Australia Australia - Jenny Cook, 29, Townsville, Qld, 19 Jan 2009

"The wound was to the left side of the chest, entering the left lung through the area between the 2nd and 3rd rib. At 135cm above the heels, the wound passed right downwards and backwards to penetrate the lung to a depth of 7cm".

If this rubbish is believed, Jenny bent her legs and stood upward to meet the knife? Surely if this was the case she would have had to hold onto the door from to pull herself hard into the knife. Were talking 7cm depth! Where were her fingerprints?? Did the police dust??
I feel so sorry for her parents knowing her murderer could be off living the good life on Jenny's money.
 
FigTree There must have been some costs involved getting the workcover through. Jenny had been off work 18 months. She was dealing with a Barrister.[/QUOTE said:
I believe WorkCover pays all medical bills including physio.
If Jenny got 'no win no pay' solicitors firm then I'm sure that would cover the barrister within the firm.
 
O

I'm sorry but it just irks the he77 out of me that someone would say they weren't going to collect a piece of evidence because it was too big. It's not like you have to carry it by hand. Or just take a sample if really it's that immovable.

I agree, in the Novi Chardon case they ripped up a back yard to find a buried car! Oh but a lump of plywood is too big. :(
It sounds like a joke= Q) How do 24 police officers move a slab of ply? A) With obvious great difficulty.
 
Q) How do 24 police officers move a slab of ply? A) With obvious great difficulty.

:giggle:

Yeah, I can't find the window/knife measurements anywhere. I was thinking, if it was 100% spot on, 135 cm off the ground then we could be more sure that Jenny hit the knife in situ, in the window grill (by one cause or another). I doubt a killer would zap out a tape measure to get the height right, if she was stabbed by someone.
 
Do we know that the knife handle was recently wrapped with twine? Only, I was reading some blogs/sites on how to wrap a knife handle with twine, and it seems that it is also done by hunters and knife-nuts. Was PC a 'pigger'?

If he was, and he had previously wrapped the handle with twine for his hunting activities, it is pretty hard to believe that the knife would have been stored in a kitchen knife block.
 
Do we know that the knife handle was recently wrapped with twine? Only, I was reading some blogs/sites on how to wrap a knife handle with twine, and it seems that it is done by hunters and knife-nuts. Was PC a 'pigger'?

If he was, and he had previously wrapped the handle with twine for his hunting activities, it is pretty hard to believe that the knife would have been stored in a kitchen knife block.

Not another case with 'piggers'!!! Aaaaahhhhh........:hills:

(as long as we don't have to see anymore horrendous FB 'trophy' shots!!!:facepalm:)
 
Do we know that the knife handle was recently wrapped with twine? Only, I was reading some blogs/sites on how to wrap a knife handle with twine, and it seems that it is also done by hunters and knife-nuts. Was PC a 'pigger'?

If he was, and he had previously wrapped the handle with twine for his hunting activities, it is pretty hard to believe that the knife would have been stored in a kitchen knife block.

Looking at the pic of the knife again, the twine looks really clean. Spotless. It certainly doesn't look well-used.

(I don't want to post the pic here, as it's the weapon that killed Jenny and it gives me the creeps. Here is the article the pic is in though:
http://www.smh.com.au/national/knife-edge-20140714-3bvp7.html)
 
Looking at the pic of the knife again, the twine looks really clean. Spotless. It certainly doesn't look well-used.

(I don't want to post the pic here, as it's the weapon that killed Jenny and it gives me the creeps. Here is the article the pic is in though:
http://www.smh.com.au/national/knife-edge-20140714-3bvp7.html)

He only used the knife 3 times (or 3 times a year, depending which of his versions you use) - but I know what you mean, definitely a clean handle. Not even Jenny's blood spatter on it.
 
Looking at the pic of the knife again, the twine looks really clean. Spotless. It certainly doesn't look well-used.

(I don't want to post the pic here, as it's the weapon that killed Jenny and it gives me the creeps. Here is the article the pic is in though:
http://www.smh.com.au/national/knife-edge-20140714-3bvp7.html)

If you can zoom in, take a look at the blade and handle. Am I wrong or am I looking at a blade put into a tube of steel. The steel handle looks hollow. I looked at my similar knives & they have a clean streamline fitting. Does the tube look hollow? I wish I had a front on view of that knife to see the actual handle. Can anyone see the brand?

Why would a new house have a gap big enough to wedge a knife like that, it looks about 1" gap. I can't get my head around the actual gap. Is it between the door frame and the concrete or between the aluminium security door. No new homes are so jerry built.
 
