Yale hosts workshop teaching sensitivity to bestiality

Discussion in 'Up to the Minute' started by TrackerSam, Mar 5, 2013.

  1. TrackerSam

    TrackerSam New Member

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    On Saturday afternoon, Yale hosted a “sensitivity training” in which students were asked to consider topics such as bestiality, incest, and accepting money for sex.

    Event director Giuliana Berry ’14 told Campus Reform in an interview on Monday that the workshop was brought to campus to teach students not to automatically judge people who may have engaged in these sorts of activities, but rather to respond with “understanding” and “compassion.”

    "People do engage in some of these activities that we believe only for example perverts engage in,” she said. “What the goal is is to increase compassion for people who may engage in activities that are not what you would personally consider normal.”

    http://www.campusreform.org/blog/?ID=4646
     
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  3. tlcya

    tlcya Well-Known Member

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    no thanks, no class needed for me or my kids. Ima keep judging those who commit incest and have sex with animals. I have no wish or desire to be "sensitive" to or tolerant of those folks.
     
  4. oh_gal

    oh_gal New Member

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    oh boy...here we go....
     
  5. Nova

    Nova Active Member

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    "Here we go" where? It wasn't a "how to" class. It merely promoted understanding of the origins of rare sexual fetishes.

    We go around and around here trying to understand sociopaths. That doesn't mean we condone murder.
     
  6. Kat

    Kat Kind words do not cost much

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    http://yaledailynews.com/blog/2013/03/04/sex-weekend-examines-sexual-culture/

    The article that the student reporter K. Timpf referred to within her own. (this article doesn't address beastiality that I can see and only references incestous fantasies which were responses from anonymous students).

    Just my opinion but Ms. Timpf opened her article in a style that is taught in college. Grab your readers attention with the first sentence. She chose to focus on incest and bestiality in order to grab the attention of her readers. I see that a lot in reporting. A lot.

    But I did read the Yale article and this doesn't sound like such a bad idea. The Yale article opens with this sentence: "Roughly 55 students gathered in Linsly-Chittenden Hall Saturday evening to learn about masochistic sexual practices such as those depicted in “50 Shades of Grey.”

    I can't make a comment about 50 shades because I haven't read it. But, if contains masochism and masochistic fantasies then by all means it should be discussed in open dialogue because it's already been introduced into the mainstream consciousness. I don't know if this book has it or not?

    Incest will never be acceptable to the mainstream because our culture agrees that it is taboo. The same goes for beastiality. IMHO.

    I think that it's great that they addressed prostitution though. We all know that there are usually emotional and psychological experiences that trigger males and females to prostitute themselves that happened to them when they were younger. That those experience have impacted them in such a negative way that they think this is the only way to 1. support themselves 2. support the self medication they use to dull their pain and etc. Does that make prostitution okay? No. But should those that prostitute themselves be looked down on with scorn? No. There but for the grace of God go I.

    My take on this is that the students were allowed to ask questions anonymously and no matter what the question it was addressed by Jill McDevitt.

    One of the student directors said: "...but I think what Sex Week does is it clarifies all these dialogues and brings it into a space where students can figure out what should be talked about and what issues we should be discussing,”

    I agree with her, how can we know what we think, where we stand if we don't think about it and talk about it? How can we come to an agreement in our own lives as to what is normal and what is deviant?

    link to article the OP article talks about:
    http://yaledailynews.com/blog/2013/03/04/sex-weekend-examines-sexual-culture/
     
  7. Nova

    Nova Active Member

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    ^^^^^Great post! Thanks not enough.
     
  8. IzzyBlanche

    IzzyBlanche Active Member

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    Now maybe people will leave that woman who wants to make out with the pig in the Geico commercial alone.

    :floorlaugh:
     
  9. txsvicki

    txsvicki Active Member

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    Some who attended the event hosted by a sex store owner did report having done a sex act on an animal. I'll never consider that an a part of normal sexual psychology, although suspect those few responses could have been b.s.
     
  10. Sonya610

    Sonya610 Former Member

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    When it comes to bestiality there is a VERY clear line drawn, men raping female dogs is the same as raping small children. The act causes a severe amount of damage (regardless of the size of the dog) and can quite literally tear them apart and kill them!

    I have a BIG problem with that! Did the author address THAT? And if not why not? Why not throw in baby rape while she was at it? Maybe society needs to be more accepting of that too???

    To even hint at condoning bestiality while not pointing out the HORRIFIC dark side is irresponsible to an EXTREME!
     
