MN - George Floyd, 46, Minneapolis, 25 May 2020 **Media & Timeline - NO DISCUSSION

Discussion in 'Trials: Media & Documents *NO DISCUSSION*' started by dixiegirl1035, Mar 26, 2021.

  1. dixiegirl1035

    dixiegirl1035 I will do it, but I won't like it

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    Full jury seated in trial of former officer charged in George Floyd's death

    The final juror was selected on the 11th day of jury selection in a process that saw 95 jurors dismissed.

    The 15 jurors are: three white men, two in their 20s and one in his 30s; six white women, four in their 50s, one in her 40s and one in her 20s; two mixed-race woman, one in her 20s and the other in her 40s; three Black men, two in their 30s and one in his 40s; and one Black woman in her 60s.

    Opening statements in Derek Chauvin's trial are scheduled to begin at 9 a.m. Monday.... Chauvin, who was recorded on bystander video kneeling on Floyd's neck for about nine minutes, is charged with second-degree murder, third-degree murder and manslaughter. The video brought national and international attention to Floyd's death and prompted global protests for racial justice and against police brutality.

    Three other former officers involved in Floyd’s arrest are scheduled to stand trial in August. They are charged with aiding and abetting second-degree murder and manslaughter...Hennepin County Judge Peter Cahill declined Friday to move or delay Chauvin's trial over defense concerns that news of a $27 million settlement that the city had reached with Floyd's family this month would affect jurors’ ability to be impartial.
     
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  2. Tippy Lynn

    Tippy Lynn Well-Known Member

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    No. 2: White man, 20s
    He described himself as a chemist and environmental studies scientist who said he typically views life through an analytical lens.

    Defense attorney Eric Nelson asked him to expand on some of the answers he gave on his written questionnaire, particularly a question concerning Black Lives Matter.

    “I support the message that every life should matter equally,” the juror said. “I don’t believe that the organization Black Lives Matter necessarily stands for that.”

    The juror was also asked to expand on answers he gave about disparities in policing and about the criminal justice system. He said he doesn’t necessarily think Minneapolis police are more likely to use force against Black people than they would against others.

    However, he said he believes the criminal justice system is biased against racial and ethnic minorities. He said there was a lot of evidence to support that opinion.

    No. 9: Multi/mixed race woman, 20s
    She describes herself as easygoing, and a mediator among her friends.

    In her questionnaire, she said she had somewhat negative impressions of Chauvin, but that she could keep an open mind and be fair. She also said she believes the Black Lives Matter movement, along with Blue Lives Matter, has turned into a disingenuous marketing scheme for corporations.

    She has an uncle who’s a police officer in central Minnesota, but said that wouldn't affect her opinion.

    When the judge told her she was chosen, she said, "Awesome."

    No. 19: White man, 30s
    He said he’s in client services and has had to resolve conflicts before.

    In his questionnaire, he indicated his view of Chauvin was “somewhat negative” because he didn’t resuscitate Floyd, and that he supports Black Lives Matter in a general context. He also said he has some unfavorable views of Blue Lives Matter.

    He said he has a “friend of a friend” who is a Minneapolis K-9 officer but that he hasn’t spoken to him about the case or seen him since the pandemic.

    He said he’s seen the bystander video about two or three times, not in full, as part of news articles.

    No. 27: Black man, 30s
    He told the court he came to the United States 14 years ago, speaks multiple languages, works in information technology and is married.

    Nelson asked the juror about an answer he provided on the written questionnaire about the death of Floyd. “And you said, ‘It could have been me or anyone else.' Can you explain that a little?” asked Nelson.

    “It could have been anybody. It could have been you,” replied the juror. “I also used to live not far from that area (38th Street and Chicago Avenue in south Minneapolis) when I first met my wife. So that is why I said it could have been me. It could have been anybody.”

    Asked if he had any particular opinions about the Minneapolis Police Department or law enforcement in general, the man said he did not. The juror also said he felt somewhat supportive of both Black Lives Matter and Blue Lives Matter.

