George Floyd death / Derek Chauvin trial - Sidebar week 2

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mickey2942

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I am interested about the other three officers (former), in this situation. I doubt that they will be witnesses in the trial. Even though, they were right there. Part of the entire dynamic.

Everything they say could be used against them in their own trials. I don't see them as defense witnesses here for DC. I wonder who, if anyone, from Minneapolis PD will be a witness for the defense. Sounds like a great career killer.
 

thx4_medic_Babby

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I am interested about the other three officers (former), in this situation. I doubt that they will be witnesses in the trial. Even though, they were right there. Part of the entire dynamic.

Everything they say could be used against them in their own trials. I don't see them as defense witnesses here for DC. I wonder who, if anyone, from Minneapolis PD will be a witness for the defense. Sounds like a great career killer.

https://www.mncourts.gov/mncourtsgov/media/High-Profile-Cases/27-CR-20-12646/WitnessList02082021.pdf

I imagine most involved with this case are worried about mob justice and various acts of violence against them or their families as opposed to their career, IMO.
 

Breathe

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local newspaper says..."show the victim as a living person, not merely a faceless victim. Generally, one witness and one photograph of the usually smiling victim are allowed." I am very familiar with these kind of witnesses in the sentencing phase but not sure I have seen it in the case in chief.
Will Nelson ask him questions too? So curious....
 

SouthAussie

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Honestly he is the only one that can explain what was going thru his head...the impact of the "crowd" and his understanding of the hold and was it an approved move in his mind. I think hearing him describe it may well be the only thing that will keep it at manslaughter. We still have to hear the defense case and maybe some surprises. While at this point he seems extremely cold and hard to erase that look on his face in the video..we really don't have a clue what he might be like outside of police work.

I have read quite a few articles about Chauvin, his upbringing, his life ... trying to get a grip on the kind of person who could disregard George's life in this way.

From what I can see, Chauvin didn't have much of a life outside of police work. His wife spent time helping dogs, and did this with a girlfriend. Some of his neighbours weren't even aware Chauvin was a police officer, just knew he wasn't around much. He spent almost every weekend working at the club.

There are comments (and some details) about Chauvin and his wife doing various things to avoid paying full taxes for large purchases. There are comments that he is non-communicative, and that he doesn't have many friends.

Parents split when he was young, shared custody of Chauvin, then he lived with his grandma till he was 27.

Started as a prep cook, then his focus shifted to policing (did studies for both). When in the army was always designated driver because he didn't want to drink.


"and at least one family member who described being horrified by the video and said Chauvin’s behavior was out of character. “The number one question I had was, ‘Why didn’t you just get up?’ ” said the relative, who asked not to be named over safety concerns."

"The aggression was “routine” for the Third Precinct then, he said, but Braddock’s case stuck out “because Chauvin went from zero to 60.” "

Maya Santamaria .... described him as a “mellow” guy who didn’t talk much about himself. “I saw both sides of him .... Pepper spraying everybody, sometimes using holds that were not apparently the most legal of holds, getting freaked out if there were a lot of Black clientele in our club and needing backup right away for no apparent reason.”

Even to friends, former officer Derek Chauvin was an enigma - StarTribune.com
The quiet life of Derek Chauvin before the public death of George Floyd – Twin Cities
 

thx4_medic_Babby

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Mr. Chauvin is by no means a perfect man and does sound a bit peculiar.

However, I think we can all agree that pretending to be a government employee only to violently break-and-enter a pregnant females home and holding her at gunpoint is worse than being a bit weird, IMO.
 
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kittythehare

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Mr. Chauvin is by no means a perfect man and does sound a bit peculiar.

However, I think we can all agree that pretending to be a government employee only to violently break-and-enter a pregnant females home and holding her at gunpoint is worse than being a bit weird, IMO. Absolutely appalling.
Was that the victim or the accused?
 

tara83

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Mr. Chauvin is by no means a perfect man and does sound a bit peculiar.

However, I think we can all agree that pretending to be a government employee only to violently break-and-enter a pregnant females home and holding her at gunpoint is worse than being a bit weird, IMO.
Whatever he may have done he is a human being and didn't deserve to die the way he did.
 

kittythehare

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Thanks, I was reading the second article that @SouthAussie linked when I saw the post..

But he was also quick to get aggressive, she said, especially on events that El Nuevo Rodeo marketed to attract Black customers.

“I saw both sides of him,” Santamaria said. “Pepper spraying everybody, sometimes using holds that were not apparently the most legal of holds, getting freaked out if there were a lot of Black clientele in our club and needing backup right away for no apparent reason.
Even to friends, former officer Derek Chauvin was an enigma - StarTribune.com
 

SouthAussie

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Whatever he may have done he is a human being and didn't deserve to die the way he did.

