Woman Dies After Nurse Refuses to do CPR

Discussion in 'Up to the Minute' started by Blondie in Spokane, Mar 5, 2013.

  1. Blondie in Spokane

    Blondie in Spokane Well-Known Member

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    California woman dies after nurse refuses to perform CPR

    "A California retirement home is backing one of its nurses after she refused desperate pleas from a 911 operator to perform CPR on an elderly woman who later died, saying the nurse was following the facility's policy."

    "Is there anybody that's willing to help this lady and not let her die," dispatcher Tracey Halvorson says on a 911 tape released by the Bakersfield Fire Department aired by several media outlets on Sunday."

    "Not at this time," said the nurse, who didn't give her full name and said facility policy prevented her from giving the woman medical help."



    Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/us/2013/03/0...r-nurse-refuses-to-perform-cpr/#ixzz2Mfr8Zfpn

    hear the 911 call:

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/wor...urse-refuses-to-do-CPR-hear-the-911-call.html
     
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  3. Blondie in Spokane

    Blondie in Spokane Well-Known Member

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    Sorry that I posted the above thread in the wrong place....mods can you plz move this to "Up to the Minute"?
     
  4. Skagirl

    Skagirl New Member

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    I don't agree with the independent living facility's policy on refusing to give cpr. I can understand it for other medical treatment, but what would be the reason to include cpr within the policy? I won't be surprised if the woman's family brings on a lawsuit.
     
  5. mysteriew

    mysteriew A diamond in process

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    Why hire a nurse if they are prevented by policy to provide the care for which they are trained? Why not just hire a manager and forget having a licensed nurse?

    Just speculation but I would bet that in their advertisements I would almost bet that they advertise that they have medical staff. And it is probably hidden in the small print somewhere that they don't give all services.
     
  6. Gozgals

    Gozgals New Member

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    I don't care about the policy.. What the heck kind of policy is this to begin with?
    All they (lawyers) are going to say if there is a lawsuit, is she signed the waiver when she moved in stating she was aware that she would not receive CPR.

    Well, as one time working in the Health Care Field, I would break policy, esp. if I was a nurse. I would never deny care. (I was/am not a nurse) I just don't understand how one can let someone suffer and die.

    I have noticed the last year the Medical Profession is rapidly changing and people just don't care. All the policies are changing from years ago. People are being denied care in all areas.

    I just can't believe a story such as this one but this is the start of a new trend. Nobody wants any responsibility.
    How can we have a home such as this one with a "NO CPR Policy" when most of the residents are probably old and sick?

    Goz
     
  7. mysteriew

    mysteriew A diamond in process

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    I didn't find a website for them, but I did find this.......


    Check out the care options.
    Lots of negative comments there related to this.
     
  8. Wise Old Owl

    Wise Old Owl Retired WS Staff & Founding member of AFKBPOFPOPL

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    RESPECT + RESPONSIBILITY = REPUTATION



    Me thinks that due to this senior living corporation's IRRESPONSIBLE policy that all RESPECT will be lost in their customer market thus rendering a very negative REPUTATION in their field.

    'nuf said?


    Having taken both my grandparents through their senior years (including dealing with assisted living facilities) this story just makes me :puke:




    JMHO



    JMHO
     
  9. Skagirl

    Skagirl New Member

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    BBM
    I just wasn't sure if a policy like that could be legal in California. Even if it is legal, I would still think there could be some negligence involved. If the nurse isn't doing anything to help the resident, why wouldn't she try to find someone else to help while awaiting the arrival of medical personnel? Or does she have to stand "guard" so nobody but medical personnel attempts to administer CPR?
    I thought Good Samaritan laws were in place to stop people from looking the other way and try to help?
    So many questions...
     
  10. Herding Cats

    Herding Cats New Member

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    I remember when it was close to the end for my father. He was in rehabilitation, and for some reason the subject of CPR came up. It was made clear to me that while the facility would call the ambulance/911, they could only give him oxygen by mask and no compressions would be done. I was startled, and while I didn't move him from the facility back to the hospital because of his living will and clear statements in writing that he didn't want to be brought back if there was no hope for him (and by then it was clear he was never going to come back to his life, even if he came home at some point), I remember asking about that, and they said that it was policy.