    “And you wrote that you believe ‘our cops need to be safe and feel and be safe to protect our community,’” Nelson read from the juror’s questionnaire. “Correct,” said the juror.

    No. 44: White woman, 50s
    The court held part of her questioning without audio while they discussed a sensitive matter with the juror. She later said in her work for a nonprofit advocacy group, she’s had contact with Attorney General Keith Ellison.

    When asked if she felt that would jeopardize her ability to be an impartial juror, she said no.

    Nelson asked the juror about her answers on the jury questionnaire pertaining to the treatment of people of color by the criminal justice system.

    “I do believe there’s bias,” said the woman. “I’ve seen it in my work.”

    The woman also said had formed a somewhat negative opinion of Chauvin. But she said she had sympathy and empathy, not only for Floyd, but for the officers involved.

    “Everyone’s lives are changed by this incident and what happened. Everyone’s lives,” she said. “And it’s not easy. For anyone.”

    No. 52: Black man, 30s
    He said he works in the banking industry and is a youth sports coach.

    In his questionnaire, he said he was neutral on Chauvin and Floyd. He said he had seen the video and has wondered why the other officers didn’t intervene.

    Prosecutor Steve Schleicher questioned one of the juror's statements made during questioning by the defense. The man had said he didn’t think anyone had the intent to cause Floyd’s death.

    Schleicher said Chauvin’s intentions will be contested during the trial and asked him if he’d have a problem setting aside his opinion.

    “I don’t think it would be that difficult at all,” he said. “I think I can definitely look at it with an objective point of view.”

    No. 55: White woman, 50s
    She said she works in health care as an executive assistant.

    The juror said she couldn’t watch the full video because she found it too disturbing.

    She also said in her questionnaire she has a somewhat negative opinion of Chauvin but that he’s innocent until proven otherwise.

    She said she has a somewhat unfavorable opinion of Black Lives Matter, acknowledging that she perceives it to possibly mean that other lives don’t matter. She wrote on her questionnaire, “I believe all lives matter,” according to notes from the pool reporter.

    No. 79: Black man, 40s
    He said he works in management capacity, and that he has not formed an opinion about who is responsible for Floyd’s death.

    In his questionnaire, he said he had a neutral opinion of Chauvin and a “somewhat positive” impression of Floyd.

    He said he strongly disagreed with defunding police, noting that his house was burglarized once and he had to call the police. The man said he immigrated to the United States.

    No. 85: Multi/mixed race woman, 40s
    She said she works in organizational management.

    In responses to the court, she said was always taught to respect police but added that she wouldn't have trouble second-guessing their decisions if needed.

    “Police officers are human,” she said. “They’re not robots that are programmed to all behave in the exact same way. So I feel like as humans, they can make mistakes as well.”

    No. 89: White woman, 50s
    She said she’s a cardiac care nurse who lives in the suburbs.

    She was questioned in depth about her medical training and whether she would second-guess police on resuscitation efforts. She was also asked whether she would reference her nursing experience during deliberations. She said she could avoid it, and would not act as an expert during deliberations.

    “I think I can be impartial and listen to instructions and go with what I’m given and ignore the outside stuff,” she said.

    No. 91: Black woman, 60s
    She said she’s retired from a job in marketing, and that she has a degree in psychology. She volunteers with underserved youth. She grew up in south Minneapolis near where Floyd died.

    She said she watched a few minutes of the bystander video of Floyd’s arrest before shutting it off.

    She has a relative who is a Minneapolis police officer but they are not close.

    She said she believes Blacks and whites do not receive equal treatment, noting that a white U.S. Capitol riot suspect was allowed to go on vacation in Mexico after she was charged.

    She said she doesn’t follow the news closely and does not know enough yet to judge the case one way or another.

    No. 92: White woman, 40s
    She said she works in communications, and has been with the same company for 15 years.