George also didn't deserve to be dragged and tossed down by Chauvin, once Chauvin got off his neck (and George was likely deceased).
When I saw the video excerpt that sillybilly posted, it was horrific.


Hadn't noticed this before. If you want to see humanity in action :rolleyes: have a look approx 1:30 in the video in this article to see how DC 'helps' get an almost dead GF off the pavement. No pulse, still handcuffed .. this is the same man they called in a Code 3 on.
 

Gibbo214

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Mr. Chauvin is by no means a perfect man and does sound a bit peculiar.

However, I think we can all agree that pretending to be a government employee only to violently break-and-enter a pregnant females home and holding her at gunpoint is worse than being a bit weird, IMO. Absolutely appalling.
He was tried and sentenced for that. It was 14 years ago.
 

sds71

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Not to excuse what he did but:

As protests against racism and police brutality took place worldwide following the death of George Floyd, inaccurate information has surfaced online about his arrest record.

In 2009, Floyd pleaded guilty to aggravated robbery with a deadly weapon and served five years, however, he was not charged with kidnapping or assault, as the post claims.

According to Harris County court documents, H, a toddler and another woman were home when the incident took place.
H. was injured during the robbery by another man, not Floyd.
There is also no evidence that H. was pregnant at the time of the case.

Fact check: Viral photo doesn't show George Floyd assault victim
 

kittythehare

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Not to excuse what he did but:

As protests against racism and police brutality took place worldwide following the death of George Floyd, inaccurate information has surfaced online about his arrest record.

In 2009, Floyd pleaded guilty to aggravated robbery with a deadly weapon and served five years, however, he was not charged with kidnapping or assault, as the post claims.

According to Harris County court documents, H, a toddler and another woman were home when the incident took place.
H. was injured during the robbery by another man, not Floyd.
There is also no evidence that H. was pregnant at the time of the case.

Fact check: Viral photo doesn't show George Floyd assault victim
Thanks for the fact check.
 

GarAndTeed

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Great article @kittythehare- thanks! I don't think he'll take the stand, but if he does, does anyone have any ideas as to how he'll come across, and, more importantly, what he might say to justify his actions? IMO he'll hurt himself much more than helping, but I admit to not being at all impressed by him in any way. JMO.
 

kittythehare

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Chief Medaria Arradondo on Monday thoroughly rejected Chauvin's actions and use of force during the arrest of Floyd last May as contrary to department policy.
"Once there was no longer any resistance and clearly, when Mr. Floyd was no longer responsive and even motionless, to continue to apply that level of force to a person proned out, handcuffed behind their back -- that in no way shape or form is anything that is by policy," the police chief told the jury. "It is not part of our training, and it is certainly not part of our ethics or our values."

Derek Chauvin trial testimony by police brass is unprecedented - CNN

"It is unprecedented," Baltimore City State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby said. "You have police officers. You have training officers. You have the police chief who is willing to testify in direct opposition to Chauvin's extensive use of force. That does not happen every day."
 

SouthAussie

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Great article @kittythehare- thanks! I don't think he'll take the stand, but if he does, does anyone have any ideas as to how he'll come across, and, more importantly, what he might say to justify his actions? IMO he'll hurt himself much more than helping, but I admit to not being at all impressed by him in any way. JMO.

I can't imagine that he will take the stand. Because he is described as generally non-communicative, I don't think he would be capable of getting across to the jury any reason for his behaviour.
His actions would take a lot of explaining, not brief sentences or comments - which I think could be all Chauvin would manage.

Plus, if he does go from 0-60 quickly, as has been stated, the prosecution could likely make him go 0-60 on the stand. Which would not be a good look.
 

kittythehare

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Great article @kittythehare- thanks! I don't think he'll take the stand, but if he does, does anyone have any ideas as to how he'll come across, and, more importantly, what he might say to justify his actions? IMO he'll hurt himself much more than helping, but I admit to not being at all impressed by him in any way. JMO.
I'm actually searching for his humanity ...
Closest I can get is that he tolerated his wife's dog rescuing but what do I know about that, really?
He seemed to work a lot and she was self sufficient from what I ca gather.
Their divorce papers are sealed.

But it was his 'humanity ' or lack thereof on the day GF died that I must focus upon.
Otherwise I'm looking for excuses.

(I'm doing it to balance my own mind, I do not enjoy impotent feelings of rage and their physical toll upon my body and I'm doing it to stay level.)
 
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