  11. Trident

    Trident Well-Known Member

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    BBM, Well, I think (hope) we all feel bestiality is deviant. If we don't, what do we have to look forward to as a nation - a wedding between a perv and his ewe?

    And make no mistake, some will be defending this deviant's right to marry whatever he pleases, and get a tax cut to boot, and maybe a farm subsidy along the way.

    My opinion only
     
  12. Trident

    Trident Well-Known Member

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    Sorry, I didn't read your post before I wrote mine. Just imagine the world will might be living in if sex with animals is A-OK and it's hateful and horrid for anyone to denounce it. LOL.
     
  13. Kat

    Kat Kind words do not cost much

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    Sonya in the article linked above the only mention of bestiality is to state that 3 percent of the people that had called in anonymously had admitted to acts of beastiality.

    This was a seminar that discussed what was normal and what was deviant.

    A student reporter whose article is linked in the OP is the one that decided to focus on beastiality and incest.

    The Yale article from which she created her article is here:

    http://yaledailynews.com/blog/2013/03/04/sex-weekend-examines-sexual-culture/
     
  14. oh_gal

    oh_gal New Member

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    ..."Here we go..." as in, the minute we consider treating these people with compassion (as the article suggests), we begin our downward descent into the slippery slope of ....oh, let's call it....tolerance of such behaviors. I'm not buying it.

    Sorry if that offends you.
     
  15. Reader

    Reader New Member

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    Just like I attended seminars on these subjects when working as a social worker and child abuse worker, the purpose is to gain an understanding of how to work with the victims and abusers.

    Yes, I think everybody here recognizes both beastiality and incest as crimes against animals and children and finds them repulsive. I did and do personally, but since it was part of my job I needed to know more about it and how to handle the cases.

    The people attending this seminar in their college will need the same understanding if they later work as social workers, psychologists, prosecutors, defense attorneys, judges, law enforcement.

    Learning about a subject such as this and attending a seminar does not mean that you endorse it or encourage it.

    As Kat has eloquently pointed out, the student author stuck some sensationalizing language on her article to get more readers and cause more outrage such as we see here. The original article does not have that language and very little about these subjects.

    No reason to get your panties all in a wad!
     
  16. Nova

    Nova Active Member

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    Not offended, also not buying it.

    NAMBLA has been around for more than half-a-century (and the organization's ideas are historically the norm, not the exception); yet I think you'd be hard-pressed to prove that we are more tolerant of child molestation.

    It was an afternoon seminar, not a new major.

    And while I agree with Sonya's condemnation of animal cruelty, "bestiality" covers more territory than human males penetrating female animals. And even so only 3% of those attending the seminar admitted to having engaged in any bestial behaviors.

    That's hardly a rally for the right to have sex with animals!
     
  17. noodled1

    noodled1 Active Member

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    Well when discussing bestiality you have to take into account sheep are notorious liars.





    just trying to add a bit of humor to a sensitive topic
     
  18. TrackerSam

    TrackerSam New Member

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    Who cares what the student author stuck in? What matters is what the program director said and what Yale's intentions were.

    Event director Giuliana Berry ’14 told Campus Reform in an interview on Monday that the workshop was brought to campus to teach students not to automatically judge people who may have engaged in these sorts of activities, but rather to respond with “understanding” and “compassion.”
     
  19. wfgodot

    wfgodot Former Member

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    Are they still offering the survey course with Dr. Baasworth and Professor Mooody? j/k
     
  20. Sonya610

    Sonya610 Former Member

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    To condone "bestiality" without qualifications is condoning the rape and subsequent killing of puppies/dogs and other small animals.

    Also the fact is if some freaks in NAMBLA want to rape 8 year old boys they are looking at possible LIFE SENTENCES if they get caught! If the rape resulted in the death of the child they could face execution. Raping pets is RARELY prosecuted or even discovered so to me there is a BIG difference!
     
  21. Nova

    Nova Active Member

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    Well, then, that's a different problem, isn't it? Let's increase penalties for animal cruelty. No argument from me on that score. Was it not clear that I agree with you about the rape of animals?

    I could be wrong, but I don't think the seminar was even about incest and bestiality. Those were just behaviors reported by participants in a survey.

    I suspect the survey was about behaviors between consenting adults, such as those portrayed in FIFTY SHADES OF GREY. Discussing S&M and B&D might be a matter of personal safety for students with those tastes.
     

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