    She disagrees with defunding the police but believes change is needed based on what she's seen in media coverage of racism.

    She noted somewhat negative views of both Chauvin and Floyd, that she didn’t believe Floyd deserved to die, and that police used excessive force. But she also noted she didn’t think Floyd was innocent either, according to notes from a pool reporter.

    She said she understands there are reasons people struggle with addiction.

    No. 96: White woman, 50s
    She described herself as an animal lover who is passionate about advocacy for affordable housing and homelessness. She told the court said she recently resigned from her customer service-related job. The juror noted she feels like she is good at de-escalating conflicts and getting both sides to come together for a resolution.

    She said she had seen video clips of the bystander video a few times and is also aware of the $27 million settlement.

    In her questionnaire, she wrote that the restraint used on Floyd was “ultimately responsible” for his death, but under questioning she acknowledged that was her assumption based on what she had seen. She acknowledged the video may not show the entirety of what happened.

    No. 118: White woman, 20s
    The juror is a social worker who has relatives who are nurses.

    In her line of work, she's had to call the police to remove unruly people. When asked by the prosecution if she's ever seen someone not comply with the police, she said she has not. Schleicher, the prosecutor, wondered if she would blame a person who doesn't comply with police for injuries resulting from a police encounter. She said everyone needs to be treated with respect even if they are suspected of a crime.

    She disagrees with defunding police, but under questioning about police reform said that “there are good things and things that should be changed.”

    The juror said she’s discussed the case with family members, including one who said they thought Chauvin should not have kept his knee on Floyd's neck for that long.

    She said her decision regarding a verdict would not affect her relationship with family and she wouldn't feel the need to justify it. She said she's curious to hear more about police training that may have influenced how the encounter unfolded.

    No. 131: White man, 20s
    He described himself as an accountant and a sports fan. When asked by Schleicher about his opinion on athletes who “take a knee” during the national anthem, the man said, “I would prefer if someone would express their beliefs in a different manner. But I understand what they are trying to do and raise the dialogue on certain issues.”

    The man said that after watching the bystander video from May 25, 2020, he felt like Chauvin’s use of force lasted too long.

    He said he generally believes racial minorities are treated unfairly by the criminal justice system.

    He strongly disagrees with the notion of defunding the Minneapolis Police Department. “I believe the force is a necessary and integral part of our society,” he said.

    The man will be dismissed if none of the other jurors drop out by Monday, when opening statements begin.
     
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  3. dixiegirl1035

    dixiegirl1035 I will do it, but I won't like it

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    Posted in MT by @SouthAussie at MN - George Floyd, 46, killed in police custody, Minneapolis, 25 May 2020 *officers charged* #3 and bringing here for trial MSM

    "Many witnesses are expected to testify, including Minneapolis police chief Medaria Arradondo, county medical examiner, Dr. Andrew Baker, and Darnella Frazier, the teenager who filmed Chauvin kneeling on Floyd’s neck. There will also likely be a number of expert witnesses testifying for both the prosecution and the defense.

    Earlier this month, the prosecution announced plans to include some of Floyd’s friends and family members as “spark of life” witnesses. The state of Minnesota allows for this kind of testimony to humanize a crime victim for a jury.

    When a police officer’s actions have left the other individual (or individuals) dead, there is often little evidence to challenge the officer’s perspective. Floyd’s case is noteworthy, among other reasons, for the footage shot by Frazier—and for material captured by other officers’ body cameras .....

    Derek Chauvin Trial Set to Begin Over the Death of George Floyd "
     
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  4. dixiegirl1035

    dixiegirl1035 I will do it, but I won't like it

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    Posted by @Chelly in MT .

    Opening statements Monday morning will be given by Jerry Blackwell for the State and Eric Nelson for the defense tomorrow morning.

    "Matthew Frank
    Minnesota Assistant Attorney General Matthew Frank is the lead prosecutor of Chauvin’s case.

