to the spate of gruesome murders attributed to so-called Jack the Ripper, who was never caught. The notorious murderer is thought to have killed at least five young women in the Whitechapel area of London between August and November 1888.

    Dr Andrea Nini, a lecturer in English Language at the University of Manchester in the United Kingdom, undertook a “cluster analysis” of 209 letters linked to the case, analysing similarities in the documents’ text.’

    ‘Dr Nini’s paper on the letters is published in the journal Digital Scholarship in the Humanities

    Read more at:

    http://www.news.com.au/technology/s...e/news-story/98ce306f041959ec8c11911ab87a14eb
     
  6. hot cawfee

    hot cawfee New Member

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    Interesting ! Has anyone read the book by Patricia Cornwell on Jack the Ripper ? She did her own investigation and according to her an artist was Jack.
     
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  7. Bohemian

    Bohemian Well-Known Member

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    No, I haven’t, but will do. Thanks for the tip.
     
  8. UncoolNegated

    UncoolNegated Well-Known Member

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    I found a short story in a newspaper database that was tagged with Charles Lechmere. The protagonist of the 1894 short story was named "Charley Lechmere" and he seemed to hate prostitutes!
     
  9. STANDREID

    STANDREID A slacker when slacker wasn't cool

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    Sunday the 25th is the 130th anniversary of the attack on Annie Millwood by a man who could have been Jack the Ripper. She was stabbed several times in the legs and lower torso. At the end of March, Annie died of an ulcerated pulmonary artery. In a possibly dubious conclusion, a doctor found that her death was unrelated to the stabbing.
     
  10. Trident

    Trident Well-Known Member

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  11. STANDREID

    STANDREID A slacker when slacker wasn't cool

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    they kind of won out in the end.
    I haven't been there but I remember when it opened and there were protesters claiming they were glorifying violence against women. Many in the Ripperology world actually feel close to these women in a loving way so the protesters were wrong. The victims are immortal and their killer is unknown so, in the end, they kind of won out in a way.
     
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  12. Trident

    Trident Well-Known Member

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    From my perspective, the museum didn't glorify anything. It tried to show what life in Victorian England was like for the lower classes, and everyone living in that time. The police equipment was antiquated by today's standards, and probably wasn't much use back then. The place tried to show what life was really like, the only thing missing was the gaslight shadows. I thank God for that in an old, wooden building.

    I don't believe anything was glorified, it just gave information from the newspapers and period pieces which we could touch, sit on, and dress-up in. I took pics of my son dressed somewhat like "Jack". This place was not meant to be a house of horrors, but rather to give a feel for life back then. To me, it did the job as well as could be expected.

    One OT thing though, in West Virginia, Charlestown I believe, there is a John Brown exhibit. At the end there pops out a figure, which scares the 'ell out of you, of John Brown, and you hear a recorded speech. The "Ripper" museum is not like that, it just gives a taste, and interesting taste and leave you to draw your own conclusions.

    I think those interested in "Jack" should give it a whirl.
     
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  13. STANDREID

    STANDREID A slacker when slacker wasn't cool

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    Next Tuesday, April 3, will be 130th anniversary of the attack on Emma Smith in a London street. She died the next day, claiming that she was assaulted by a small gang of males. Some inconsistencies in her story have led some to question her account. Her murder is where many Ripper books begin. Was she killed by Jack the Ripper; did he start out as a gang member or what?
     
  14. GreenOrchard

    GreenOrchard Member

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    As a " ripperologist " myself , what are some of the theories you guys believe plausible ?
     
  15. StrangeOne

    StrangeOne Well-Known Member

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    The artwork she says was of Jack's last victim wasn't about Jack at all but about a poisoner of the time George Chapman. George waited for the wife to die as he slowly poisoned her. Don't take my word for it do some research it's interesting to say the least.

    Sent from my SM-S320VL using Tapatalk
     
  16. Memo30

    Memo30 Former Member

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    Other than none of the letters having come from the canonical Jack - interesting. (Also: Cornwell's Sickert book is horrible.)
     
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  17. Brubeck

    Brubeck take five

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    Jack the Ripper's victims were not prostitutes, says historian; sexist Victorian policemen unfairly labelled the working class women

    One of the women had run a coffee shop in Poplar with their husband while another lived in the residence of a friend of the Prince of Wales, Dr Hallie Rubenhold said.

    She said: 'We glorify the Ripper, we have a whole industry based around him, a fascination with him, an unsolved murder mystery going on for 130 years.

    'We have never questioned 19th-century orthodoxy - the world in which they were killed was a world in which women were disrespected and treated as second-class citizens.'

    Misogyny and sexism 'run very deep' in accounts of the Ripper and the women involved had been 'dehumanised' for 130 years, she said.

    On Twitter she said Mary Jane Kelly had been a sex worker and it was 'uncertain' if Elizabeth Stride had been soliciting on the night she was killed but the other three were not prostitutes.
     
  18. MelmothTheLost

    MelmothTheLost Well-Known Member

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    That's not true, though, is it?

    We know that on the night of her death Polly Nichols was thrown out of her lodging house because she didn't have 4d for her bed. She told a friend she met that she would soon have the money for her bed, and I find it difficult to imagine how she was planning to do that at around 3am without finding a punter (or why, if she managed to raise 4d, she would spend it on a bed at that time of the morning).

    Annie Chapman was found at autopsy to be seriously, possibly terminally, ill. She had had ongoing health problems for quite a while and with winter around the corner she was in deep trouble. Again, she left her lodging house around 2am because she didn't have the money for a bed. It's possible that she was not actively prostituting herself that night and that she went into the yard in Hanbury Street to find somewhere to sleep away from the street but overall she was a woman with a serious health and drink problems and very few options for earning any money. She may or may not have been the woman seen flirting with a man near the entrance to the property where her body was found, but if she was that woman she was clearly soliciting.

    Catherine Eddowes does not seem to have worked routinely as a prostitute but seems to have done so occasionally on a casual basis when in need of money. We know she pawned her partner's boots on the evening she was arrested and on her release lacked the money to redeem the pledge so she was in urgent need of cash. It's difficult to see how she was going to get that cash at that time of the night or why she headed away from home and into Mitre Court if it wasn't to pick up a punter.

    I believe that Nichols and Chapman had been Largely working as prostitutes for many years but would take other casual work if they could get it. Eddowes was in a serious relationship and mostly seems to have got by without prostitution but would do it from time to time if she had to.
     
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  19. MelmothTheLost

    MelmothTheLost Well-Known Member

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    I don't recall a coffee shop being mentioned previously in connection with any of the victims but who knows? The other one mentioned above would, I think, be Annie Chapman since her late husband had been a coachman to a household in Windsor.​
     
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  20. Brubeck

    Brubeck take five

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    Yes, definitely AC for the latter, but I, too, am not remembering the coffee shop in Poplar.

    I will enjoy Dr. Rubenhold's book, I think, as my own readings - perhaps all of ours - have been steeped in the orthodoxy of the times (1888-2018).
     
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