If you can zoom in, take a look at the blade and handle. Am I wrong or am I looking at a blade put into a tube of steel. The steel handle looks hollow. I looked at my similar knives & they have a clean streamline fitting. Does the tube look hollow? I wish I had a front on view of that knife to see the actual handle. Can anyone see the brand?

Why would a new house have a gap big enough to wedge a knife like that, it looks about 1" gap. I can't get my head around the actual gap. Is it between the door frame and the concrete or between the aluminium security door. No new homes are so jerry built.

It does look hollow, like the blade is sitting within a cavity. Unusual knife. :thinking:

Was the string wrapped round the handle to give it more width, so it would sit in the gap tightly? Just can't imagine a young woman doing that, just doesn't add up. A person can stab themselves while blindfolded, why the bizarre setup. :thinking:
 
If you can zoom in, take a look at the blade and handle. Am I wrong or am I looking at a blade put into a tube of steel. The steel handle looks hollow. I looked at my similar knives & they have a clean streamline fitting. Does the tube look hollow? I wish I had a front on view of that knife to see the actual handle. Can anyone see the brand?

Why would a new house have a gap big enough to wedge a knife like that, it looks about 1" gap. I can't get my head around the actual gap. Is it between the door frame and the concrete or between the aluminium security door. No new homes are so jerry built.

I've been concerned about the gap between the door and the house too. My exterior door openings have a wood frame around them, so that there is no gap between the door(s) and the house - the frame covers the gap. Where is the frame around their door? Who builds a house and doesn't frame around the door openings?

awnings_sunscreens_security_doors_009.jpg


http://www.chandlerscreen.com/security-doors.html
 
I've been concerned about the gap between the door and the house too. My exterior door openings have a wood frame around them, so that there is no gap between the door(s) and the house - the frame covers the gap. Where is the frame around their door? Who builds a new house and doesn't frame around the door openings?

awnings_sunscreens_security_doors_009.jpg


http://www.chandlerscreen.com/security-doors.html

It's a rendered house so there not gaps between the brickwork.
 
It's a rendered house so there not gaps between the brickwork.

I think they all still fill the gaps with a frame. Jenny's house was rendered - and the pic I posted is a rendered house.

Not sure what you mean.
 
I've a sick feeling that knife is something like this. 'A skeleton knife'.
The blade is somehow into a steel tube and then bound.
According to the net these blades are everywhere, even Ebay! Why?
http://www.darkwoodarmory.com/images/knifekit1.jpg

I keep a clean kitchen & I wouldn't see a knife missing at first glance. It might be in the dishwasher. It's not adding up.
I can't see a set of knives with handles like this, they are all more of a streamlined designed. I'd say for cleanliness.

http://www.darkwoodarmory.com/images/knifekit1.jpg
 
I think they all still fill the gaps with a frame. Jenny's house was rendered - and the pic I posted is a rendered house.

Not sure what you mean.

You are 100% right! I have bricks and there are little gaps in the mortar but no knife handle of that size would fit. Your pic is perfect because it's rendered so no gaps!
 
Remember what PC said about the knife? I'll paraphrase: "I don't know why I bought it. It's like a *effword* sword."

Now I blinked a bit at that when I first read it, because it sounded to me as if the knife was bought not as a part of a set, but as a separate item. It was purchased by PC.

It looks to me like a carving-knife. The only knife I've ever seen that long and slender in a kitchen was my grandad's carver, kept sharp for carving the Sunday roasts. My Pa could carve slice of beef paper thin with that thing. It looks highly impractical for any other purpose, IMO.

If it was keeping with the trendy (and expensive) stainless steel kitchen setting, it would be a posh brand (see the maker's mark? I can't make it out, but I'll bet it's a posh brand) with a stainless steel perfectly weighted handle. I might be wrong. But I'd put money on it that I'm not.

The window was covered by a security grill - the knife was jammed between the wall and the grill, and I think maybe the window was inset, and the grill stood out from the window a bit. I can see how there'd be a gap there, if I'm imagining it right, I just can't describe it better at this late hour.

Now what I cannot fathom is, why wrap it in tape and then an orderly layer of string, just to jam it in that gap (in a supposed fit of sudden, suicidal depression which involved wearing a sheet over a sunhat, if you get my drift..)? Why not a heap of tape alone? Why is the string so neat? It's just weird.
 