    Frank has been the manager of the criminal division of the Minnesota attorney general’s office for the past 14 years and has worked in the attorney general’s office for a total of 21 years. Before he joined the office, he worked as a public defender in Anoka and Sherburne counties, and as an assistant Wright County attorney.

    Most court documents filed by prosecutors for this case are signed by Frank.
    Link below lists and describes "who is who"."

    A who's who guide to main players in Derek Chauvin trial | West Central Tribune
     
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  5. dixiegirl1035

    dixiegirl1035 I will do it, but I won't like it

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    Posted by @Weki on MT

    "Not sure if this has already been posted but judge ruled Wednesday that 2 out of 8 prior incidents with Chauvin would be coming in as ‘he knew better’ for #3 and modus operandi evidence for #5:

    Incident No. 3 — Aug. 22, 2015:On August 22, 2015, Defendant Chauvin participated with other officers in rendering aid to a suicidal, intoxicated, and mentally-disturbed male. Chauvin observed other officers physically struggle with the male and one officer used a Taser on the male, to little avail. Eventually, the officers were able to put the male on the ground and place handcuffs on him. Chauvin and the other officers then immediately put the male in the side-recovery position, consistent with training. Chauvin rode with the male to the hospital for medical care. Officers involved in the response received a recommendation for an award for their appropriate efforts and received feedback from medical professionals that, if officers had prolonged their detention of the male or failed to transport the male to the hospital in a timely manner, the male could have died.

    Incident No. 5 — June 25, 2017:On June 25, 2017, Defendant Chauvin went to place a female under arrest in her home. As the female walked by, Chauvin grabbed one of her arms and told her she was under arrest. The female tried to pull away, and Chauvin applied a handcuff to one wrist. As the female tried to twist away, Chauvin pulled her down to the ground in the prone position and kneeled on her body to pin her to the ground. After being handcuffed, the female refused to stand, so Chauvin carried her out of the house in a prone position and set her face down on the sidewalk. Even though the female was not physically resisting in any way, Chauvin kneeled on her body, using his body weight to pin her to the ground while another officer moved the squad car closer. Chauvin then directed the other officer to apply a Hobble restraint to the female even though she was not providing any physical resistance. Chauvin’s conduct in kneeling on the female during this entire time was more force than was reasonably necessary under the circumstances.

    https://lawandcrime.com/live-trials...hog-tie-a-suspect-who-wasnt-resisting-arrest/
     
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  6. dixiegirl1035

    dixiegirl1035 I will do it, but I won't like it

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    I'm going to do some back to backs of the videos so all in one place on the thread

    WARNING - VERY UPSETTING AND GRAPHIC - ROLL AND SCROLL IF YOU DON'T WANT TO VIEW

    9:30 Video of "timeline" compilation and explanation by NYT - posted June 1, 2020


    8:38 Video of officers body cams released first by DM - posted August 3rd


    5:47 video from surveillance camera on the corner targeted at the vehicle - posted June 1 by NBC news


    There are a couple or 3 more at least that I recall, cannot find in full, that are partially within the NYT video compilation (from the car behind GF's car, from the street, and one more....)
     
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  7. dixiegirl1035

    dixiegirl1035 I will do it, but I won't like it

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  8. dixiegirl1035

    dixiegirl1035 I will do it, but I won't like it

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    Family coming in..... family giving statement

    Washington Post already streaming in front of courthouse YouTube, 1.7K watching now

    The Telegraph YouTube now live streaming outside of the courthouse at

    Sky News YouTube, nothing on right now except for placemark


    Law & Crime Trial Network (has comment stream for viewers real time, already has begun the comments in feed) – You have to have an account, has rolling comments from viewers which has already begun. https://lawandcrime.com/stream/

    https://lawandcrime.com/live-trials...e-of-murder-trial-over-death-of-george-floyd/ has cable, OTT Streaming, Direct to Consumer, OTT Stream (International) , Audio. (Too numerous to link all!!!!)