    I was too distraught during this time, so didn't pursue it, but it was my experience that for some reason, RNs and LVNs are often prevented from performing CPR while the patient is in their facility.

    I don't know why, and I completely disagree with it...and I would absolutely NEVER work at a place where this policy was practiced. But it seems that it's not just this one place in the news.

    Gives me shudders.

    Best-
    Herding Cats
     
  11. Sonya610

    Sonya610 Former Member

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    Well a hospice wouldn't provide CPR either. I assume the patients signed a waiver or a DNR when they entered that facility.

    If the family had been TOLD about this policy or received a written material stating as much they shouldn't have a leg to stand on.
     
  12. oh_gal

    oh_gal New Member

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    If I were a nurse, it would be very difficult for me to work in an establishment where I would not be permitted to try, to the best of my training, to save a life. I would probably have nightmares if someone under my care died and I felt unable to help, due to policies, restrictions, etc.

    Luckily, I'm not a nurse.
     
  13. jjenny

    jjenny Well-Known Member

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  14. jjenny

    jjenny Well-Known Member

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    The person wasn't a nurse. I am not sure they have medical training at all. It's hard to do a CPR on the elderly considering their ribs easily brake.
    They don't advertise that they have medical staff. In fact it seems the opposite is true.
     
  15. Justiceforever

    Justiceforever New Member

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    Just unbelieable. Shame on that woman! Where is her decency? They would've had to fire me! I couldn't obey that policy.
     
  16. sleuthin4fun

    sleuthin4fun Member

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    I am not sure that we are talking about a DNR in this situation. I get the impression that this is a standard when you move into this particular facility, and that it applies to anyone who chooses to live there. It is an individuals right to choose to live in a facility where no sure measures are taken or, to sign a DNR requesting that no heroic measures be taken. I am not exactly sure what the issue is. I am an R.N. who has worked as a Geriatric Care Manager. Unless I am mistaken, the patients wishes were followed. The wishes of the dispatcher do not over rule that.
     
  17. jjenny

    jjenny Well-Known Member

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    I am not sure what the issue is either. This was not an assisted nursing facility. I believe the residents knew that they will not get CPR but instead 911 will be called. The woman was quite elderly and I don't think she had a good chance with CPR either.
     
  18. LinasK

    LinasK Verified insider- Mark Dribin case

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    I worked for 13 years in Skilled Nursing Facilities and I have never heard of a NO CPR as a facility policy unless the patient had a No Code on file. I've never even heard of it as a policy for Assisted/Independent Living either. Something is very fishy with this facility, and I hope the family gets down to the bottom of it.
     
  19. STANDREID

    STANDREID A slacker when slacker wasn't cool

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    If there was a DNR involved then why call 911? I recently, as a witness, signed a DNR form for a family member and it said that measures were not to be taken that only prolong the dying process.
     
  20. mac66

    mac66 New Member

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    Most people of 87 don't want CPR, at least in my experience. I have been a nurse for over 30 years. Where I work, we have about 60 residents and fewer than 5 wish to be
    resuscitated. They have signed legal papers stating this in their charts. We are bound to honor their final request. The elderly are often tired. They are ready to go and speak easily of passing, without fear, and with a yearning for it in many cases. I would not feel good about doing CPR on a very elderly person, but if it is her wish, I certainly would. However, to allow them to die in their own bed, with staff that know and care about them, and adequate medication for anxiety and/or pain, is a wonderful way to end life. Last week we cared for just such a lady. Her husband had been a musician, and she in burlesque. We played soft jazz in her room, gave her lots of care, though she was largely unaware of us, helped her sons, and it was a blessing for all involved.
     
  21. Herding Cats

    Herding Cats New Member

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    Stanreid, that was my question, too...if there was a DNR, why call 9/11? Dad had a DNR, so 9/11 was not called.

    I am happy to hear it wasn't an RN...that's some sort of relief, at least.

    Best-
    Herding Cats
     

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