Im not seeing Jenny wrapping that knife at all. And I dont see the knife (in the photos) dirty enough to be used as a kitchen knife and in the kitchen block (where it was noticed it was missing from, early on the arrival home of the husband).
If the knife was said to be only used (by him) a few times per year.

It also seems from the reports the knife belonged to PJC and not a knife regularly used 'in the kitchen' - so why was it in the kitchen block? Im not aware of men who have their very own knife in the kitchen block.
From what I gather, the knife was bought separately - not in a set of knives.

Sorry, quoting myself as this is following on from some research on the knife.

Below is just my opinion...
From what I gather - looking at the shape of the knife and the length
The knife is a Sushimi / Sushi or Yanagiba - blade and handle.

These knives are slender - and range in length up to 23+cm,
Its hard to tell what length blade the one in the wall is that pierced Jenny - but assuming that the knife went in 7cm - the blade length could be approximately 13cm - but looking at the blade length and where the blood is on the knife - and taking into consideration that the wound length and the blood on the knife length maybe different - its hard to tell how big this blade was.

I hope they did a comparison with the length of the blood smear on the knife - and the length of the blade injury.
They should match forensically.

Also thinking - There must be a blood pattern on the knife to match the stab wound which - by my unprofessional eye - sees some of the blood on the knife has flown vertically down the blood but is at the wrong or inconsistent angle to a gravity flow.
All the blood should be swiping down the knife length to the tip - not across the blade and down to the bottom.

It may mean the knife was placed there after the stabbing
The knife was moved after the stabbing but before the blood dried.

These are just my thoughts - Im sure if someone who had the right professional forensic skills could look at the knife and the blood pattern - they could make a professional opinion on that.

Sushi knife:
A traditional sushi knife is made of high-quality carbon steel, the same type of steel to forge a katana (traditional Japanese sword). Unlike most Western knives, sushi knives are only sharpened on one edge which allows cleaner, more precise cuts.

Yanagiba – Loosely translated to willow-shape, this knife has a deep and pointed blade that is really long (usually around 13 inches) and has some heft to it. Professional sushi chefs use this knife to slice fish.


The knife below is a sample of a similar blade and IS NOT THE KNIFE that was found at the house.
It is used an an example.

attachment.php



So yes, these blades are extremely sharp - they are meant to be - and strong but brittle - sharpened on one side, unless it was a western asian manufactured knife and might be sharpened on both sides.

It is sometimes used for fishing - but rarely - its a specialist knife.
Why did PC buy this type of knife and have it sitting in the kitchen block.
Why look (or unload the dishwasher) if its only been used 3 times (or as later amended he said 3 times a year).

Was this his knife?
Had anyone else ever seen this knife in the kitchen or in the block?
It would stand out - It was an individual knife - and if the handle was already wrapped it would stand out even more.

I have big doubts about the story of this knife.
Where did he buy it from?
Receipt please?
 
Nice research FigTree. That does look like a similar knife for sure, and the distinctive narrow handle has stood out to me all along. That and the neatness of the string binding has made me wonder about whether or not it had been wrapped like that for some time - just to make it easier for a novice to handle. I wish we could see a photo of the knife when it was taken out of the wall. String and tape has been described - so it would be interesting to see where the tape was used. For all we know it might have only been on the end wedged into the wall - and obviously added to bulk it up and make it a more secure fit. That tape and the string would have to contain the skin cells of whoever bound it - and heaps of them due to the tightness of the binding. Heaps of pulling and friction there, and enough to slough off skin cells that would surely have been enough for identification.
 
Nice research FigTree. That does look like a similar knife for sure, and the distinctive narrow handle has stood out to me all along. That and the neatness of the string binding has made me wonder about whether or not it had been wrapped like that for some time - just to make it easier for a novice to handle. I wish we could see a photo of the knife when it was taken out of the wall. String and tape has been described - so it would be interesting to see where the tape was used. For all we know it might have only been on the end wedged into the wall - and obviously added to bulk it up and make it a more secure fit. That tape and the string would have to contain the skin cells of whoever bound it - and heaps of them due to the tightness of the binding. Heaps of pulling and friction there, and enough to slough off skin cells that would surely have been enough for identification.

Agreed catwiskers - there should have been a drag of skin cells after every bind, and if anything the tape should have been searched for prints.

I also wondered about 'the string'.
When I first saw the handle I thought it looked like wool or velcro thread- then trying to have a closer look the string doesn't look like it is a ply - it looks like a single thread string - a soft string which may have a very slight stretch to it - like a craft string...
That's a hard one...

attachment.php


Knife handle wrapped.
 

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