    Court TV is available as a free over-the-air channel, and can also be watched on streaming devices from Roku, Amazon Fire TV, Apple TV, Android TV, and Vizio smart TVs. Court TV is also available on streaming services from YouTube TV, Pluto TV, FreeCast, XUMO, Select TV, KlowdTV, NKT.tv, Redbox, and Local Now. Additionally, the trial will also be available on CourtTV.com and on Court TV's iOS and Android apps.

    The Chauvin trial will also be aired on major TV news channels, including HLN, the Fox News Channel, CNN, CBS, and NBC. However, some news channels may only be airing the trial's highlights with additional reporting.

    To watch the trial in its entirety, live-streaming may be the better option. The trial will also be live-streamed by media outlets including CNN, Fox News Digital, CBSN Minnesota, Star Tribune, ABC News Live, on their respective websites.

    Court TV has named the trial the "Minnesota V. Derek Chauvin Trial" and the "MN V Chauvin: The Death of George Floyd Murder Trial" as activists urge against using the phrase "The George Floyd trial."
     
  9. dixiegirl1035

    dixiegirl1035 I will do it, but I won't like it

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  10. dixiegirl1035

    dixiegirl1035 I will do it, but I won't like it

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    Posted by @JerseyGirl on MT

    "Derek Chauvin trial live: 1st witness called after Floyd video shown

    Two hours after the opening of court Monday morning, the defense called its first witness: Jena Lee Scurry, a 911 dispatcher who was working the day of Floyd's death and alerted a supervisor that something was awry in the incident.

    Prosecutor Matthew Frank showed video from the street camera of the sidewalk and street outside of Cup Foods, where Floyd was arrested. Scurry said she remembered looking up at her screen and seeing portions of the live feed from city surveillance videos. She said she remembered seeing Floyd in the cop car. Later, she looked up and saw Floyd was on the ground, and the people in the video did not appear to move for a period of time, Scurry said.

    "I first asked if the screens had frozen because it hadn't changed," Scurry said, adding, "I became concerned that something might be wrong ... it was a gut instinct of, in the incident, something's not going right."

    Scurry said she called a supervisor. "If this was a form of use of force, I was calling to let them know," she said.

    Frank then asked: "Have you ever, prior to that date, made a call like that to a sergeant?"

    "No," Scurry replied.

    Frank played the court a recording of the call Scurry made to the sergeant, where she can be heard saying, "You can call me a snitch if you want to ... I don’t know if they have used force or not. They got something out of the squad (car) and all of them sat on this man."
     
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  11. dixiegirl1035

    dixiegirl1035 I will do it, but I won't like it

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    Posted by @JerseyGirl on MT

    Blackwell said Chauvin had his knee on Floyd's neck for 9 minutes and 29 seconds, contrary to the widely reported estimate of 8 minutes and 46 seconds. Blackwell provided jurors with a visual timeline of that period, pointing to when bystanders attempted to intervene and when Floyd spoke his last words.

    "You will see that he does not let up and he does not get up, even when Mr. Floyd doesn't have a pulse," Blackwell said. "You can believe your eyes. It's homicide. It's murder."

    As the video played, Chauvin sat in the courtroom, taking notes on a yellow legal pad and occasionally looking up at the screen.

    Derek Chauvin trial live: Video of George Floyd death shown

    Why you hear the prosecutor saying 9 minutes 29 seconds, not 8 minutes 46 seconds

    In the May 29 arrest complaint against Chauvin, prosecutors with the Hennepin County Attorney’s Office, which originally handled the case before it was turned over to the state attorney general, said the former officer had his knee on Floyd’s neck for 8 minutes and 46 seconds, citing police body-camera footage that had not yet been made public. But some media organizations questioned this calculation, pointing to time stamps of the video mentioned in the arrest complaint, and a spokesman for the county attorney later amended the time to 7 minutes and 46 seconds.

    But police body-camera footage released publicly in July showed Chauvin held his knee on Floyd’s neck for more than nine minutes, a calculation later reaffirmed by Cahill, who timed it at more than 9 minutes and 20 seconds in a ruling in the fall.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/nation/2021/03/29/chauvin-trial-live-updates/
     
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  12. dixiegirl1035

    dixiegirl1035 I will do it, but I won't like it

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    Posted by @JerseyGirl on MT

    Derek Chauvin trial live: 1st witness called after Floyd video shown

    Two hours after the opening of court Monday morning, the prosecution called its first witness: Jena Lee Scurry, a 911 dispatcher who was working the day of Floyd's death and alerted a supervisor that something was awry in the incident.

    Prosecutor Matthew Frank showed video from the street camera of the sidewalk and street outside of Cup Foods, where Floyd was arrested. Scurry said she remembered looking up at her screen and seeing portions of the live feed from city surveillance videos. She said she remembered seeing Floyd in the cop car. Later, she looked up and saw Floyd was on the ground, and the people in the video did not appear to move for a period of time, Scurry said.

    "I first asked if the screens had frozen because it hadn't changed," Scurry said, adding, "I became concerned that something might be wrong ... it was a gut instinct of, in the incident, something's not going right."

    Scurry said she called a supervisor. "If this was a form of use of force, I was calling to let them know," she said.

    Frank then asked: "Have you ever, prior to that date, made a call like that to a sergeant?"

    "No," Scurry replied.

    Frank played the court a recording of the call Scurry made to the sergeant, where she can be heard saying, "You can call me a snitch if you want to ... I don’t know if they have used force or not. They got something out of the squad (car) and all of them sat on this man."
     
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  13. dixiegirl1035

    dixiegirl1035 I will do it, but I won't like it

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    DAY ONE
    Opening Statements
    1) 911 Operator Jena Scurry
    2) Speedway gas station cashier All*sha Oy*er
    3) MMA guy D*nald W*lliams (prosecution only today)



    'Life squeezed out of him': Jury in George Floyd murder trial shown harrowing video of his death

    https://www.smh.com.au/world/north-...he-death-of-george-floyd-20210329-p57et2.html

    'The very life was squeezed out of him': Trial begins for ex-cop Derek Chauvin accused over George Floyd's death

    George Floyd news: Derek Chauvin trial witness says police were ‘messing’ with man outside gas station

    Donald Williams told the court that George Floyd was repeatedly pleading with police that he was in distress.

    “He was speaking in a distressed way,” Mr Williams said. “He was vocalizing to the officer, he said my stomach hurt, I can’t breathe, my head hurts, I want my mum. Those are the things he repeatedly said.”

    As time progressed, Mr Williams said Mr Floyd was slowly fading away the longer a knee was on his neck.

    “His eyes slowly rolled to the back of his head. You see the blood coming out of his nose. You heard him tell them before he stopped speaking ‘my stomach hurts’,” Mr Williams said.

    “From there on, he was lifeless, he didn’t move, he didn’t speak. He didn’t have no life in him no more on his body movements.”

    George Floyd news - live: Derek Chauvin trial witness says police were ‘messing’ with man outside gas station

    Jurors shown video at ex-officer’s trial in George Floyd’s death

    Williams told Frank that he's been trained on chokeholds. "Air choke is more like choking someone, they still have air to breathe," he said. "Then you also have a choke where it's a blood choke, where it specifically attacks the side of the neck and it specifically cuts off the circulation."

    Williams said sometimes a person might not know they are in a blood choke until they're unconscious.

    Williams went to Cup Foods the night of May 25, 2020. He told Frank that he didn't go into the store because "the energy was off." He said he heard voices and someone calling for their mother. He walked up to the scene where officers were detaining Floyd on the ground, and at that point he said there were about three people there.

    He said he heard people "vocalizing their concerns to the officer" and Floyd "basically pleading for his life."

    Frank asked Williams to describe Floyd's condition as time progressed.

    "When I first arrived on the scene Mr. Floyd was vocalizing his sorry-ness and his pain," he said. As Chauvin's knee was on his neck longer, Williams said, "You seen his eyes slowly pale out."

    He described seeing Floyd's breathing getting heavy, and seeing blood come from his nose eventually.

    "He barely could move while he was trying to get air," Williams said.

    He was the most vocal person at the scene for a while, Williams said, until a first responder arrived on scene. "Her expertise was like, 'Look he's fading away, you need to check his pulse.' She's asking him multiple times, I'm asking him multiple times, no one checked his pulse."

    Williams said former officer Tou Thao said to him, "This is what drugs do to you."

    Because of his experience with mixed martial arts, Williams told the prosecutor that he could observe what Chauvin was doing. The position of the knee on the neck, the movements of the knee, and the position of Floyd all gave him information, Williams said.

    "I felt the officer on top was shimmying to actually get the final choke in while he was on top, to get the kill choke in," Williams said.

    Defense attorney Eric Nelson objected to that statement, and the judge asked the jury to disregard it.

    Chauvin trial livestream: Attorneys question first 3 witnesses | kare11.com

    Judge Peter Cahill asked the jury to leave the room and spoke to Donald Williams II, telling him that his testimony is going beyond what the parties agreed to in pretrial hearings. He said comments like the one about Chauvin making the "kill" choke is too far.

    Cahill asked Williams to stick to what he observed.

    "What inference or what opinions you're drawing, you need to wait for Mr. Frank to ask you an opinion," Cahill said. "You've got to be careful not to volunteer things that have not been asked."
     
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2021
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  14. dixiegirl1035

    dixiegirl1035 I will do it, but I won't like it

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    Posted on MT by @thx4_medic_Babby 1:05:08 video by 10Tampa Bay News - Has complete bodycam videos of Lane and his partner

    WARNING - VERY UPSETTING AND GRAPHIC - ROLL AND SCROLL IF YOU DON'T WANT TO VIEW

     
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  15. dixiegirl1035

    dixiegirl1035 I will do it, but I won't like it

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    TRIAL DAY TWO

    #3 witness - From Yesterday, defense follow up etc with MMA guy D*nald W*lliams - he called 911

    #4 witness - Darn**la - was minor at the time and now 18 - she did the "viral video" that the world has seen and had little cousin with her in green shirt
    #5 witness - Little cousin in green (not posting any info here at WS... due to minor)
    #6 witness - Aly*** who was wearing white shirt and blue jeans in group shot.. knows witness #4 from school and knows another person there she drove there with ( young female K**lyn at scene with large bag on shoulder who has not yet testified. ) She drove up after FG was on ground -took 3 videos.
    #7 witness - K**lyn (?sp) Arrived with #6 witness. Minor, 17 year old. Friend of #6 Aly***. She circled her photo of standing on the curb.. had large beige bag on shoulder next to MMA guy.
    #8 witness - 27 yo Lady firefighter/EMT who was in all black with white headband that day, with CPR training (wearing uniform in court) from Minneapolis who was on a walk who took video and did 911 call. She was 7th person to arrive on the curb with others watching . The judge chewed her out at the end of today for "arguing with the court" and arguing with attorneys.



    The second day of Derek Chauvin's trial in George Floyd's death is set to begin Tuesday with further questioning of a professional mixed martial arts fighter who stumbled onto the scene of the 46-year-old Black man's final moments.

    Chauvin could be convicted of all, some, or none of the charges. Minnesota's sentencing guidelines recommend about 12.5 years in prison for each murder charge and about four years for the manslaughter charge.

    Derek Chauvin trial to continue with MMA fighter who watched George Floyd's death - CNN

    Poster by @JerseyGirl on MT

    "This is what I saw," Williams said, after Minnesota Assistant Attorney General Matthew Frank displayed a now-famous photo of Chauvin holding his knee on Floyd's neck. In the photo, Chauvin is looking up at the camera.

    "The only reason why he's looking at me right now is because I told him it was a 'blood choke,'" Williams told Frank, who is leading the prosecution.

    When asked what he heard from Floyd, Williams said the man was in distress, repeatedly saying that he couldn't breathe and that he was in pain. Floyd also said he was sorry, Williams recalled. He later said that at the time, he didn't know Floyd's name.

    With Frank asking questions, he discussed his experience with choke holds and the practice of "tapping out" when a fighter submits.

    He also said he saw Chauvin use a "shimmy" hold on Floyd, to restrict his motions.

    Williams had gone fishing with his son earlier on May 25, and he said that after struggling to remember how to cut their catch up, he decided to get some air and pick up something to drink from Cup Foods. But as he walked toward the door, he saw two police vehicles outside. He started to wonder if perhaps he should just leave. He never made it inside.

    "My energy stopped me, the surroundings stopped me," Williams said. "The energy of the air ... the energy was off. I couldn't like, get in the door for some reason."

    As he watched the police actions taking place outside Cup Foods, Williams said he wondered, "Should I involve myself?"

    He started hearing people talking and yelling, as officers struggled with George Floyd. Someone was saying to calm down. Another person called for their mother, he said. And one voice was saying, "Let him up."

    The court saw a still photo from a surveillance video, showing Williams walking toward the door of the store, with the police in the street and several bystanders standing along the edge of the sidewalk.

    "I observed the scene first before I spoke," Williams said.

    An older man was calling out to Floyd, telling him that it would be OK and not to resist arrest, Williams said. Bystanders also told police they were concerned.

    He says he also heard "George, on the ground, pretty much pleading for his life."

    Williams walked closer to the commotion, moving to the edge of the street. As he recalls, he was "battling with myself to stay on the curb" as he watched what transpired.

    Williams said he called former officer Tou Thou by his last name because he was close enough to read it on the officer's badge. As for what Thou's role was, he said, "He was the dictator," controlling what happened along the curb.

    "He was the guy that let it go on," Williams said. Tou and two other officers will be tried separately on charges of aiding and abetting.

    "I was totally scared for my safety and those around me," Williams said as he continued his testimony Tuesday.

    He said he grew emotional because of the situation – and also because of how police were behaving. They were "nonresponsive" to his and other onlookers' concerns, he said.

    He added that after the ambulance arrived, Chauvin did not take his knee off of Floyd's neck. After Floyd was loaded onto a gurney and taken away in an ambulance, Williams lingered.

    He was nervous, he said, and didn't know what to do. He saw the officers move across the front of the store, away from the scene. Williams then pulled up his cellphone, called 911 – and reported to the dispatcher that he had just seen a murder. He said he felt the need "to call the police on the police."

    The prosecution then played the recording of Williams' 911 call in court. "That was bogus, what they just did," Williams told the dispatcher.

    In the emergency call, Williams singled out one officer by his badge number – he was referring to Chauvin, he acknowledged as he pointed to the former officer in court.

    Jury In Chauvin Trial Hears More From Witness About 'Blood Choke'
     
    Lilibet likes this.
  16. margarita25

    margarita25 Well-Known Member

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    Day 2, starts here:


    *Begins with defense’s cross examination of Williams.





    *minor’s testimony starts at 4:51

    (I also thought it was “powerful” in that video where GH was still standing there on the street as the ambulance pulled away - shortly before this, the little girl was one of the last left standing there too, iirc. I am skipping the minor’s testimony for now because I really want to hear GH)

    *GH’s testimony (firefighter/EMT) starts at 6:33ish
     
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  17. margarita25

    margarita25 Well-Known Member

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  18. thx4_medic_Babby

    thx4_medic_Babby Well-Known Member

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    Please delete.
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2021
  19. margarita25

    margarita25 Well-Known Member

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    (Note some time stamps above may be incorrect due to watching it live & multitasking)
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2021
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  20. margarita25

    margarita25 Well-Known Member

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